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Re: Ink prefs

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  • Gerald Lange
    ... Dear David I m not sure that you can make too much of anything here. If you have a question there is a need to know. I don t know what a grind gauge is
    Message 1 of 14 , Sep 6, 2001
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      --- In PPLetterpress@y..., "David Glover" <dglover@g...> wrote:
      > So, how can you tell if you have a "heavy bodied" ink.
      > If you use a grind guage, what readings does it have to show?
      >
      > Am I making too much of this?

      Dear David

      I'm not sure that you can make "too much" of anything here. If you
      have a question there is a need to know. I don't know what a grind
      gauge is or actually how useful that may be in non-industrial usage
      (just guessing).

      As an advocate of "normative principles," I'm all for some gadget that
      will guarantee this or that but I'm not sure that any answer here is a
      quick fix.

      After all the PP, you are still left with the basics of letterpress. I
      suspect we are a bit heavy on the prepress aspect here but somewhat
      ignore presswork. From the get go I wondered if we'd ever talk about
      "letterpress" here because its somewhat assumed that anyone exploring
      PP and other techniques already knows their stuff.

      In this regard, I am concerned about a new generation of letterpress
      printing "advocates" who do not know their "stuff," and lets say, who
      will never have set metal type by hand. I talked to the head of a
      letterpress studio (which had a photopolymer plate processing machine)
      and I was told offhandedly that the students only use the metal type
      to initially set their names in a composing stick. Then on to the
      computer. This is a mistake. Here the process is not seen as the
      "saving grace" of letterpress, it is seen as the easy way out. Make
      the plate, smash it into the paper. Presto. Letterpress. Is this its
      artificial end?

      But...ink (let's get back to that Ger), I can explain a heavy bodied
      ink as opposed to a thin bodied ink etc but ultimately, its an
      experiential thing. I could tell you this or that and so what?. As can
      anyone else. What you might want to do is check out the work of
      printers you admire. What do they use? And more importantly, how do
      they use it? Personally, I want to know what ink Victor Hammer used.
      The additional problem, of course, is how does one emulate the craft
      concerns of Victor Hammer when one is not Victor Hammer?

      Good night
    • Gerald Lange
      ... Dear Bryce How do you coat the polymer for rubber based inks? What do you use to do this? I d never heard this before—that rubber based inks won t
      Message 2 of 14 , Sep 6, 2001
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        bjorn@b... wrote:

        > ....If you are using polymer, rubber based ink won't stick to the
        > surface, so I've always avoided it. But I've heard from a friend that
        > if you get the matte surface plates that rubber will work, or if you
        > coat the surface of the plate and then let it dry....
        >

        > Bryce Knudson
        > Bjorn Press
        >

        Dear Bryce

        How do you "coat" the polymer for rubber based inks? What do you use
        to do this?


        I'd never heard this before—that rubber based inks won't stick to
        photopolymer. By rubber-based inks are you talking about the older Van
        Son type formulation? Most inks being produced today are hybrids of
        sorts. Hard to say if any one ink consists solely of rubber or oil.
        Unless you go back to old formula.

        Recently I had Handschy make up a batch of collotype ink from an old
        formula. They hadn't made the ink in over ten years. So ink companies
        can do this for you, but, of course, you pay a very steep price.
        Normally I've always avoided mixing inks based on different formula
        but for the collotype we had to use a variety of inks to give us an
        immediate fix for viscosity alteration (needed to counteract
        fluctuation in atmospheric pressure/temperature/humidity—bit of a
        different animal) during the print run, and one of these was the old
        tried and true Van Son rubber base 10850.

        I got so used to using it for altering viscosity that when I recently
        printed a broadside I mixed the Van Son with a stone litho ink
        (heavily pigmented/high viscosity), which I use for most of my work,
        and noticed odd "splinters" of ink on the polymer printing surface. I
        assume this is a failure of the inks to coalesce. Or perhaps, as you
        suggest, rubber based inks react differently to photopolymer? The
        pick-up to the printed sheet didn't reveal the "splinters" but there
        was an odd sparkle to the black.


        Anyone know a bit more about this?


        [Wonder if some company somewhere holds the formula for the Mandlik
        black that was labeled for letterpress printing on dampened paper?
        This was the ink Lewis Allen recommended in Printing With the
        Handpress.]


        Ger> .
      • Gerald Lange
        Hi Mark Well, you have me sitting on my hands with this one. Do you know what the ingredients are? Who is the manufacturer, and what is the brand name?
        Message 3 of 14 , Sep 6, 2001
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          Hi Mark

          Well, you have me sitting on my hands with this one. Do you know what the
          ingredients are? Who is the manufacturer, and what is the brand name?
          Especially interested because you use it for hand-litho. Don't do hand-litho
          myself, but find the ink formulations are much better for studio-letterpress
          applications. Thanks!

          All best

          G


          Mark Attwood wrote:
          >
          > Hi Gerald,
          >
          > I don't know if anyone else has used this, but I use aerosol (I hope the
          > spelling is correct) a lot, as a modifyer in the ink, both for
          > hand-lithography and letterpress.
          >
          > It is a white powder, extremely light and fluffy, a bit like magnesium
          > carbonate, but makes the ink more bodied than mag. It is apparently so fine
          > that if you breathe it in it will end up in your blood! so what I do to
          > avoid breathing it in, is ask the ink manufacturer to mix it with tinting
          > medium until it is about the consistency of window putty, and then I use
          > that to body any ink I print with, and it really seems to work well.
          >
          > Mark.
          >
          > Mark Attwood
          >
          > The Artists' Press
          > Box 623
          > Newtown
          > 2113
          > South Africa
          >
          > Tel. +27 11 836 5474
          > fax. +27 11 836 6858
          > mark@...
        • Mark Attwood
          Hi Gerald, I don t know if anyone else has used this, but I use aerosol (I hope the spelling is correct) a lot, as a modifyer in the ink, both for
          Message 4 of 14 , Sep 7, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Gerald,

            I don't know if anyone else has used this, but I use aerosol (I hope the
            spelling is correct) a lot, as a modifyer in the ink, both for
            hand-lithography and letterpress.

            It is a white powder, extremely light and fluffy, a bit like magnesium
            carbonate, but makes the ink more bodied than mag. It is apparently so fine
            that if you breathe it in it will end up in your blood! so what I do to
            avoid breathing it in, is ask the ink manufacturer to mix it with tinting
            medium until it is about the consistency of window putty, and then I use
            that to body any ink I print with, and it really seems to work well.

            Mark.


            Mark Attwood

            The Artists' Press
            Box 623
            Newtown
            2113
            South Africa

            Tel. +27 11 836 5474
            fax. +27 11 836 6858
            mark@...


            ----------
            >From: "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...>
            >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
            >Date: Thu, Sep 6, 2001, 5:47 pm
            >

            > bjorn@b... wrote:
            >
            >> ....If you are using polymer, rubber based ink won't stick to the
            >> surface, so I've always avoided it. But I've heard from a friend that
            >> if you get the matte surface plates that rubber will work, or if you
            >> coat the surface of the plate and then let it dry....
            >>
            >
            >> Bryce Knudson
            >> Bjorn Press
            >>
            >
            > Dear Bryce
            >
            > How do you "coat" the polymer for rubber based inks? What do you use
            > to do this?
            >
            >
            > I'd never heard this before—that rubber based inks won't stick to
            > photopolymer. By rubber-based inks are you talking about the older Van
            > Son type formulation? Most inks being produced today are hybrids of
            > sorts. Hard to say if any one ink consists solely of rubber or oil.
            > Unless you go back to old formula.
            >
            > Recently I had Handschy make up a batch of collotype ink from an old
            > formula. They hadn't made the ink in over ten years. So ink companies
            > can do this for you, but, of course, you pay a very steep price.
            > Normally I've always avoided mixing inks based on different formula
            > but for the collotype we had to use a variety of inks to give us an
            > immediate fix for viscosity alteration (needed to counteract
            > fluctuation in atmospheric pressure/temperature/humidity—bit of a
            > different animal) during the print run, and one of these was the old
            > tried and true Van Son rubber base 10850.
            >
            > I got so used to using it for altering viscosity that when I recently
            > printed a broadside I mixed the Van Son with a stone litho ink
            > (heavily pigmented/high viscosity), which I use for most of my work,
            > and noticed odd "splinters" of ink on the polymer printing surface. I
            > assume this is a failure of the inks to coalesce. Or perhaps, as you
            > suggest, rubber based inks react differently to photopolymer? The
            > pick-up to the printed sheet didn't reveal the "splinters" but there
            > was an odd sparkle to the black.
            >
            >
            > Anyone know a bit more about this?
            >
            >
            > [Wonder if some company somewhere holds the formula for the Mandlik
            > black that was labeled for letterpress printing on dampened paper?
            > This was the ink Lewis Allen recommended in Printing With the
            > Handpress.]
            >
            >
            > Ger> .
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
          • Mark Attwood
            Hi Gerald, I don t know what the ingredients of aerosol/Arosil? are, but I first heard about it from someone at Smith College, USA, and when I spoke to the
            Message 5 of 14 , Sep 7, 2001
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              Hi Gerald,

              I don't know what the ingredients of aerosol/Arosil? are, but I first heard
              about it from someone at Smith College, USA, and when I spoke to the local
              Johannesburg ink manufacturers (two different ones), they knew exactly what
              I was talking about, and could give me what I wanted.

              Let me know if you find out the correct name!

              regards,
              Mark.



              Mark Attwood

              The Artists' Press
              Box 623
              Newtown
              2113
              South Africa

              Tel. +27 11 836 5474
              fax. +27 11 836 6858
              mark@...


              ----------
              >From: Gerald Lange <bieler@...>
              >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
              >Date: Fri, Sep 7, 2001, 6:21 am
              >

              > Hi Mark
              >
              > Well, you have me sitting on my hands with this one. Do you know what the
              > ingredients are? Who is the manufacturer, and what is the brand name?
              > Especially interested because you use it for hand-litho. Don't do hand-litho
              > myself, but find the ink formulations are much better for studio-letterpress
              > applications. Thanks!
              >
              > All best
              >
              > G
              >
              >
              > Mark Attwood wrote:
              >>
              >> Hi Gerald,
              >>
              >> I don't know if anyone else has used this, but I use aerosol (I hope the
              >> spelling is correct) a lot, as a modifyer in the ink, both for
              >> hand-lithography and letterpress.
              >>
              >> It is a white powder, extremely light and fluffy, a bit like magnesium
              >> carbonate, but makes the ink more bodied than mag. It is apparently so fine
              >> that if you breathe it in it will end up in your blood! so what I do to
              >> avoid breathing it in, is ask the ink manufacturer to mix it with tinting
              >> medium until it is about the consistency of window putty, and then I use
              >> that to body any ink I print with, and it really seems to work well.
              >>
              >> Mark.
              >>
              >> Mark Attwood
              >>
              >> The Artists' Press
              >> Box 623
              >> Newtown
              >> 2113
              >> South Africa
              >>
              >> Tel. +27 11 836 5474
              >> fax. +27 11 836 6858
              >> mark@...
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
            • Katie Harper
              Dear Mark and Chris: I m used to mag carbonate but have not heard about the products that you like that add extra body to inks. My question is this: do they
              Message 6 of 14 , Sep 9, 2001
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                Dear Mark and Chris:

                I'm used to mag carbonate but have not heard about the products that you
                like that add extra body to inks. My question is this: do they add any color
                at all? Seems like something like the white Chris describes or even the
                "window putty" that Mark likes would also tend to change the color of the
                ink that it is mixed with.

                I just purchased an entire letterpress shop that includes, among many other
                wonderful things, cans and cans and cans of ink, mostly in 5# cans, all
                sealed as new. I have no idea what type of ink they contain, but I suspect
                that the guy who owned the shop I purchased probably himself purchased
                another letterpress shop going out of business, although these could well be
                offset inks. Most were packed about 1990-91. One description, for example,
                from the Wickoff Color Corporation, is for PMS 279 Blue Wax Free. Does
                anyone know what type of ink this is?

                Katie Harper




                Remember: Book arts will save the world!



                > From: "Mark Attwood" <mark@...>
                > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Fri, 07 Sep 2001 14:37:31 +0000
                > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
                >
                > Hi Gerald,
                >
                > I don't know what the ingredients of aerosol/Arosil? are, but I first heard
                > about it from someone at Smith College, USA, and when I spoke to the local
                > Johannesburg ink manufacturers (two different ones), they knew exactly what
                > I was talking about, and could give me what I wanted.
                >
                > Let me know if you find out the correct name!
                >
                > regards,
                > Mark.
                >
                >
                >
                > Mark Attwood
                >
                > The Artists' Press
                > Box 623
                > Newtown
                > 2113
                > South Africa
                >
                > Tel. +27 11 836 5474
                > fax. +27 11 836 6858
                > mark@...
                >
                >
                > ----------
                >> From: Gerald Lange <bieler@...>
                >> To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                >> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
                >> Date: Fri, Sep 7, 2001, 6:21 am
                >>
                >
                >> Hi Mark
                >>
                >> Well, you have me sitting on my hands with this one. Do you know what the
                >> ingredients are? Who is the manufacturer, and what is the brand name?
                >> Especially interested because you use it for hand-litho. Don't do hand-litho
                >> myself, but find the ink formulations are much better for studio-letterpress
                >> applications. Thanks!
                >>
                >> All best
                >>
                >> G
                >>
                >>
                >> Mark Attwood wrote:
                >>>
                >>> Hi Gerald,
                >>>
                >>> I don't know if anyone else has used this, but I use aerosol (I hope the
                >>> spelling is correct) a lot, as a modifyer in the ink, both for
                >>> hand-lithography and letterpress.
                >>>
                >>> It is a white powder, extremely light and fluffy, a bit like magnesium
                >>> carbonate, but makes the ink more bodied than mag. It is apparently so fine
                >>> that if you breathe it in it will end up in your blood! so what I do to
                >>> avoid breathing it in, is ask the ink manufacturer to mix it with tinting
                >>> medium until it is about the consistency of window putty, and then I use
                >>> that to body any ink I print with, and it really seems to work well.
                >>>
                >>> Mark.
                >>>
                >>> Mark Attwood
                >>>
                >>> The Artists' Press
                >>> Box 623
                >>> Newtown
                >>> 2113
                >>> South Africa
                >>>
                >>> Tel. +27 11 836 5474
                >>> fax. +27 11 836 6858
                >>> mark@...
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >>
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
              • flywheel@premier1.net
                Katie Yes, the LCC (Letterpress Conversion Compound) does change the color of the ink as well, but that s good. When you re trying to mix a PMS color, we
                Message 7 of 14 , Sep 9, 2001
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                  Katie

                  Yes, the LCC (Letterpress Conversion Compound) does change the color of the
                  ink as well, but that's good. When you're trying to mix a PMS color, we
                  almost always have to add opaque white to the mix in order to get the exact
                  match we want. We never use the trans. white that the formulas call for
                  because that only thins the ink to the point where the color isn't anywhere
                  at all what we want. The LCC was designed to bring the mixed color back to
                  where it should be for letterpress. If you follow the formula exactly as
                  written in the PMS books, you will never get your color match. Those PMS
                  colors as designed for offset printing which, obviously, puts ink down in a
                  whole different way than letterpress. The LCC works similarly to straight
                  opaque white only it's got ten times the body which makes for a wonderful
                  letterpress printing ink.

                  My guess about the PMS 279 BLue Wax Free ink would be that it's just regular
                  old oil base ink without wax (an additive that was put into ink in order to
                  reduce its tack and increase its flow). At least I think that's what it was
                  for. I am in no way an expert on ink, but I know what works when I see it,
                  and I've been looking for this LCC for years. I never had much luck with
                  magnesium carbonate and it doesn't work nearly as well as this LCC.

                  The reason I've been going on and on about this LCC is that I want to try
                  and help develop a market for it so that it will be around when next I need
                  to order it. The more people who buy it, the likelier its survival.

                  Chris Stern
                  Stern & Faye, Printers
                  Sedro-Woolley, WA
                  98284


                  ----------
                  >From: Katie Harper <knharper@...>
                  >To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                  >Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
                  >Date: Sun, Sep 9, 2001, 6:07 AM
                  >

                  > Dear Mark and Chris:
                  >
                  > I'm used to mag carbonate but have not heard about the products that you
                  > like that add extra body to inks. My question is this: do they add any color
                  > at all? Seems like something like the white Chris describes or even the
                  > "window putty" that Mark likes would also tend to change the color of the
                  > ink that it is mixed with.
                  >
                  > I just purchased an entire letterpress shop that includes, among many other
                  > wonderful things, cans and cans and cans of ink, mostly in 5# cans, all
                  > sealed as new. I have no idea what type of ink they contain, but I suspect
                  > that the guy who owned the shop I purchased probably himself purchased
                  > another letterpress shop going out of business, although these could well be
                  > offset inks. Most were packed about 1990-91. One description, for example,
                  > from the Wickoff Color Corporation, is for PMS 279 Blue Wax Free. Does
                  > anyone know what type of ink this is?
                  >
                  > Katie Harper
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Remember: Book arts will save the world!
                  >
                  >
                • Mark Attwood
                  Hi Katie, theoretically whatever additive you put in the ink should affect the colour, but I guess the amount is so small compared to the amount of pigment in
                  Message 8 of 14 , Sep 10, 2001
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi Katie,

                    theoretically whatever additive you put in the ink should affect the colour,
                    but I guess the amount is so small compared to the amount of pigment in the
                    ink that it is not noticeable, except for perhaps really light or
                    transparent colours.

                    Mark.



                    Mark Attwood

                    The Artists' Press
                    Box 623
                    Newtown
                    2113
                    South Africa

                    Tel. +27 11 836 5474
                    fax. +27 11 836 6858
                    mark@...


                    ----------
                    >From: Katie Harper <knharper@...>
                    >To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                    >Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
                    >Date: Sun, Sep 9, 2001, 1:07 pm
                    >

                    > Dear Mark and Chris:
                    >
                    > I'm used to mag carbonate but have not heard about the products that you
                    > like that add extra body to inks. My question is this: do they add any color
                    > at all? Seems like something like the white Chris describes or even the
                    > "window putty" that Mark likes would also tend to change the color of the
                    > ink that it is mixed with.
                    >
                    > I just purchased an entire letterpress shop that includes, among many other
                    > wonderful things, cans and cans and cans of ink, mostly in 5# cans, all
                    > sealed as new. I have no idea what type of ink they contain, but I suspect
                    > that the guy who owned the shop I purchased probably himself purchased
                    > another letterpress shop going out of business, although these could well be
                    > offset inks. Most were packed about 1990-91. One description, for example,
                    > from the Wickoff Color Corporation, is for PMS 279 Blue Wax Free. Does
                    > anyone know what type of ink this is?
                    >
                    > Katie Harper
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Remember: Book arts will save the world!
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >> From: "Mark Attwood" <mark@...>
                    >> Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                    >> Date: Fri, 07 Sep 2001 14:37:31 +0000
                    >> To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                    >> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
                    >>
                    >> Hi Gerald,
                    >>
                    >> I don't know what the ingredients of aerosol/Arosil? are, but I first heard
                    >> about it from someone at Smith College, USA, and when I spoke to the local
                    >> Johannesburg ink manufacturers (two different ones), they knew exactly what
                    >> I was talking about, and could give me what I wanted.
                    >>
                    >> Let me know if you find out the correct name!
                    >>
                    >> regards,
                    >> Mark.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Mark Attwood
                    >>
                    >> The Artists' Press
                    >> Box 623
                    >> Newtown
                    >> 2113
                    >> South Africa
                    >>
                    >> Tel. +27 11 836 5474
                    >> fax. +27 11 836 6858
                    >> mark@...
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> ----------
                    >>> From: Gerald Lange <bieler@...>
                    >>> To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                    >>> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
                    >>> Date: Fri, Sep 7, 2001, 6:21 am
                    >>>
                    >>
                    >>> Hi Mark
                    >>>
                    >>> Well, you have me sitting on my hands with this one. Do you know what the
                    >>> ingredients are? Who is the manufacturer, and what is the brand name?
                    >>> Especially interested because you use it for hand-litho. Don't do hand-litho
                    >>> myself, but find the ink formulations are much better for studio-letterpress
                    >>> applications. Thanks!
                    >>>
                    >>> All best
                    >>>
                    >>> G
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>> Mark Attwood wrote:
                    >>>>
                    >>>> Hi Gerald,
                    >>>>
                    >>>> I don't know if anyone else has used this, but I use aerosol (I hope the
                    >>>> spelling is correct) a lot, as a modifyer in the ink, both for
                    >>>> hand-lithography and letterpress.
                    >>>>
                    >>>> It is a white powder, extremely light and fluffy, a bit like magnesium
                    >>>> carbonate, but makes the ink more bodied than mag. It is apparently so fine
                    >>>> that if you breathe it in it will end up in your blood! so what I do to
                    >>>> avoid breathing it in, is ask the ink manufacturer to mix it with tinting
                    >>>> medium until it is about the consistency of window putty, and then I use
                    >>>> that to body any ink I print with, and it really seems to work well.
                    >>>>
                    >>>> Mark.
                    >>>>
                    >>>> Mark Attwood
                    >>>>
                    >>>> The Artists' Press
                    >>>> Box 623
                    >>>> Newtown
                    >>>> 2113
                    >>>> South Africa
                    >>>>
                    >>>> Tel. +27 11 836 5474
                    >>>> fax. +27 11 836 6858
                    >>>> mark@...
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >>>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >>
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                  • Katie Harper
                    Thanks to all who responded to my query about ink additives. When I was in graduate school as a printmaker, I once had a half day workshop on ink additives...
                    Message 9 of 14 , Sep 10, 2001
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Thanks to all who responded to my query about ink additives. When I was in
                      graduate school as a printmaker, I once had a half day workshop on ink
                      additives... I confess I wasn't as enthralled as I might have been, not
                      thinking it probably would be useful one day...

                      I also got another reply offline from Dan at Indian Hill press, and am
                      posting it here for those of you who were curious, as I was, about "Wax-free
                      inks."

                      Dear Katie:

                      Just got your bulletin on the Letterpress list.

                      Wax-free inks are important to printers who to do hot foil-stamping
                      on top of a printed surface. If the ink contains wax, the heat will
                      melt it and the foil will not adhere. Wax-free ink generally dries
                      very quickly, so don't leave it on your press overnight. It is also a
                      specialty ink, and more expensive than general job inks.

                      Best,
                      Dan Waters
                      Indian Hill Press





                      Remember: Book arts will save the world!



                      > From: "Mark Attwood" <mark@...>
                      > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      > Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2001 10:29:29 +0000
                      > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
                      >
                      > Hi Katie,
                      >
                      > theoretically whatever additive you put in the ink should affect the colour,
                      > but I guess the amount is so small compared to the amount of pigment in the
                      > ink that it is not noticeable, except for perhaps really light or
                      > transparent colours.
                      >
                      > Mark.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Mark Attwood
                      >
                      > The Artists' Press
                      > Box 623
                      > Newtown
                      > 2113
                      > South Africa
                      >
                      > Tel. +27 11 836 5474
                      > fax. +27 11 836 6858
                      > mark@...
                      >
                      >
                      > ----------
                      >> From: Katie Harper <knharper@...>
                      >> To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                      >> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
                      >> Date: Sun, Sep 9, 2001, 1:07 pm
                      >>
                      >
                      >> Dear Mark and Chris:
                      >>
                      >> I'm used to mag carbonate but have not heard about the products that you
                      >> like that add extra body to inks. My question is this: do they add any color
                      >> at all? Seems like something like the white Chris describes or even the
                      >> "window putty" that Mark likes would also tend to change the color of the
                      >> ink that it is mixed with.
                      >>
                      >> I just purchased an entire letterpress shop that includes, among many other
                      >> wonderful things, cans and cans and cans of ink, mostly in 5# cans, all
                      >> sealed as new. I have no idea what type of ink they contain, but I suspect
                      >> that the guy who owned the shop I purchased probably himself purchased
                      >> another letterpress shop going out of business, although these could well be
                      >> offset inks. Most were packed about 1990-91. One description, for example,
                      >> from the Wickoff Color Corporation, is for PMS 279 Blue Wax Free. Does
                      >> anyone know what type of ink this is?
                      >>
                      >> Katie Harper
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> Remember: Book arts will save the world!
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>> From: "Mark Attwood" <mark@...>
                      >>> Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      >>> Date: Fri, 07 Sep 2001 14:37:31 +0000
                      >>> To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      >>> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
                      >>>
                      >>> Hi Gerald,
                      >>>
                      >>> I don't know what the ingredients of aerosol/Arosil? are, but I first heard
                      >>> about it from someone at Smith College, USA, and when I spoke to the local
                      >>> Johannesburg ink manufacturers (two different ones), they knew exactly what
                      >>> I was talking about, and could give me what I wanted.
                      >>>
                      >>> Let me know if you find out the correct name!
                      >>>
                      >>> regards,
                      >>> Mark.
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>> Mark Attwood
                      >>>
                      >>> The Artists' Press
                      >>> Box 623
                      >>> Newtown
                      >>> 2113
                      >>> South Africa
                      >>>
                      >>> Tel. +27 11 836 5474
                      >>> fax. +27 11 836 6858
                      >>> mark@...
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>> ----------
                      >>>> From: Gerald Lange <bieler@...>
                      >>>> To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      >>>> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink prefs
                      >>>> Date: Fri, Sep 7, 2001, 6:21 am
                      >>>>
                      >>>
                      >>>> Hi Mark
                      >>>>
                      >>>> Well, you have me sitting on my hands with this one. Do you know what the
                      >>>> ingredients are? Who is the manufacturer, and what is the brand name?
                      >>>> Especially interested because you use it for hand-litho. Don't do
                      >>>> hand-litho
                      >>>> myself, but find the ink formulations are much better for
                      >>>> studio-letterpress
                      >>>> applications. Thanks!
                      >>>>
                      >>>> All best
                      >>>>
                      >>>> G
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>> Mark Attwood wrote:
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> Hi Gerald,
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> I don't know if anyone else has used this, but I use aerosol (I hope the
                      >>>>> spelling is correct) a lot, as a modifyer in the ink, both for
                      >>>>> hand-lithography and letterpress.
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> It is a white powder, extremely light and fluffy, a bit like magnesium
                      >>>>> carbonate, but makes the ink more bodied than mag. It is apparently so
                      >>>>> fine
                      >>>>> that if you breathe it in it will end up in your blood! so what I do to
                      >>>>> avoid breathing it in, is ask the ink manufacturer to mix it with tinting
                      >>>>> medium until it is about the consistency of window putty, and then I use
                      >>>>> that to body any ink I print with, and it really seems to work well.
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> Mark.
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> Mark Attwood
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> The Artists' Press
                      >>>>> Box 623
                      >>>>> Newtown
                      >>>>> 2113
                      >>>>> South Africa
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> Tel. +27 11 836 5474
                      >>>>> fax. +27 11 836 6858
                      >>>>> mark@...
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      >>>>
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      >>
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      >
                      >
                    • Terrence Chouinard
                      ... Chris I m guessing the LCC doesn t dry out your ink as fast as magnesium carbonate does. Any sense if this is the case or not? Terry Terrence Chouinard the
                      Message 10 of 14 , Sep 10, 2001
                      • 0 Attachment
                        > I never had much luck with
                        > magnesium carbonate and it doesn't work nearly as well as this LCC.


                        Chris
                        I'm guessing the LCC doesn't dry out your ink as fast as magnesium carbonate
                        does. Any sense if this is the case or not?

                        Terry


                        Terrence Chouinard
                        the Wing & the Wheel Press
                        Box 216
                        Aurora, New York 13026
                        315-364-6920
                        tpc@...
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