Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: The Optima "you can't have."

Expand Messages
  • Gerald Lange
    Lisa With the demise of the foundries there is no longer that option. This was one of the impetuses for the adaptation of the photopolymer plate process back
    Message 1 of 92 , Sep 24, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Lisa

      With the demise of the foundries there is no longer that option. This
      was one of the impetuses for the adaptation of the photopolymer plate
      process back in the late 1980s.

      At that time there was still a number of quality Monotype services
      around but foundry type was severely restricted in its offerings. To
      obtain a complete and working collection of a typeface like Optima was
      near impossible and even if possible, unbelievably expensive.

      You could easily buy a high-end photopolymer platemaking machine (or
      two) for the cost of a cabinet of new foundry type. I remember paying
      around $6,500 for about 30 rather full cases of new Monotype casting
      back in the early 90s. This was for a full ranging typeface with
      plenty of options for book text setting, small text, and display. I
      paid $16,500 for a similar configuration of "as new" second-hand
      foundry type.

      Obviously, new metal type was a significant investment, and quite
      restrictive in its potential for recouping the cost. The mass
      explosion of interest in letterpress is largely because the cost of
      participation is insignificant compared to what it once was. Used
      Vandercooks may, in some cases, such as the SP15, be approaching their
      original selling price, but the cost of letterpress production today
      is nowhere near what it once was.

      For someone who already has a computer, a press, and a flatbase, the
      cost of a digital font, film negative, and photopolymer plate is
      relatively inconsequential. Weirder still, film negatives and
      photopolymer plate processing are still priced at near what they were
      in the early 1990s. I used to pay $25 for film, today it is charged at
      $14. I compared the rates for an 8.5 x 11 inch photopolymer plate
      processed today and the price I was paying back in 1993, and they are
      identical.

      Gerald
      http://BielerPress.blotspot.com


      > Hi, everybody,
      >
      > Just out of curiosity, what would it cost to outfit a real type shop
      just for hand-set, just for
      > all the fonts that you would need for "ordinary" work? I think
      Linotypes and Monotypes are
      > a little scary with the molten metal; I just want plain old type.
      Is this even a possibility?
      >
      > Thank you.
      >
      > Lisa
      >
      >
      > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Peter
      > >
      > > Yeah the metal was the best.
      > *************I'm thinking we are screwed. We have put our
      aspirations in the
      > > wrong hands.
      > >
      > > Gerald
      > > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
      >
    • Lisa Davidson
      I m sorry, but what is the difference between trimming and cutting? ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 92 of 92 , Oct 3, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        I'm sorry, but what is the difference between trimming and cutting?


        On Oct 3, 2007, at 12:46 PM, David Goodrich wrote:

        > At an APHA of NY meeting last night where we were privileged to
        > peruse a
        > number of volumes from the ATF collection in the Columbia University
        > Library, I found a small printed slip of paper inside the cover of the
        > Kelmscott Press' "Golden Legend" that read:
        >
        > IF this book is to be bound, the edges of the leaves should only be
        > TRIMMED,
        > not cut. In no case should the book be pressed, as that would
        > destroy the
        > "impression" of the type and thus injure the appearance of the
        > printing.
        >
        > W. MORRIS
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.