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Question re uv exposure for photopolymer plates

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  • inkperson2002
    Hello- I read the interesting article in the latest GalleryGag about making your own photopolymer plates. I was wondering if anyone knows whether there are
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 14, 2007
      Hello-

      I read the interesting article in the latest GalleryGag about making
      your own photopolymer plates. I was wondering if anyone knows whether
      there are health and safety concerns regarding use of a uv-exposure
      unit of the sort described in the article or the types often used in
      silkscreening.
      Thank you!
    • Gerald Lange
      The article does not provide any detailed information about the UV lights that are used, nor how they are shielded nor their electrical hookup but this is a
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 14, 2007
        The article does not provide any detailed information about the UV
        lights that are used, nor how they are shielded nor their electrical
        hookup but this is a warning taken from Anderson & Vreeland's Oribital
        X manual:


        Under normal platemaking conditions, no special precautions are
        required for the ultraviolet lights recommended to expose
        photopolymers. However, direct exposure of the skin or eyes to UV
        light can cause burns. Wear ultraviolet limiting glasses if prolonged
        exposure to UV light, such as during equipment repair is required.

        Note: Light finishing tubes used to detack photopolymers emit short
        wavelength UV, which are especially damaging to the skin and eyes.
        Safety interlocks provided on equipment by the manufacturer should
        never be defeated. Direct exposure to short wavelength UV can cause
        serious, permanent burns to the skin and eyes.


        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "inkperson2002" <sjc007@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello-
        >
        > I read the interesting article in the latest GalleryGag about making
        > your own photopolymer plates. I was wondering if anyone knows whether
        > there are health and safety concerns regarding use of a uv-exposure
        > unit of the sort described in the article or the types often used in
        > silkscreening.
        > Thank you!
        >
      • newtype04@comcast.net
        The lights I use are GE, 16-inch UV Black Lights purchased at Wal-Mart or Lows several years ago. There are no hazardous warnings on the light unit. The
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 14, 2007
          The lights I use are GE, 16-inch UV Black Lights purchased at Wal-Mart or Lows several years ago. There are no hazardous warnings on the light unit. The lights are attached directly to my timer through a 120w household wall plug. These lights have no shielding, only the backs of the holders.

          Gerald´┐Żs advice is good. UV light is similar to that emitted by the sun, and can cause burns to the skins and damage to the eyes under prolonged exposure. Although the plate exposure time is brief under most conditions, I would recommend that the operator move away from the equipment while the lights are on as an additional precaution.

          Mike Anderson
          At Random Press



          -------------- Original message ----------------------
          From: "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...>
          > The article does not provide any detailed information about the UV
          > lights that are used, nor how they are shielded nor their electrical
          > hookup but this is a warning taken from Anderson & Vreeland's Oribital
          > X manual:
          >
          >
          > Under normal platemaking conditions, no special precautions are
          > required for the ultraviolet lights recommended to expose
          > photopolymers. However, direct exposure of the skin or eyes to UV
          > light can cause burns. Wear ultraviolet limiting glasses if prolonged
          > exposure to UV light, such as during equipment repair is required.
          >
          > Note: Light finishing tubes used to detack photopolymers emit short
          > wavelength UV, which are especially damaging to the skin and eyes.
          > Safety interlocks provided on equipment by the manufacturer should
          > never be defeated. Direct exposure to short wavelength UV can cause
          > serious, permanent burns to the skin and eyes.
          >
          >
          > Gerald
          > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "inkperson2002" <sjc007@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hello-
          > >
          > > I read the interesting article in the latest GalleryGag about making
          > > your own photopolymer plates. I was wondering if anyone knows whether
          > > there are health and safety concerns regarding use of a uv-exposure
          > > unit of the sort described in the article or the types often used in
          > > silkscreening.
          > > Thank you!
          > >
          >
          >
          >




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