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Re: blockmaking

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  • Gerald Lange
    Graham I think the best source for you would be _The British Printer_. This was an industrial journal that began about 1887. I suspect university libraries in
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 2, 2007
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      Graham

      I think the best source for you would be _The British Printer_. This
      was an industrial journal that began about 1887. I suspect university
      libraries in your neck of the woods might have a full run of it. I
      have a couple of bound annuals from the 1890s and they are jam-packed
      with information, with illustrations reflecting the processes used
      during the time period.

      I think the key in regard to the movement to photographic processes
      was the commercial availability of film. That coincides with Walker
      and Morris. Walker's seminal slide lantern show is an initial use of
      the technology. The further exploration of historical typeface
      specimens by the pair that resulted in the Kelmscott Press, is
      likewise the result of the industrial standardization of photographic
      processes. I'm not sure how much Walker was involved in the
      development of photo-engraving but, but as I recall, he was an owner
      in such a firm.

      In one of _The British Printers_ that I have the editors speculate on
      the production costs and profit involved in one of the Kelmscott
      books. They were "blown away," or the equivalent late 19th century
      expression.

      Gerald
      http://BielerPress.blogspot.com




      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Graham and Kathy
      <kwhalen.incline@...> wrote:
      >
      > Can anyone help me to find a book that gives details and dates of when
      > different methods of letterpress reproduction of pictures became
      available?
      >
      > I'm especially interested in when photographic methods of engraving
      became
      > available - electros I guess came from dabs of wood engravings, but when
      > could one get zincos made from line drawings? I know that Emery
      Walker was
      > involved in this development, but can't seem to find any factual
      details or
      > history.
      >
      > Thanks in advance
      >
      >
      > Graham Moss
      > Incline Press
      > 36 Bow Street
      > Oldham OL1 1SJ England
      > http://www.inclinepress.com
      >
    • Graham and Kathy
      Excellent suggestion - I ll see if I can track down a set without the big trek to London, and eventually report back somehow on what I find. All the best,
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 2, 2007
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        Excellent suggestion - I'll see if I can track down a set without the big
        trek to London, and eventually report back somehow on what I find.

        All the best,


        Graham Moss
        Incline Press
        36 Bow Street
        Oldham OL1 1SJ England
        http://www.inclinepress.com






        On 2/8/07 20:21, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...> wrote:

        > Graham
        >
        > I think the best source for you would be _The British Printer_. This
        > was an industrial journal that began about 1887. I suspect university
        > libraries in your neck of the woods might have a full run of it. I
        > have a couple of bound annuals from the 1890s and they are jam-packed
        > with information, with illustrations reflecting the processes used
        > during the time period.
        >
        > I think the key in regard to the movement to photographic processes
        > was the commercial availability of film. That coincides with Walker
        > and Morris. Walker's seminal slide lantern show is an initial use of
        > the technology. The further exploration of historical typeface
        > specimens by the pair that resulted in the Kelmscott Press, is
        > likewise the result of the industrial standardization of photographic
        > processes. I'm not sure how much Walker was involved in the
        > development of photo-engraving but, but as I recall, he was an owner
        > in such a firm.
        >
        > In one of _The British Printers_ that I have the editors speculate on
        > the production costs and profit involved in one of the Kelmscott
        > books. They were "blown away," or the equivalent late 19th century
        > expression.
        >
        > Gerald
        > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
      • parallel_imp
        ... available? Graham, according to a brief historical introduction to Modern Photoengraving (1948) by Flader & Mertle, the first relief etching was made in
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 2, 2007
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          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Graham and Kathy
          <kwhalen.incline@...> wrote:
          >
          > Can anyone help me to find a book that gives details and dates of when
          > different methods of letterpress reproduction of pictures became
          available?

          Graham, according to a brief historical introduction to "Modern
          Photoengraving" (1948) by Flader & Mertle, the first relief etching
          was made in copper by A. Dembour in 1823, and in zinc by Blasius Höfel
          in 1840. Firmin Gillot introduced a different method of zinc etching,
          transferring an image from a litho stone to the zinc as a resist, in
          1850.
          The first three-color relief halftone was done by Frederick Ives in
          1881, using a single-line screen, though they don't say specifically
          if this was photomechanical or not. The first photographic crossline
          halftone by Wm. Leggo was in 1869.
          --Eric Holub, SF
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