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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: About Kissing...

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  • Lisa Davidson
    Hi, Gerald, I see, yes. You re completely right, of course. What do you mean by A specific for instance would be photomechanical engraving of the range and
    Message 1 of 92 , Oct 1, 2007
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      Hi, Gerald,

      I see, yes. You're completely right, of course. What do you mean
      by "A specific for instance would be
      photomechanical engraving of the range and quality produced prior to
      displacement from lithographic techniques"? prior to displacement
      from . . . . sorry! if this means that litho techniques displaced
      photomechanical engraving, yes, is the photomechanical engraving
      simply not done anywhere now because it needs tanks of acid, etc., or
      can you still get it somewhere?

      Also, why is 1930's Inland Printer best? did it improve from 1920's
      and 1910's?

      Thanks,

      Lisa



      On Sep 30, 2007, at 3:36 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
      Lisa

      Good question I thought, but my reference was obviously to the type of
      production that went into the making of The Inland Printer at the time
      period indicated. I don't know of any letterpress produced trade journal
      of that quality produced in the last thirty years, if not the last forty
      years....
      *****



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Lisa Davidson
      I m sorry, but what is the difference between trimming and cutting? ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 92 of 92 , Oct 3, 2007
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        I'm sorry, but what is the difference between trimming and cutting?


        On Oct 3, 2007, at 12:46 PM, David Goodrich wrote:

        > At an APHA of NY meeting last night where we were privileged to
        > peruse a
        > number of volumes from the ATF collection in the Columbia University
        > Library, I found a small printed slip of paper inside the cover of the
        > Kelmscott Press' "Golden Legend" that read:
        >
        > IF this book is to be bound, the edges of the leaves should only be
        > TRIMMED,
        > not cut. In no case should the book be pressed, as that would
        > destroy the
        > "impression" of the type and thus injure the appearance of the
        > printing.
        >
        > W. MORRIS
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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