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Re: [PPLetterpress] Miehle V-36

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  • speedgray@aol.com
    Julie: A V-36 is a fine press. It is more basic than the V-45 or the V-50, yet does a fine job of printing. There are many differences between this machine
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 26, 2007
      Julie:

      A V-36 is a fine press. It is more basic than the V-45 or the V-50, yet does
      a fine job of printing. There are many differences between this machine and
      the ones you are used to. The biggest difference is the automatic feeder and
      delivery. The press will only run as good as the feeder is set-up, but once
      you master the feeder you will really enjoy running the press. Make sure that
      the voltage requirements of the motor are proper for where you will move it.
      The press can be moved easily with a pallet jack.

      I have run hundreds of thousands of impressions on a V-36, and it did a fine
      job. I was running mostly 60# coated one side label stock, but it seldom
      missed a sheet. I currently own a V-50. It is a bit "bigger, and more heavy
      duty" than the V-36. But, for your type of printing, it will do fine. You will
      also have to learn how to operate a "real" ink fountain, but that also will come
      with experience.

      You might want to check out MiehleVerticalWorld on Yahoo groups; that;s
      another place to get some answers to all the questions you will have.

      Go luck to you! I am sure you will find running the V-36 a pleasant
      experience.


      Speed Gray, APA 736
      Letterpress Green Sheet
      Ada, MI



      ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • juliemackenzie2003
      Thanks Speed. He has the ink fountain but doesnt use it, so I am sure I will need to figure that out. I need to go back and take a look. It seemed to me that
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 26, 2007
        Thanks Speed.

        He has the ink fountain but doesnt use it, so I am sure I will need to
        figure that out. I need to go back and take a look. It seemed to me
        that it seemed a bit cumbersome to get in and clean the ink off. But
        maybe I just didnt look close enough. I will be printing on mostly
        soft 140 lb paper like somerset or magnani pescia. Do you foresee any
        problems feeding that type of paper

        It is set up with a 220, so that sould be no problem for me.

        Thanks again

        Julie
      • speedgray@aol.com
        Julie: The ink fountain on all the various Miehle Vertical models is, in my opinion, the weak part of the press. Oh, the ink fountains work fine, but they
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 26, 2007
          Julie:

          The ink fountain on all the various Miehle Vertical models is, in my
          opinion, the weak part of the press. Oh, the ink fountains work fine, but they have
          a few strange quirks. First, when the feeder is closed and in operating
          position, the ink fountain keys are somewhat difficult to get at. You'll get used
          to it. Second, when the press is idling over, but the fountain roller is
          activated, it continues to feed ink into the ink train via the ductor roller
          regardless if the press is feeding sheets and on impression or not. Therefore,
          very quickly you will learn to flip off the feed mechanism anytime you are not
          feeding sheets so as to not over ink the form.

          The fountain roller is powered via a long arm with a cam follower on the
          end, which is driven by a cam on the main drive shaft of the press. This
          arrangement works very well, just make sure that since the fountain has been
          removed, all the pieces are there to put everything back together.

          Many Miehle Vertical owners remove the ink fountain if they are just
          die-cutting, numbering, or scoring. If your forms do not have heavy coverage, you
          can just "dab on a little ink" and that will work too, like you do on your C&P.

          Because the V-36 is a true cylinder press, the paper must "wrap around" the
          cylinder to feed properly. Usually, when you buy your stock, you will want to
          lay out the form with the grain of the paper running parallel to the cylinder
          and gripper (long grain). However, is the paper is not "too" heavy, then
          running the grain short (snap grain) is okay too. There are some wheels under
          the transfer board to hold the sheet against the cylinder as the press is
          running to keep from marking the tail end of the sheet.

          You should remove the packing from the cylinder and check the condition. If
          the press has been used (or abused) for diecutting without a jacket, then the
          cylinder surface will have deep cuts in it. This should cause you to
          immediately "walk away." Light marks are okay, but the cylinder should be flat, no
          deep pitted rust marks, and not caved in as if the form had pied when the
          press was running (smash-up). It is acceptable to clean up the cylinder with some
          light emery if it's not too bad. The press requires .050 packing, and that
          can cover some flaws in the cylinder.

          The V-36 has a manual lubrication system. This press is also very old. I
          believe the V-36 press was phased out in the mid-30's when the V-45s were
          introduced. Just make sure the press turns over smoothly, that the bed ways are not
          scored, and that all parts move freely. You should be able to turn the press
          over easily by hand just by grabbing the flywheel on the side. Printers are
          notorious for not following prescribed lubrication recommendations. This
          press has certainly seen some abuse just because it is as old as it is.

          A good friend had two V-36s till he retired a year or so ago. Both were nice
          a tight, well cared for, and ran like dreams. Good V-36s are great presses.
          Poor ones are trash.

          I don't mean to stick my nose in your business, but a good price for a
          "nice" V-36 would be $500 or less. Free is better. I have been "given" V-36s and
          V-50s several times in the recent past, and have turned down many more. I just
          said "no" to a V-50 for $300. So, don't pay too much! Now, if the price
          includes some "training" by the owner for you, or moving the press, that's another
          matter.

          As Miehle liked to say in the advertisements years ago, that the Miehle
          Vertical made many printers rich people. It's a wonderful job press.

          Let me know what else you need to know.

          Best,

          Speed



          ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
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        • Scott Rubel
          I used to have a V-36 and thought it was great. I found myself doing a lot of work, however, that a cylinder cannot do, like tissue over a big form will
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 26, 2007
            I used to have a V-36 and thought it was great. I found myself doing
            a lot of work, however, that a cylinder cannot do, like tissue over a
            big form will distort, and of course if the paper is really stiff it
            won't go around a cylinder. It's a fine press, though, and should
            never break.

            --Scott

            On Jul 26, 2007, at 1:10 PM, speedgray@... wrote:

            > Julie:
            >
            > A V-36 is a fine press. It is more basic than the V-45 or the V-50,
            > yet does
            > a fine job of printing. There are many differences between this
            > machine and
            > the ones you are used to. The biggest difference is the automatic
            > feeder and
            > delivery. The press will only run as good as the feeder is set-up,
            > but once
            > you master the feeder you will really enjoy running the press.
            > Make sure that
            > the voltage requirements of the motor are proper for where you
            > will move it.
            > The press can be moved easily with a pallet jack.
            >
            > I have run hundreds of thousands of impressions on a V-36, and it
            > did a fine
            > job. I was running mostly 60# coated one side label stock, but it
            > seldom
            > missed a sheet. I currently own a V-50. It is a bit "bigger, and
            > more heavy
            > duty" than the V-36. But, for your type of printing, it will do
            > fine. You will
            > also have to learn how to operate a "real" ink fountain, but that
            > also will come
            > with experience.
            >
            > You might want to check out MiehleVerticalWorld on Yahoo groups;
            > that;s
            > another place to get some answers to all the questions you will have.
            >
            > Go luck to you! I am sure you will find running the V-36 a pleasant
            > experience.
            >
            >
            > Speed Gray, APA 736
            > Letterpress Green Sheet
            > Ada, MI
          • nagraph1
            Some Miehle Vertical dates: V-36 introduced in March 1922, V-45 introduced late 1931 with serial number 7343, the pre-war version of the V-50 introduced March,
            Message 5 of 17 , Jul 26, 2007
              Some Miehle Vertical dates: V-36 introduced in March 1922, V-45
              introduced late 1931 with serial number 7343, the pre-war version of
              the V-50 introduced March, 1940 with serial number 11119. The post
              war model had several design changes. Serial number 15,000 was
              delivered in 1953. Then there was the X model, introduced about 1965-
              66.

              Fritz

              --- In , PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, speedgray@... wrote:
              >
              > Julie:
              >
              > The ink fountain on all the various Miehle Vertical models is, in
              my
              > opinion, the weak part of the press. Oh, the ink fountains work
              fine, but they have
              > a few strange quirks. First, when the feeder is closed and in
              operating
              > position, the ink fountain keys are somewhat difficult to get at.
              You'll get used
              > to it. Second, when the press is idling over, but the fountain
              roller is
              > activated, it continues to feed ink into the ink train via the
              ductor roller
              > regardless if the press is feeding sheets and on impression or
              not. Therefore,
              > very quickly you will learn to flip off the feed mechanism
              anytime you are not
              > feeding sheets so as to not over ink the form.
              >
              > The fountain roller is powered via a long arm with a cam follower
              on the
              > end, which is driven by a cam on the main drive shaft of the
              press. This
              > arrangement works very well, just make sure that since the
              fountain has been
              > removed, all the pieces are there to put everything back together.
              >
              > Many Miehle Vertical owners remove the ink fountain if they are
              just
              > die-cutting, numbering, or scoring. If your forms do not have
              heavy coverage, you
              > can just "dab on a little ink" and that will work too, like you do
              on your C&P.
              >
              > Because the V-36 is a true cylinder press, the paper must "wrap
              around" the
              > cylinder to feed properly. Usually, when you buy your stock, you
              will want to
              > lay out the form with the grain of the paper running parallel to
              the cylinder
              > and gripper (long grain). However, is the paper is not "too"
              heavy, then
              > running the grain short (snap grain) is okay too. There are some
              wheels under
              > the transfer board to hold the sheet against the cylinder as the
              press is
              > running to keep from marking the tail end of the sheet.
              >
              > You should remove the packing from the cylinder and check the
              condition. If
              > the press has been used (or abused) for diecutting without a
              jacket, then the
              > cylinder surface will have deep cuts in it. This should cause you
              to
              > immediately "walk away." Light marks are okay, but the cylinder
              should be flat, no
              > deep pitted rust marks, and not caved in as if the form had pied
              when the
              > press was running (smash-up). It is acceptable to clean up the
              cylinder with some
              > light emery if it's not too bad. The press requires .050 packing,
              and that
              > can cover some flaws in the cylinder.
              >
              > The V-36 has a manual lubrication system. This press is also very
              old. I
              > believe the V-36 press was phased out in the mid-30's when the V-
              45s were
              > introduced. Just make sure the press turns over smoothly, that the
              bed ways are not
              > scored, and that all parts move freely. You should be able to turn
              the press
              > over easily by hand just by grabbing the flywheel on the side.
              Printers are
              > notorious for not following prescribed lubrication
              recommendations. This
              > press has certainly seen some abuse just because it is as old as
              it is.
              >
              > A good friend had two V-36s till he retired a year or so ago.
              Both were nice
              > a tight, well cared for, and ran like dreams. Good V-36s are
              great presses.
              > Poor ones are trash.
              >
              > I don't mean to stick my nose in your business, but a good price
              for a
              > "nice" V-36 would be $500 or less. Free is better. I have
              been "given" V-36s and
              > V-50s several times in the recent past, and have turned down many
              more. I just
              > said "no" to a V-50 for $300. So, don't pay too much! Now, if the
              price
              > includes some "training" by the owner for you, or moving the
              press, that's another
              > matter.
              >
              > As Miehle liked to say in the advertisements years ago, that the
              Miehle
              > Vertical made many printers rich people. It's a wonderful job
              press.
              >
              > Let me know what else you need to know.
              >
              > Best,
              >
              > Speed
            • speedgray@aol.com
              Vertical dates. There you go Julie! Speed ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
              Message 6 of 17 , Jul 26, 2007
                Vertical dates. There you go Julie!

                Speed



                ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
                http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • bellky6030
                Memories, memories....I ran a V-50 many years ago (30+) at a label shop in Kalamazoo, MI. All our stock was pressure sensitive, from .003 chrome mylar to .010
                Message 7 of 17 , Jul 26, 2007
                  Memories, memories....I ran a V-50 many years ago (30+) at a label shop
                  in Kalamazoo, MI. All our stock was pressure sensitive, from .003
                  chrome mylar to .010 brushed aluminum to .005 white vynil. We used
                  mostly oil based inks but also ran some vynil based stuff that would
                  dry on the rollers while the press was running and took some really hot
                  solvent to clean.

                  We had one job that came in every 8 weeks or so. It was for a label to
                  go on a Lochinvar water heater: six colors, embossed, face-split, and
                  die cut on chrome mylar. All that for 300 run.

                  I remember the Meihle as a solid workhorse of a press; rarely had any
                  trouble as long as I kept it oiled.
                • juliemackenzie2003
                  Ahh.. Fantastic. Thats what I needed to read. I will go and take a good lookover. Things I get too excited about since its so close to home. As for price,
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jul 26, 2007
                    Ahh.. Fantastic. Thats what I needed to read. I will go and take a
                    good lookover. Things I get too excited about since its so close to
                    home. As for price, no worries about sticking your nose in. Thats
                    what I wanted to hear as well. I asked him the price and he said the
                    same price for 3 different items. I dont think hes knows what to
                    charge.

                    Thanks for the serial number reference Fritz. I will take a look at
                    that as well.

                    Thanks for all the help.

                    Julie MacKenzie
                  • Peter Fraterdeus
                    Hi Fritz This is the same press I noted a month or two ago. Still no luck getting the cylinder to turn when the core locking key is in place. I believe you
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jul 26, 2007
                      Hi Fritz

                      This is the same press I noted a month or two ago.
                      Still no luck getting the cylinder to turn when the core 'locking key' is in place.
                      I believe you mentioned the wooden bushings in this assembly.
                      I'm just wondering if there's any hope of getting this busted open, or if it's pretty much a lost cause...

                      The cylinder does turn if I remove the locking-key, but I don't know what the possible drawbacks of this would be....

                      Also, what sort of lubricant should go into the gearbox that drives the cylinder?

                      I drained the thing, and it is about the consistency of 30W motor oil (but black as pitch, I expect it had been in there for 50 years.)

                      many thanks for pointers!
                      ciao
                      peter
                      --
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                      >ARTQ: Help stop in-box bloat! Always Remember to Trim the Quote!<

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                    • Kevin
                      Hi Julie, I purchased a V36 a little while ago and have been teaching myself how to operate it (along with some very helpful tips from several Vertical
                      Message 10 of 17 , Jul 28, 2007
                        Hi Julie, I purchased a V36 a little while ago and have been teaching
                        myself how to operate it (along with some very helpful tips from
                        several Vertical operators on the letterpress lists/groups). I just
                        ran my first job on the press not more than a week ago. I die-cut
                        some envelope liners for an invitation project I'm working on and
                        things went very well for my first attempt ever at die-cutting. The
                        press was honestly pretty easy to set up. The die-cutting job was
                        pretty intimidating, but once I started going through the steps to
                        setup the job everything went very well. I'm really looking forward
                        to spending more time on this press.

                        Mine came with a die-cutting jacket but no ink rollers or the
                        brackets/carriages that the hold the rollers. I had to track these
                        parts down. It did have the ink fountain which is sometimes missing
                        on these presses.

                        One of the things I upgraded on my press was adding modern Bigfoot
                        suckers. NA Graphics has them: http://tinyurl.com/3472uo

                        If you do purchase this press I highly suggest the following books:

                        Catalogue Of Parts, The Vertical Press
                        The Miehle Vertical, Presswork Lessons For Students Of Printing
                        A Handbook For The Operation Of The V-36 Miehle Vertical

                        All of these books are specific to the V-36 and have been extremely
                        helpful. You will have to search for these books as they are all out
                        of print. I was lucky enough to find some for good prices on Ebay.
                        Other good places to look would be www.abebooks.com and www.biblio.com.

                        I just checked and biblio.com has the Catalogue Of Parts: http://
                        tinyurl.com/2kj5ow

                        abebooks.com has the Catalogue Of Parts and The Miehle Vertical,
                        Presswork Lessons For Students Of Printing: http://tinyurl.com/33ls4b
                        These two books alone would be a wealth of information geared
                        specifically to that press.

                        In all I've been very happy with the press and enjoy running it. I'd
                        be happy to offer any help/advise, just let me know.
                        Kevin.
                      • Kevin
                        The links I supplied in my post got messed up. Let me try them again: http://tinyurl.com/3472uo http://tinyurl.com/2kj5ow http://tinyurl.com/33ls4b I hope
                        Message 11 of 17 , Jul 28, 2007
                          The links I supplied in my post got messed up. Let me try them again:

                          http://tinyurl.com/3472uo

                          http://tinyurl.com/2kj5ow

                          http://tinyurl.com/33ls4b

                          I hope these don't break this time. If so, you'll just have to copy/
                          paste I guess.

                          Kevin.
                        • nagraph1
                          Here s a link to how the Big Foot feeder shoes are set up on a Miehle Vertical, in this case the V-50. I feel they work much better with less hassle than the
                          Message 12 of 17 , Jul 29, 2007
                            Here's a link to how the Big Foot feeder shoes are set up on a Miehle
                            Vertical, in this case the V-50. I feel they work much better with
                            less hassle than the original feeder shoes.

                            http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1282/936553051_4d48a85a4c_o.jpg

                            Fritz

                            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Kevin <kevin@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > The links I supplied in my post got messed up. Let me try them again:
                            >
                            > http://tinyurl.com/3472uo
                            >
                            > http://tinyurl.com/2kj5ow
                            >
                            > http://tinyurl.com/33ls4b
                            >
                            > I hope these don't break this time. If so, you'll just have to copy/
                            > paste I guess.
                            >
                            > Kevin.
                            >
                          • Lance Williams
                            Hey Fritz, You made me go check our serial numbers to see where we stood in line. All our presses are pre-War V-50 s. Serial numbers 11694, 11748, 12117 and
                            Message 13 of 17 , Aug 1, 2007
                              Hey Fritz,

                              You made me go check our serial numbers to see where we stood in
                              line. All our presses are pre-War V-50's. Serial numbers 11694,
                              11748, 12117 and 12318, respectively. All the presses were bought
                              new directly from Miehle.

                              We also have one post-war V-50 we picked up from the NYS School
                              for the Deaf in Rome back in the early 80's when they sold off all
                              their letterpress equipment (We got the V-50 and an Intertype for
                              $500).

                              - Lance Williams
                              Williams Stationery Co.
                              Camden, New York
                              APA #785


                              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "nagraph1" <nagraph@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Some Miehle Vertical dates: V-36 introduced in March 1922, V-45
                              > introduced late 1931 with serial number 7343, the pre-war version
                              of
                              > the V-50 introduced March, 1940 with serial number 11119. The post
                              > war model had several design changes. Serial number 15,000 was
                              > delivered in 1953. Then there was the X model, introduced about
                              1965-
                              > 66.
                              >
                              > Fritz
                            • nagraph1
                              Lance--what we are missing is a Miehle serial number list. We could start one with known serial numbers and the date they shipped. I found reference to a
                              Message 14 of 17 , Aug 1, 2007
                                Lance--what we are missing is a Miehle serial number list. We could
                                start one with known serial numbers and the date they shipped. I
                                found reference to a serial number like 15,000 in an Inland Printer
                                from about 1952 as Miehle sent out a press release. I should have
                                noted the numbers on the machines being put together when I toured
                                the Miehle plant in 1962, but that wasn't in my list of things to do
                                back then. I'm sure that there are Miehles out there with original
                                paper work, or manuals with the numbers and dates written in that
                                could give us a clue. The bulk of production was post war up until
                                the late 50s. I think with the X model, introduced because of the
                                check printers, that there was another surge of production. MICR
                                imprinting started in the early 1960s and the Miehle Vertical was
                                the press of choice and several hundreds of them went to Deluxe,
                                Harland, etc., and each of those companies had multiple plants
                                around the country.

                                Fritz



                                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Lance Williams"
                                <lwwill7999@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Hey Fritz,
                                >
                                > You made me go check our serial numbers to see where we stood
                                in
                                > line. All our presses are pre-War V-50's. Serial numbers 11694,
                                > 11748, 12117 and 12318, respectively. All the presses were bought
                                > new directly from Miehle.
                                >
                                > We also have one post-war V-50 we picked up from the NYS
                                School
                                > for the Deaf in Rome back in the early 80's when they sold off all
                                > their letterpress equipment (We got the V-50 and an Intertype for
                                > $500).
                                >
                                > - Lance Williams
                                > Williams Stationery Co.
                                > Camden, New York
                                > APA #785
                                >
                                >
                              • Lance Williams
                                Fritz, When we get to cooler weather here, I ll go upstairs in the storehouse (extremely hot up there in the summer), and I ll bet in one of the filing
                                Message 15 of 17 , Aug 1, 2007
                                  Fritz,

                                  When we get to cooler weather here, I'll go upstairs in the storehouse
                                  (extremely hot up there in the summer), and I'll bet in one of the filing
                                  cabinets up there are the original purchase invoices of the presses we
                                  have... If I can find them, it will be a place to start, anyway <grin>.

                                  - Lance


                                  > [Original Message]
                                  > From: nagraph1 <nagraph@...>
                                  > To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                                  > Date: 8/1/2007 9:23:04 PM
                                  > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Miehle V-36
                                  >
                                  > Lance--what we are missing is a Miehle serial number list. We could
                                  > start one with known serial numbers and the date they shipped. I
                                  > found reference to a serial number like 15,000 in an Inland Printer
                                  > from about 1952 as Miehle sent out a press release. I should have
                                  > noted the numbers on the machines being put together when I toured
                                  > the Miehle plant in 1962, but that wasn't in my list of things to do
                                  > back then. I'm sure that there are Miehles out there with original
                                  > paper work, or manuals with the numbers and dates written in that
                                  > could give us a clue. The bulk of production was post war up until
                                  > the late 50s. I think with the X model, introduced because of the
                                  > check printers, that there was another surge of production. MICR
                                  > imprinting started in the early 1960s and the Miehle Vertical was
                                  > the press of choice and several hundreds of them went to Deluxe,
                                  > Harland, etc., and each of those companies had multiple plants
                                  > around the country.
                                  >
                                  > Fritz
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Lance Williams"
                                  > <lwwill7999@...> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > Hey Fritz,
                                  > >
                                  > > You made me go check our serial numbers to see where we stood
                                  > in
                                  > > line. All our presses are pre-War V-50's. Serial numbers 11694,
                                  > > 11748, 12117 and 12318, respectively. All the presses were bought
                                  > > new directly from Miehle.
                                  > >
                                  > > We also have one post-war V-50 we picked up from the NYS
                                  > School
                                  > > for the Deaf in Rome back in the early 80's when they sold off all
                                  > > their letterpress equipment (We got the V-50 and an Intertype for
                                  > > $500).
                                  > >
                                  > > - Lance Williams
                                  > > Williams Stationery Co.
                                  > > Camden, New York
                                  > > APA #785
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
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