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Re: [PPLetterpress] inking

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  • Scott Rubel
    Sorry. I wasn t thinking about a Vandercook when I spoke about the bearings. I use C&P. Someone else will have to speak about the dangers of overpacking on a
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 6, 2007
      Sorry. I wasn't thinking about a Vandercook when I spoke about the
      bearings. I use C&P. Someone else will have to speak about the
      dangers of overpacking on a Vandercook. In my memory I think that the
      cylinder is held in place by opposing bearing wheels, in which base
      it would still be possible to ruin bearings or something. Some proof
      presses use only gravity, so it is not possible to ruin bearings, but
      I don't think this is true for Vandercook.

      Scott Rubel


      On Oct 6, 2007, at 5:07 PM, Bethany Carter wrote:

      >
      >
      > It is more difficult to damage polymer than lead type, but you can
      > still ruin the bearings in a press, so watch your packing.
      >
      > Hi Scott,
      >
      > Could you expand on this statement, particularly on how you can
      > ruin the bearings in a press? I'm sure there is such a thing as too
      > much packing; I print on a Vandercook 4 and the most I ever build
      > up the packing on top of the cylinder would be equivalent to 2, 80#
      > pieces of cover stock. Is this too much? I mainly print on 300 grm.
      > cotton paper, and using this thickness of packing gives a decent
      > impression, you can see it from the back of the paper but can't
      > read the words. Hope that makes some sense :) !
      > On another subject, does anyone have advice on when you should
      > have form rollers recovered, and how long they should last on
      > average? I had mine recovered a year ago (Rotadyne) , but I'm
      > starting to have the same inking problems that I had before I had
      > them recovered. Inconsistent inking, the bottom of my plate not
      > getting inked as much as the top, etc. I have printed a decent
      > amount this year, but I'm not using the press 7 days a week either.
      > Are there other things on the press I should check before I blame
      > the rollers?Just wondering. Thanks for any advice!
      >
      > Best,
      >
      > Bethany
      >
      >
      > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.comFrom: scott@...:
      > Sat, 6 Oct 2007 15:48:27 -0700Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] inking
      >
      >
      > In polymer, rollers have to be set to a higher accuracy. The reason
      > for this is apparent when you compare polymer with lead under a
      > magnifying glass (looking at it sideways). The sides of lead type
      > are perpendicular to the surface, while polymer is beveled.
      > Therefore, if your rollers are not perfectly round and set a little
      > too low, they will ink the "sides" of the type, making it print
      > fatter or blurry.As far as the actual skill goes, you won't have
      > the skill of setting type by hand, which I think is an important
      > exercise for learning good aesthetics, but that's okay. It sounds
      > like the class will be enough to teach you the operation of the
      > press.The only other difference I can think of right now is that
      > with type, you are setting a form that is usually not much larger
      > than the print area, so you don't have to worry about keeping your
      > guides and fingers out of the crash zone. When using polymer, you
      > are often attaching the printable area to a magnetic base that is
      > much large
      > r, and you have to use your head because you have greatly
      > increased your crash zone. When I was a beginner, I was taught to
      > start every setup by always moving my grippers as far right and
      > left as possible so that I would not forget to clear them later,
      > then move them back into use after the setup. I was also taught to
      > just remove all packing and start from zero and build up slowly so
      > I would never crush type. It is more difficult to damage polymer
      > than lead type, but you can still ruin the bearings in a press, so
      > watch your packing. Once you gain experience and you know your
      > equipment well, you will waste less time with these steps.I hope
      > this makes sense, but you'll learn all this in the class.Scott
      > RubelOn Oct 6, 2007, at 2:40 PM, lisaxdavidson wrote:> Hi, all,>>
      > Is the skill of inking metal type the same as that for polymer >
      > plates? I ask because if I take a> letterpress class it will
      > probably be all or mostly polymer, and I > wonder if I would have
      > to> change anything.>
      >> Thanks,>> Lisa>>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links>>>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >

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