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Re: Questions for C&P Pilot owners

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  • nagraph1
    I have the Cowan notebook that dates back to the 1920s that lists about every platen press ever made along with what could be done to make the Morgan Expansion
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 29, 2007
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      I have the Cowan notebook that dates back to the 1920s that lists
      about every platen press ever made along with what could be done to
      make the Morgan Expansion Trucks fit to various roller cores and
      presses. It looks like a lot of the presses can not use the Morgans
      even with modifications, and even in those early days, C&P, and
      later Kluge after 1930, dominated the platen market and most of the
      competing brands disappeared along the way. So the market was for
      the C&P and Kluge. But these were for metal type and traditional
      photoengravings and electrotypes, where the margin for error in
      inking is far greater than for photopolymer. I don't really
      recommend the Morgan trucks for use with photopolymer because of the
      tight tolerances in the plate height, and the uncompromising blank
      background areas of the finished plates, especially steel backed
      plates, and the bases that give little depth from the ink rollers.

      A hard truck, either metal or plastic works best along with
      adjusting bed rail height as these presses were work horses in their
      day and the bed rails are worn on all but the better grade Craftsmen
      presses, and probably the Kluges. Original trucks from C&P were all
      cast iron (Centrifically cast, then turned true on a lathe), and not
      steel, so there is wear there as well. But Cowan never made a model
      of the expandable truck for the Pilot.

      Fritz

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Scott Rubel <scott@...> wrote:
      >
      > I did not know that adjustable trucks aren't available for pilots.
      I
      > didn't recommend them last night because I am now using the nylon
      or
      > teflon trucks, which are not adjustable, for the first time. I
      have
      > always used adjustable trucks until this year, but I find that the
      nylon
      > ones, with a little masking tape buildup, is a better round than
      an
      > adjustable truck, and it seems like it will last longer than the
      truck
      > tire that begins cracking. --Scott
      >
      > nagraph1 wrote:
      >
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