Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: About Kissing...

Expand Messages
  • nagraph1
    I would agree with Eric that the ability to print at the same quality as the letterpress days of the Inland Printer still exists with cylinder presses like
    Message 1 of 92 , Oct 1, 2007
      I would agree with Eric that the ability to print at the same
      quality as the letterpress days of the Inland Printer still exists
      with cylinder presses like Millers, Miehles, and Heidelbergs still
      around and still being used to print with. The question of art work
      is one thing, but quality minimal impression--"kiss" is used in
      diecutting, and this is the first time I've seen it applied to
      letterpress--work as typified in the Inland Printer can still be
      done if there is demand for it. And as we all know, photopolymer is
      the answer for the perfect plate material, so any of the wildly
      complex plates used in the IP could certainly be duplicated in
      polymer, as well as traditional metal plates. A Heidelberg KSBA can
      easily handle 4-up publication forms with halftones, line, and type,
      even bleeds, and since the bulk of the IP was done on coated paper,
      the presswork would be doable on a real cylinder press. Transfer the
      same forms to a Vandercook, and you've exceeded the reason why these
      presses were built--primarily as proof and limited production
      presses, depending on model.

      There are still long run letterpress jobs that make sense and can be
      competitive with offset. My longest press run was for 80,000
      impressions 2 sides on 11x17 stock that was a work and turn printing-
      -that's 160M impressions, done on a Miehle vertical. Many of us have
      the equipment and the ability to pull this work off if we had to. We
      can't do Life, National Geographic, or Better Homes and Gardens, but
      the Inland Printer, in point of reference, was done on flat beds,
      from handset, Montotype, and slug composition, and not the large
      rotary presses the mass produced magazines used--those are all gone--
      the Hoes, Cottrells, and the like, and that era of printing from
      curved electrotypes is indeed gone. Many letterpress newspaper
      presses are still printing away everyday, but converted to flexo
      presses using photopolymer plates, and names like Hoe and Goss can
      still be seen in some newspaper plants.

      Fritz

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Lisa Davidson
      <lisaxdavidson@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi, Joe,
      >
      > I know, Eric Holub's name keeps coming up here, and then Gerald
      keeps
      > saying these things don't exist any more, but I think he must
      mean
      > "don't exist in mass quantity." Thank you for reminding me again.
      >
      > Lisa
      >
      >
      > On Sep 30, 2007, at 12:45 PM, Halton wrote:
      >
      > > Hi Lisa, The skills and equipment for the pre-press
      > > part of the history still exist in scattered locations
      > > around the country. This writer began a 6-year ITU
      > > apprenticeship in SF in 1956. Later I owned an
      > > advertising typography studio in SF til 1977, when I
      > > removed much of the shop to Alta Ca in the Sierra
      > > Nevada. Linotype, Ludlow, handset foundry, as well as
      > > wood type are alive and well in Colfax and in SF with
      > > Eric Holub and many other contributors to this site.
      > > Some are actively in business and others are enjoying
      > > the "black arts" for personal enjoyment . . . but most
      > > all of them have the skills!
      > > Regards, Joe Halton
      > > --- Lisa Davidson <lisaxdavidson@...> wrote:
      >
    • Lisa Davidson
      I m sorry, but what is the difference between trimming and cutting? ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 92 of 92 , Oct 3, 2007
        I'm sorry, but what is the difference between trimming and cutting?


        On Oct 3, 2007, at 12:46 PM, David Goodrich wrote:

        > At an APHA of NY meeting last night where we were privileged to
        > peruse a
        > number of volumes from the ATF collection in the Columbia University
        > Library, I found a small printed slip of paper inside the cover of the
        > Kelmscott Press' "Golden Legend" that read:
        >
        > IF this book is to be bound, the edges of the leaves should only be
        > TRIMMED,
        > not cut. In no case should the book be pressed, as that would
        > destroy the
        > "impression" of the type and thus injure the appearance of the
        > printing.
        >
        > W. MORRIS
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.