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Re: bringing the cost of plates down

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  • Casey McGarr
    When I design and print posters for either personal or client work I like doing linocuts. I always offer to my clients linocuts or photopolymer. What I
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 2, 2007
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      When I design and print posters for either personal or client work I
      like doing linocuts. I always offer to my clients linocuts or
      photopolymer. What I charge by the hour versus a polymer plate is the
      deciding factor. If I want the plate for a latter use in another project
      I'll usually do a linocut.

      If I design the piece I keep in mind that I may be carving it, if
      another designer designs it and has no concept of the challenges of
      letterpress printing I usually opt for a polymer plate or consult them
      to think about a linocut.

      I like carving type and images. I did a 4 color poster and all the type
      was knocked out of the background to the color of the paper. I about
      flipped. It was for my old boss at Fossil
      <http://www.inkylipspress.com/posters/images/tim_hale.jpg> and a great
      looking poster so I said what the heck. 10 hours later I was finished. I
      could have output plates and that would have been very costly.

      I have linocuts from the last 6 years that are still in great shape.

      Casey
      iLP



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Charles D. Jones
      I have greatly reduced the cost of using photopolymer by buying the plates by the case in the A3 size. I use a Xante Filmaker 4 for making negatives from the
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 2, 2007
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        I have greatly reduced the cost of using photopolymer by buying the plates
        by the case in the A3 size. I use a Xante Filmaker 4 for making negatives
        from the computer. Casey is right that sometimes it is better to use a
        linocut. I also have used blank zinc etching plates supported by a base for
        printing shapes and solids. I like the filmaker a lot as it produces a good
        opaque black.

        Charlie Jones
        Lanana Creek Press

        On 7/2/07, Casey McGarr <casey@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > When I design and print posters for either personal or client work I
        > like doing linocuts. I always offer to my clients linocuts or
        > photopolymer. What I charge by the hour versus a polymer plate is the
        > deciding factor. If I want the plate for a latter use in another project
        > I'll usually do a linocut.
        >
        > If I design the piece I keep in mind that I may be carving it, if
        > another designer designs it and has no concept of the challenges of
        > letterpress printing I usually opt for a polymer plate or consult them
        > to think about a linocut.
        >
        > I like carving type and images. I did a 4 color poster and all the type
        > was knocked out of the background to the color of the paper. I about
        > flipped. It was for my old boss at Fossil
        > <http://www.inkylipspress.com/posters/images/tim_hale.jpg> and a great
        > looking poster so I said what the heck. 10 hours later I was finished. I
        > could have output plates and that would have been very costly.
        >
        > I have linocuts from the last 6 years that are still in great shape.
        >
        > Casey
        > iLP
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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