Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

health question

Expand Messages
  • lisaxdavidson
    Hi, A while ago, someone wrote in that you should throw away fuzzy old lead type, and also throw away the case that it was in. If you find an empty case for
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 15, 2007
      Hi,
      A while ago, someone wrote in that you should throw away fuzzy old lead type, and also
      throw away the case that it was in. If you find an empty case for sale and you don't know
      what used to be in it, is there a way to clean possible lead oxides out of it? I know EDTA will
      get rid of it, but it must need to be in solution. Is there a dry remedy?
      Lisa Davidson
    • Peter Fraterdeus
      Hi Lisa Whoever wrote that you should throw away old type was proposing a rather blatant violation of environmental protection rules I expect. Lead will
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 15, 2007
        Hi Lisa
        Whoever wrote that you should throw away old type was proposing a rather blatant violation of environmental protection rules I expect. Lead will eventually leach into ground-water if dumped in a standard landfill.

        Lead should not be introduced to the standard waste stream in any form.
        I like the idea of rinsing the type with vinegar to dissolve the oxide effluence, but then this also needs proper disposal.

        I'm not sure what options exist for this...
        I expect that someone here will have an informed opinion!

        Cheers
        PF


        At 7:13 AM +0000 15 10 07, lisaxdavidson wrote:
        >Hi,
        >A while ago, someone wrote in that you should throw away fuzzy old lead type, and also
        >throw away the case that it was in. If you find an empty case for sale and you don't know
        >what used to be in it, is there a way to clean possible lead oxides out of it? I know EDTA will
        >get rid of it, but it must need to be in solution. Is there a dry remedy?
        >Lisa Davidson
        >

        --
        AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@
        {ARTQ: Help stop in-box bloat! Always Remember to Trim the Quote!}

        ExquisiteLetterpress http://www.exquisiteletterpress.com

        -:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*
        Peter Fraterdeus http://www.alphabets.com : Sign up for "MiceType"!
        Galena, Illinois Design Philosophy Fonts Lettering Letterpress Wood Type
        Dubuque, Iowa http://www.fraterdeus.com
        Photography Irish Fiddle Political Observation
        http://flickr.com/photos/pfraterdeus
        http://youtube.com/user/pfraterdeus
      • Don
        Hi Lisa, I deal in scrap metals at times and in most states lead is a recyclable commodity. The last time I hauled some to the scrap yard I was paid $35.00 a
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 15, 2007
          Hi Lisa,
          I deal in scrap metals at times and in most states lead is a
          recyclable commodity. The last time I hauled some to the scrap yard I
          was paid $35.00 a ton. The price for most metals have risen sense then
          so it might be more.
          Don
          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Lisa
          > Whoever wrote that you should throw away old type was proposing a
          rather blatant violation of environmental protection rules I expect.
          Lead will eventually leach into ground-water if dumped in a standard
          landfill.
          >
          > Lead should not be introduced to the standard waste stream in any form.
          > I like the idea of rinsing the type with vinegar to dissolve the
          oxide effluence, but then this also needs proper disposal.
          >
          > I'm not sure what options exist for this...
          > I expect that someone here will have an informed opinion!
          >
          > Cheers
          > PF
          >
          >
          > At 7:13 AM +0000 15 10 07, lisaxdavidson wrote:
          > >Hi,
          > >A while ago, someone wrote in that you should throw away fuzzy old
          lead type, and also
          > >throw away the case that it was in. If you find an empty case for
          sale and you don't know
          > >what used to be in it, is there a way to clean possible lead oxides
          out of it? I know EDTA will
          > >get rid of it, but it must need to be in solution. Is there a dry
          remedy?
          > >Lisa Davidson
          > >
          >
          > --
          > AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@
          > {ARTQ: Help stop in-box bloat! Always Remember to Trim the Quote!}
          >
          > ExquisiteLetterpress http://www.exquisiteletterpress.com
          >
          >
          -:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*
          > Peter Fraterdeus http://www.alphabets.com : Sign up for "MiceType"!
          > Galena, Illinois Design Philosophy Fonts Lettering Letterpress Wood Type
          > Dubuque, Iowa http://www.fraterdeus.com
          > Photography Irish Fiddle Political Observation
          > http://flickr.com/photos/pfraterdeus
          > http://youtube.com/user/pfraterdeus
          >
        • Lisa Davidson
          Thanks, but I don t have any lead to dispose of -- I was just wondering how to clean a wooden drawer that may have had poisonous fuzzy horrid old lead type in
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 15, 2007
            Thanks, but I don't have any lead to dispose of -- I was just
            wondering how to clean a wooden drawer that may have had poisonous
            fuzzy horrid old lead type in at but I don't know if it did or not.
            Lisa


            On Oct 15, 2007, at 11:39 AM, Don wrote:

            > Hi Lisa,
            > I deal in scrap metals at times and in most states lead is a
            > recyclable commodity. The last time I hauled some to the scrap yard I
            > was paid $35.00 a ton. The price for most metals have risen sense then
            > so it might be more.
            > Don
            > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi Lisa
            > > Whoever wrote that you should throw away old type was proposing a
            > rather blatant violation of environmental protection rules I expect.
            > Lead will eventually leach into ground-water if dumped in a standard
            > landfill.
            > >
            > > Lead should not be introduced to the standard waste stream in any
            > form.
            > > I like the idea of rinsing the type with vinegar to dissolve the
            > oxide effluence, but then this also needs proper disposal.
            > >
            > > I'm not sure what options exist for this...
            > > I expect that someone here will have an informed opinion!
            > >
            > > Cheers
            > > PF
            > >
            > >
            > > At 7:13 AM +0000 15 10 07, lisaxdavidson wrote:
            > > >Hi,
            > > >A while ago, someone wrote in that you should throw away fuzzy old
            > lead type, and also
            > > >throw away the case that it was in. If you find an empty case for
            > sale and you don't know
            > > >what used to be in it, is there a way to clean possible lead oxides
            > out of it? I know EDTA will
            > > >get rid of it, but it must need to be in solution. Is there a dry
            > remedy?
            > > >Lisa Davidson
            > > >
            > >
            > > --
            > > AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@
            > > {ARTQ: Help stop in-box bloat! Always Remember to Trim the Quote!}
            > >
            > > ExquisiteLetterpresshttp://www.exquisiteletterpress.com
            > >
            > >
            > -:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-
            > *-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*
            > > Peter Fraterdeus http://www.alphabets.com : Sign up for "MiceType"!
            > > Galena, Illinois Design Philosophy Fonts Lettering Letterpress
            > Wood Type
            > > Dubuque, Iowa http://www.fraterdeus.com
            > > Photography Irish Fiddle Political Observation
            > > http://flickr.com/photos/pfraterdeus
            > > http://youtube.com/user/pfraterdeus
            > >
            >
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Gerald Lange
            Lisa Usually the corrosion is caused by the case itself. In a damp environment the acid leaching from the wood is the culprit. In such cases, at least in most
            Message 5 of 11 , Oct 16, 2007
              Lisa

              Usually the corrosion is caused by the case itself. In a damp
              environment the acid leaching from the wood is the culprit. In such
              cases, at least in most that I have seen, the typecase is damaged as
              well. So, if the case is clean and without water damage, likely it is
              fine.

              For those in the LA environs, Art Green buys used metal and pays a
              very good price. It would not matter if the metal was corroded. I
              don't have his contact info at hand but I did provide it here just a
              short while back.

              I once removed the remnants of a basement print shop (in a search for
              the missing chill of an abandoned Albion iron handpress once used for
              teaching by Saul Marks at USC) that had been walled in for over twenty
              years. At some point prior students had taken to partying there and
              the type was completely corroded from urine. And the metal guy took it
              all.

              The chill was found amidst the debris. The press now resides in
              working condition at Occidental College.

              Gerald
              http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


              >
              > Thanks, but I don't have any lead to dispose of -- I was just
              > wondering how to clean a wooden drawer that may have had poisonous
              > fuzzy horrid old lead type in at but I don't know if it did or not.
              > Lisa
              >
              >
            • Lisa Davidson
              Good Lord. Peeing on type??? ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 11 , Oct 16, 2007
                Good Lord. Peeing on type???


                On Oct 16, 2007, at 1:27 AM, Gerald Lange wrote:

                > Lisa
                >
                > Usually the corrosion is caused by the case itself. In a damp
                > environment the acid leaching from the wood is the culprit. In such
                > cases, at least in most that I have seen, the typecase is damaged as
                > well. So, if the case is clean and without water damage, likely it is
                > fine.
                >
                > For those in the LA environs, Art Green buys used metal and pays a
                > very good price. It would not matter if the metal was corroded. I
                > don't have his contact info at hand but I did provide it here just a
                > short while back.
                >
                > I once removed the remnants of a basement print shop (in a search for
                > the missing chill of an abandoned Albion iron handpress once used for
                > teaching by Saul Marks at USC) that had been walled in for over twenty
                > years. At some point prior students had taken to partying there and
                > the type was completely corroded from urine. And the metal guy took it
                > all.
                >
                > The chill was found amidst the debris. The press now resides in
                > working condition at Occidental College.
                >
                > Gerald
                > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                >
                > >
                > > Thanks, but I don't have any lead to dispose of -- I was just
                > > wondering how to clean a wooden drawer that may have had poisonous
                > > fuzzy horrid old lead type in at but I don't know if it did or not.
                > > Lisa
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Mike Jacobs
                It helps hold a forme together !!! AND......it s cheaper than using beer !!!! :-) Mike, Hampshire, England BullGuard Anti-virus has scanned this e-mail and
                Message 7 of 11 , Oct 16, 2007
                  It helps hold a forme together !!!

                  AND......it's cheaper than using beer !!!! :-)

                  Mike, Hampshire, England



                  BullGuard Anti-virus has scanned this e-mail and found it clean.
                  Try BullGuard for free: www.bullguard.com



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • heidrun mumper-drumm
                  ....and it s obviously a guy thing. Heidrun
                  Message 8 of 11 , Oct 16, 2007
                    ....and it's obviously a 'guy thing.'

                    Heidrun

                    -----Original Message-----
                    >From: Mike Jacobs <mike918print@...>
                    >Sent: Oct 16, 2007 2:48 AM
                    >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                    >Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: health question
                    >
                    >It helps hold a forme together !!!
                    >
                    >AND......it's cheaper than using beer !!!! :-)
                    >
                    >Mike, Hampshire, England
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >BullGuard Anti-virus has scanned this e-mail and found it clean.
                    >Try BullGuard for free: www.bullguard.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Steve Robison
                    (I will be cross posting this on various yahoogroups such as sfletterpress and ppletterpress lists, etc. because I think the topic is worthy of discussion for
                    Message 9 of 11 , Oct 16, 2007
                      (I will be cross posting this on various yahoogroups
                      such as sfletterpress and ppletterpress lists, etc.
                      because I think the topic is worthy of discussion for
                      every letterpress printer...I hope no one gets too
                      upset about that...I just think it falls into the
                      realm o health and safety and deserves to be shared by
                      all -SR)

                      To All:

                      As mentioned in earlier recent ppletterpress posts,
                      the fuzzy whitish-grey powdery stuff on old type is
                      mostly lead carbonate (PbCO3 - aka: "white lead") and
                      is very toxic if ingested. The hydrochloric acid in
                      the human stomach breaks down the PbCO3 and releases
                      the lead into the bloodstream. Once there it is free
                      to travel through the body.

                      Toxic amounts of lead in the bloodstream may cause
                      irreversible neurological damage as well as renal
                      disease, cardiovascular effects, and reproductive
                      toxicity. As a neurotoxin in the brain, particularly
                      in young children, it can be the cause of a whole
                      range of problems with the interruption of
                      neurotransmitter function and overall brain function
                      and can, if not counteracted, cause permanent brain
                      damage.

                      So yeah, this stuff is not to be take lightly. But
                      before I scare you so much that you give up lead alloy
                      type altogether, I want you to know that it can also
                      be handled in ways that substantially mitigate against
                      these risks. So don't freak out completely about this.
                      Just handle it with knowledge and some common sense.

                      Here are the main ways it can cause problems and some
                      common sense steps to deal with it without getting all
                      unnecessarily paranoid about it...

                      1. Don't eat it! (Lead carbonate and other lead salts
                      that may accompany it are actually said to be sweet to
                      the taste, so very young children who are putting
                      anything and everything into their mouths tend to be
                      the most vulnerable...but why would any adult do this
                      except to compete in the Darwin awards???!!!)

                      2. After handling type (fuzzy or not) wash your hands
                      before eating or putting your fingers in your mouth.
                      We learned this in kindergarten to reduce the spread
                      of viruses and bacteria, but it's also a good practice
                      throughout adult life too, especially if you're a
                      letterpress printer and want to have a lead-free life!

                      3. If there is a lot of the lead carbonate dust left
                      in a type case, don't blow on it or otherwise stir it
                      up and breathe it...because the dust will collect in
                      the mucous membranes of your airways and mouth and you
                      will eventually wind up swallowing some of it... and
                      once swallowed it is in your stomach and eventually
                      into your bloodstream.

                      OK. Here's what I do when I obtain used type to reduce
                      and practically eliminate all of these risks...

                      I like to carefully take all of the type out of the
                      case that I receive it in, and then, using rubber
                      gloves, soak and gently bathe and brush the type in a
                      bathe of mineral spirits (paint thinner)using an old
                      toothbrush to remove most of any residual lead
                      carbonate dust and other debris. Remember to only
                      brush the type when it's thoroughly submerged or at
                      least covered with wet solvent so that none of the dry
                      lead carbonate can fly into the air.

                      Some people have also suggested using vinegar (mild
                      acetic acid) to remove the lead carbonate. This
                      certainly works...just remember to wash the type
                      afterward with lots of clear running water to remove
                      any residual acetic acid, or in some way neutralize
                      any remaining acetic acid before returning the type to
                      the case (maybe with a mild baking soda solution
                      followed by a water rinse???). Otherwise the presence
                      of residual acid on the type will actually accelerate
                      the formation of more new lead carbonate after you
                      have just gone to great lengths to removed it!).

                      I then carefully vacuum the type case using my shop
                      vac and avoid breathing any dust. Wearing a dust mask
                      during this process would probably be a good idea too,
                      although I confess that I have never done so. I just
                      make sure the vacuum is sucking up the dust so that
                      it's not getting kicked up in the air. I then take a
                      rag dampened with water(lightly squeezed out so that
                      it's just damp and not dripping wet) and slowly and
                      carefully wipe the compartments of the case to remove
                      any residual dust that might contain any possible lead
                      carbonate. I let the case dry thoroughly, then re-lay
                      the case with the clean type into the clean
                      compartments.

                      As I mentioned in earlier posts, if you continue to
                      clean your type after each use on the press with a
                      mild solvent like kerosene or mineral spirits, you
                      will coat the type with a mild residual film which
                      will help prevent any further corrosion.

                      So now that the type and case are cleaned, what do you
                      do with the lead carbonate that you've removed??

                      Well, if you have followed the process above, the lead
                      carbonate will be in solution with the solvent or with
                      the vinegar that you used to clean the type, or in
                      your shop vac after vacuuming the cases, or in the
                      water that you used to rinse the vinegar off the type,
                      or on the damp rag that you used to wipe out the
                      cases...and then what do you do with it??

                      That's a tough question, because in most cases there
                      is very little lead carbonate present in the first
                      place and you can barely see it on most of the used
                      type you obtain In other instances, where it is
                      clearly visible on the type, it is difficult to see it
                      when it is removed and in a liquid solution. So my
                      admonishment is to just do your best to keep as much
                      of it as possible from getting airborne and by keeping
                      as much of it as possible out of the landfill. Do this
                      by containing it in plastic bags, jars, etc....and
                      taking it to your nearest toxic waste disposal site
                      when you need to...along with batteries and other
                      items containing toxic metals. They may look at you a
                      little funny, but hey, they have ways of dealing with
                      it that you don't. Just clearly label it (Lead
                      carbonate in vinegar/Lead carbonate in water, etc.)
                      and hand it over.

                      Or, if you just can't get a grip on all of this, there
                      is always photopolymer!

                      Does this help?

                      --Steve

                      Steve Robison
                      Robison Press
                      Belmont, CA (about 25 miles south of San Francisco)



                      Steve Robison
                      robisonsteve@...



                      ____________________________________________________________________________________
                      Need a vacation? Get great deals
                      to amazing places on Yahoo! Travel.
                      http://travel.yahoo.com/
                    • Peter Fraterdeus
                      Steve Many thanks for this concise FAQ ;-) Cheers Peter ... ... -- AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@ {ARTQ: Help stop in-box
                      Message 10 of 11 , Oct 16, 2007
                        Steve

                        Many thanks for this concise FAQ ;-)

                        Cheers
                        Peter

                        >As mentioned in earlier recent ppletterpress posts,
                        >the fuzzy whitish-grey powdery stuff on old type is
                        >mostly lead carbonate (PbCO3 - aka: "white lead") and
                        >is very toxic if ingested. The hydrochloric acid in
                        >the human stomach breaks down the PbCO3 and releases
                        >the lead into the bloodstream. Once there it is free
                        >to travel through the body.
                        ...
                        --
                        AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@
                        {ARTQ: Help stop in-box bloat! Always Remember to Trim the Quote!}

                        ExquisiteLetterpress http://www.exquisiteletterpress.com

                        -:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*-:-*
                        Peter Fraterdeus http://www.alphabets.com : Sign up for "MiceType"!
                        Galena, Illinois Design Philosophy Fonts Lettering Letterpress Wood Type
                        Dubuque, Iowa http://www.fraterdeus.com
                        Photography Irish Fiddle Political Observation
                        http://flickr.com/photos/pfraterdeus
                        http://youtube.com/user/pfraterdeus
                      • heidrun mumper-drumm
                        Thank you so much for a very informative message. Heidrun
                        Message 11 of 11 , Oct 16, 2007
                          Thank you so much for a very informative message.

                          Heidrun

                          -----Original Message-----
                          >From: Steve Robison <robisonsteve@...>
                          >Sent: Oct 16, 2007 2:16 PM
                          >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                          >Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: health question - fuzzy whitish-grey powdery stuff on old lead alloy type
                          >
                          >(I will be cross posting this on various yahoogroups
                          >such as sfletterpress and ppletterpress lists, etc.
                          >because I think the topic is worthy of discussion for
                          >every letterpress printer...I hope no one gets too
                          >upset about that...I just think it falls into the
                          >realm o health and safety and deserves to be shared by
                          >all -SR)
                          >
                          >To All:
                          >
                          >As mentioned in earlier recent ppletterpress posts,
                          >the fuzzy whitish-grey powdery stuff on old type is
                          >mostly lead carbonate (PbCO3 - aka: "white lead") and
                          >is very toxic if ingested. The hydrochloric acid in
                          >the human stomach breaks down the PbCO3 and releases
                          >the lead into the bloodstream. Once there it is free
                          >to travel through the body.
                          >
                          >Toxic amounts of lead in the bloodstream may cause
                          >irreversible neurological damage as well as renal
                          >disease, cardiovascular effects, and reproductive
                          >toxicity. As a neurotoxin in the brain, particularly
                          >in young children, it can be the cause of a whole
                          >range of problems with the interruption of
                          >neurotransmitter function and overall brain function
                          >and can, if not counteracted, cause permanent brain
                          >damage.
                          >
                          >So yeah, this stuff is not to be take lightly. But
                          >before I scare you so much that you give up lead alloy
                          >type altogether, I want you to know that it can also
                          >be handled in ways that substantially mitigate against
                          >these risks. So don't freak out completely about this.
                          >Just handle it with knowledge and some common sense.
                          >
                          >Here are the main ways it can cause problems and some
                          >common sense steps to deal with it without getting all
                          >unnecessarily paranoid about it...
                          >
                          >1. Don't eat it! (Lead carbonate and other lead salts
                          >that may accompany it are actually said to be sweet to
                          >the taste, so very young children who are putting
                          >anything and everything into their mouths tend to be
                          >the most vulnerable...but why would any adult do this
                          >except to compete in the Darwin awards???!!!)
                          >
                          >2. After handling type (fuzzy or not) wash your hands
                          >before eating or putting your fingers in your mouth.
                          >We learned this in kindergarten to reduce the spread
                          >of viruses and bacteria, but it's also a good practice
                          >throughout adult life too, especially if you're a
                          >letterpress printer and want to have a lead-free life!
                          >
                          >3. If there is a lot of the lead carbonate dust left
                          >in a type case, don't blow on it or otherwise stir it
                          >up and breathe it...because the dust will collect in
                          >the mucous membranes of your airways and mouth and you
                          >will eventually wind up swallowing some of it... and
                          >once swallowed it is in your stomach and eventually
                          >into your bloodstream.
                          >
                          >OK. Here's what I do when I obtain used type to reduce
                          >and practically eliminate all of these risks...
                          >
                          >I like to carefully take all of the type out of the
                          >case that I receive it in, and then, using rubber
                          >gloves, soak and gently bathe and brush the type in a
                          >bathe of mineral spirits (paint thinner)using an old
                          >toothbrush to remove most of any residual lead
                          >carbonate dust and other debris. Remember to only
                          >brush the type when it's thoroughly submerged or at
                          >least covered with wet solvent so that none of the dry
                          >lead carbonate can fly into the air.
                          >
                          >Some people have also suggested using vinegar (mild
                          >acetic acid) to remove the lead carbonate. This
                          >certainly works...just remember to wash the type
                          >afterward with lots of clear running water to remove
                          >any residual acetic acid, or in some way neutralize
                          >any remaining acetic acid before returning the type to
                          >the case (maybe with a mild baking soda solution
                          >followed by a water rinse???). Otherwise the presence
                          >of residual acid on the type will actually accelerate
                          >the formation of more new lead carbonate after you
                          >have just gone to great lengths to removed it!).
                          >
                          >I then carefully vacuum the type case using my shop
                          >vac and avoid breathing any dust. Wearing a dust mask
                          >during this process would probably be a good idea too,
                          >although I confess that I have never done so. I just
                          >make sure the vacuum is sucking up the dust so that
                          >it's not getting kicked up in the air. I then take a
                          >rag dampened with water(lightly squeezed out so that
                          >it's just damp and not dripping wet) and slowly and
                          >carefully wipe the compartments of the case to remove
                          >any residual dust that might contain any possible lead
                          >carbonate. I let the case dry thoroughly, then re-lay
                          >the case with the clean type into the clean
                          >compartments.
                          >
                          >As I mentioned in earlier posts, if you continue to
                          >clean your type after each use on the press with a
                          >mild solvent like kerosene or mineral spirits, you
                          >will coat the type with a mild residual film which
                          >will help prevent any further corrosion.
                          >
                          >So now that the type and case are cleaned, what do you
                          >do with the lead carbonate that you've removed??
                          >
                          >Well, if you have followed the process above, the lead
                          >carbonate will be in solution with the solvent or with
                          >the vinegar that you used to clean the type, or in
                          >your shop vac after vacuuming the cases, or in the
                          >water that you used to rinse the vinegar off the type,
                          >or on the damp rag that you used to wipe out the
                          >cases...and then what do you do with it??
                          >
                          >That's a tough question, because in most cases there
                          >is very little lead carbonate present in the first
                          >place and you can barely see it on most of the used
                          >type you obtain In other instances, where it is
                          >clearly visible on the type, it is difficult to see it
                          >when it is removed and in a liquid solution. So my
                          >admonishment is to just do your best to keep as much
                          >of it as possible from getting airborne and by keeping
                          >as much of it as possible out of the landfill. Do this
                          >by containing it in plastic bags, jars, etc....and
                          >taking it to your nearest toxic waste disposal site
                          >when you need to...along with batteries and other
                          >items containing toxic metals. They may look at you a
                          >little funny, but hey, they have ways of dealing with
                          >it that you don't. Just clearly label it (Lead
                          >carbonate in vinegar/Lead carbonate in water, etc.)
                          >and hand it over.
                          >
                          >Or, if you just can't get a grip on all of this, there
                          >is always photopolymer!
                          >
                          >Does this help?
                          >
                          >--Steve
                          >
                          >Steve Robison
                          >Robison Press
                          >Belmont, CA (about 25 miles south of San Francisco)
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >Steve Robison
                          >robisonsteve@...
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >____________________________________________________________________________________
                          >Need a vacation? Get great deals
                          >to amazing places on Yahoo! Travel.
                          >http://travel.yahoo.com/
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.