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Packing questions

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  • g_mtch
    This is going to be long-winded, so please bear with me. I m new to this wonderful world of letterpress printing and I m hoping you fine printers out there can
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 12, 2007
      This is going to be long-winded, so please bear with me.

      I'm new to this wonderful world of letterpress printing and I'm hoping you fine printers
      out there can provide me with a few pointers.

      I own a C&P Pilot and am using a Boxcar base. For now I'd like to focus primarily on
      printing cards using heavier stock. I'm after the deep impression look that seems to be
      desired these days.

      I've been eyeing the list for the past few months and notice that there are varying opinions
      on what to use for packing . . . use mylar vs. don't use mylar . . . use anything lying
      around vs. only use materials specifically designed for packing, use soft packing for deep
      impression vs. deep impression can be achieved by using hard packing, never adjust your
      impression screws vs. it's ok to adjust these screws between jobs, etc. etc. etc.

      I definitely realize that much of this is personal preference and what works . . . works.
      However, being a newbie, I'm hoping to come to some kind of starting point . . . a baseline
      of sorts where I can learn the basics and then start experimenting from there.

      Other questions I have:

      What is fiberboard? Can I buy it anywhere or is there a specific kind of fiberboard for
      printing.

      How thick should my packing be? Is there a maximum? I've read that if I overpack the Pilot
      you'll get more impression at the bottom of the form than the top, so instead of
      overpacking, I should put some sheets behind the chase.

      Can I buy the various packing materials in Canada?

      Is there an order to how the packing should be placed in the press?

      If using mylar, does the mylar replace the tympan paper?

      Is it possible to achieve a blind emboss/deboss from headline type? Can I really get that
      much impression on my Pilot?

      I thank you all in advance. Any information would be appreciated.
    • typetom@aol.com
      In a message dated 8/12/2007, g_mtch@yahoo.ca writes: ...I ve read that if I overpack the Pilot you ll get more impression at the bottom of the form than the
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 12, 2007
        In a message dated 8/12/2007, g_mtch@... writes:

        ...I've read that if I overpack the Pilot you'll get more impression at the
        bottom of the form than the top, so instead of overpacking, I should put some
        sheets behind the chase...



        Hello g_mtch,
        The larger the press, the easier it would be to get what you want. The Pilot
        will be working at its limits to get a deep impression. The reason the Pilot
        will have more impression at the bottom than the top is because the platen
        is hinged rather close to the bed (on the 8x12 or 10x15, the hinge is all the
        way down at the floor). This means that as you add packing it will hit the
        bottom edge before the top edge can come together.

        Thus you will need to loosen the platen bolts at the bottom edge or tighten
        them at the top, to make allowance for the additional packing and the way the
        hinge moves the platen. This adjustment is rarely needed on the larger
        platen presses, but is frequently necessary on small presses as the packing is
        increased.

        (The situation will be the same, whether you add packing to the tympan or
        whether you add packing between the type-form and the bed. Both kinds of
        packing increase the print impression by positioning the type and the paper closer
        together, though packing behind the type also moves the type forward to hit
        the rollers harder, thus perhaps causing too much roller pressure over the
        form.)

        Your best bet will be to give it a try! I'd start with little or no
        packing, with just a ghost of an impression, and then add sheets (of whatever
        material) and watch the results. As the impression is made stronger, at some point
        you will notice the upper part of the image will become weaker as the bottom
        edge has more impression. That's the limit of adding packing without making
        adjustment by changing the angle of the platen. The answer is to experiment
        and keep your eyes open to what is happening!
        Best wishes,
        Tom

        Tom Parson
        Now It's Up To You Publications
        157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
        (303) 777-8951 home
        (720) 480-5358 cell phone
        http://members.aol.com/typetom



        ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
        http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Scott Rubel
        But then, putting sheets behind the form, you have to raise the rollers, too, plus it doesn t solve the problem of the altered relationship of the form with
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 12, 2007
          But then, putting sheets behind the form, you have to raise the
          rollers, too, plus it doesn't solve the problem of the altered
          relationship of the form with the platen. These are meant to be
          parallel when they come into contact at an exact point in each cycle.
          If you raise the form or put too much packing in, or both, the point
          of contact changes from the intention of the design of the press, and
          therefore will apply more pressure at the bottom than at the top. You
          can change this with careful makeready, or, if you intend to operate
          this way all the time, readjust the platen. This is just another way
          of saying what's already been said here, but the main point is that
          raising the form will cause the same problem, plus another set of
          problems.

          --Scott

          On Aug 12, 2007, at 11:56 AM, typetom@... wrote:

          >
          > In a message dated 8/12/2007, g_mtch@... writes:
          >
          > ...I've read that if I overpack the Pilot you'll get more
          > impression at the
          > bottom of the form than the top, so instead of overpacking, I
          > should put some
          > sheets behind the chase...
          >
          >
          >
          > Hello g_mtch,
          > The larger the press, the easier it would be to get what you want.
          > The Pilot
          > will be working at its limits to get a deep impression. The reason
          > the Pilot
          > will have more impression at the bottom than the top is because
          > the platen
          > is hinged rather close to the bed (on the 8x12 or 10x15, the hinge
          > is all the
          > way down at the floor). This means that as you add packing it will
          > hit the
          > bottom edge before the top edge can come together.
          >
          > Thus you will need to loosen the platen bolts at the bottom edge
          > or tighten
          > them at the top, to make allowance for the additional packing and
          > the way the
          > hinge moves the platen. This adjustment is rarely needed on the
          > larger
          > platen presses, but is frequently necessary on small presses as
          > the packing is
          > increased.
          >
          > (The situation will be the same, whether you add packing to the
          > tympan or
          > whether you add packing between the type-form and the bed. Both
          > kinds of
          > packing increase the print impression by positioning the type and
          > the paper closer
          > together, though packing behind the type also moves the type
          > forward to hit
          > the rollers harder, thus perhaps causing too much roller pressure
          > over the
          > form.)
          >
          > Your best bet will be to give it a try! I'd start with little or no
          > packing, with just a ghost of an impression, and then add sheets
          > (of whatever
          > material) and watch the results. As the impression is made
          > stronger, at some point
          > you will notice the upper part of the image will become weaker as
          > the bottom
          > edge has more impression. That's the limit of adding packing
          > without making
          > adjustment by changing the angle of the platen. The answer is to
          > experiment
          > and keep your eyes open to what is happening!
          > Best wishes,
          > Tom
          >
          > Tom Parson
          > Now It's Up To You Publications
          > 157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
          > (303) 777-8951 home
          > (720) 480-5358 cell phone
          > http://members.aol.com/typetom
          >
          >
          >
          > ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-
          > new AOL at
          > http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
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