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vandercook repair/trip mechanism/Boston area

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  • lisa_parula
    Hello, I have a Vandercook SP-15 with a broken trip mechanism. (it just suddenly stopped working while printing yesterday--no prior indications of problems).
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 22, 2007
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      Hello,

      I have a Vandercook SP-15 with a broken trip mechanism. (it just
      suddenly stopped working while printing yesterday--no prior
      indications of problems). Can anyone recommend a repair person in the
      Boston area?

      The trip lever is stuck on print, but the mechanism itself seems
      stuck on trip (i.e. it is not able to print.) I have looked at the
      manual, at info posted on-line and into the press itself, and am
      confused about how this mechanism works. (??? how the action of the
      trip lever is even connected to the parts of the trip traveling with
      the drum and rollers. . .etc.???) But I do understand that this
      possibly could be a broken trip spring, and when i look into the
      mechanism with a flashlight, I can identify the spring on the handle
      side of the press, but can't even seem to see that there is one
      present on the other side. ????? I would prefer to have someone who
      knows these presses come in and diagnose/fix the problem, but if this
      isn't possible, then I assume that it is something I will have to
      figure out myself. Any thoughts or suggestions?

      many thanks,

      Lisa Olson
      Parula Press
      Belmont, MA
    • Gerald Lange
      Lisa If the spring is not broken (look on the floor and under the press for pieces), you may be able to get the press back working with this simple trick. It
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 22, 2007
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        Lisa

        If the spring is not broken (look on the floor and under the press for
        pieces), you may be able to get the press back working with this
        simple trick. It sounds dumb, but it works and has saved many a
        harried SP owner. The mechanism may be tangled from short-rolling the
        press. Which you should never do on any of the SP models. The cylinder
        must be taken to the end of the press each and every time.

        Get yourself a big screwdriver and shove it up into the mechanism
        until it clicks over.

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "lisa_parula" <olslis@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello,
        >
        > I have a Vandercook SP-15 with a broken trip mechanism. (it just
        > suddenly stopped working while printing yesterday--no prior
        > indications of problems). Can anyone recommend a repair person in the
        > Boston area?
        >
        > The trip lever is stuck on print, but the mechanism itself seems
        > stuck on trip (i.e. it is not able to print.) I have looked at the
        > manual, at info posted on-line and into the press itself, and am
        > confused about how this mechanism works. (??? how the action of the
        > trip lever is even connected to the parts of the trip traveling with
        > the drum and rollers. . .etc.???) But I do understand that this
        > possibly could be a broken trip spring, and when i look into the
        > mechanism with a flashlight, I can identify the spring on the handle
        > side of the press, but can't even seem to see that there is one
        > present on the other side. ????? I would prefer to have someone who
        > knows these presses come in and diagnose/fix the problem, but if this
        > isn't possible, then I assume that it is something I will have to
        > figure out myself. Any thoughts or suggestions?
        >
        > many thanks,
        >
        > Lisa Olson
        > Parula Press
        > Belmont, MA
        >
      • YehudaMiklaf/MaureneFritz
        Can you tell me why one should not short run a Vandercook? -Yehuda Yehuda Miklaf Jerusalem fritzmiklaf@bezeqint.net [Non-text portions of this message have
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 23, 2007
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          Can you tell me why one should not 'short run' a Vandercook?



          -Yehuda



          Yehuda Miklaf

          Jerusalem

          fritzmiklaf@...





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • olslis@aol.com
          Thanks Gerald for your quick response and the tip.? Although my shoving was probably too timid to?untangle anything, while trying I discovered that there is
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 24, 2007
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            Thanks Gerald for your quick response and the tip.?

            Although my "shoving" was probably too timid to?untangle anything, while trying I discovered that there is a broken spring on the side where I could see no spring?before.? It looks like a big section is snapped off, but the mystery is that I can't find the that unattached piece anywhere on the floor or caught inside.?? So, here is a question--would the mechanism work with only one spring intact?? I wonder this because I just aquired the press recently and have been printing on it for only a?few days?--perhaps that side was broken when I got it and this other side is jammed??

            anyway, thanks again--I am going to follow Paul's suggestion and contact Perry Tymeson and keep learning as I go. . .

            Lisa Olson


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Gerald Lange <Bieler@...>
            To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sat, 22 Sep 2007 10:38 pm
            Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: vandercook repair/trip mechanism/Boston area






            Lisa

            If the spring is not broken (look on the floor and under the press for
            pieces), you may be able to get the press back working with this
            simple trick. It sounds dumb, but it works and has saved many a
            harried SP owner. The mechanism may be tangled from short-rolling the
            press. Which you should never do on any of the SP models. The cylinder
            must be taken to the end of the press each and every time.

            Get yourself a big screwdriver and shove it up into the mechanism
            until it clicks over.

            Gerald
            http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "lisa_parula" <olslis@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello,
            >
            > I have a Vandercook SP-15 with a broken trip mechanism. (it just
            > suddenly stopped working while printing yesterday--no prior
            > indications of problems). Can anyone recommend a repair person in the
            > Boston area?
            >
            > The trip lever is stuck on print, but the mechanism itself seems
            > stuck on trip (i.e. it is not able to print.) I have looked at the
            > manual, at info posted on-line and into the press itself, and am
            > confused about how this mechanism works. (??? how the action of the
            > trip lever is even connected to the parts of the trip traveling with
            > the drum and rollers. . .etc.???) But I do understand that this
            > possibly could be a broken trip spring, and when i look into the
            > mechanism with a flashlight, I can identify the spring on the handle
            > side of the press, but can't even seem to see that there is one
            > present on the other side. ????? I would prefer to have someone who
            > knows these presses come in and diagnose/fix the problem, but if this
            > isn't possible, then I assume that it is something I will have to
            > figure out myself. Any thoughts or suggestions?
            >
            > many thanks,
            >
            > Lisa Olson
            > Parula Press
            > Belmont, MA
            >





            ________________________________________________________________________
            Email and AIM finally together. You've gotta check out free AOL Mail! - http://mail.aol.com


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • nagraph1
            The trip spring, X-23790, is one of our stock items, and if the broken spring is the flat spring steel as opposed to the earlier coil spring, then you should
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 24, 2007
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              The trip spring, X-23790, is one of our stock items, and if the
              broken spring is the flat spring steel as opposed to the earlier
              coil spring, then you should have a pair on hand before Perry visits
              you--will save time and money. The SP-15 and SP-20 will both work
              with one spring broken, but not for too long because of the added
              stress put on the surviving spring.

              Fritz--NA Graphics

              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, olslis@... wrote:
              >
              > Thanks Gerald for your quick response and the tip.?
              >
              > Although my "shoving" was probably too timid to?untangle anything,
              while trying I discovered that there is a broken spring on the side
              where I could see no spring?before.? It looks like a big section is
              snapped off, but the mystery is that I can't find the that
              unattached piece anywhere on the floor or caught inside.?? So, here
              is a question--would the mechanism work with only one spring
              intact?? I wonder this because I just aquired the press recently and
              have been printing on it for only a?few days?--perhaps that side was
              broken when I got it and this other side is jammed??
              >
              > anyway, thanks again--I am going to follow Paul's suggestion and
              contact Perry Tymeson and keep learning as I go. . .
              >
              > Lisa Olson
              >
              >
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