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Re: [PPLetterpress] Advice on ink coverage

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  • Greg S
    Dampen the paper and let it set for a couple hours in a plastic bag. ... From: punkinsonparade To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, June 10, 2007
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 10, 2007
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      Dampen the paper and let it set for a couple hours in a plastic bag.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: punkinsonparade
      To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, June 10, 2007 6:33 PM
      Subject: [PPLetterpress] Advice on ink coverage


      Hello - Embarking on my first solo printing project with my new press
      and looking for advice on an ink coverage problem. I have a Model #1
      Improved platen press (5x7.5) and am using Boxcar base with
      photopolymer plates. The piece I'm working on printing has about 24-pt
      type at the top, and something like 10-pt type and a line drawing
      illustration at the bottom. I'm printing on handmade textured paper
      (Fabriano Medioevalis) and I'm having a heck of a time getting a nice
      even ink coverage across the piece. The large type prints fine and the
      small type and illustration print too light and broken, and clearly
      the texture of the paper has something to do with this. I would like
      to avoid switching paper for this project and am trying adjustments to
      makeready and adding ink and still results are not good. Any advice is
      very welcome.





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gerald Lange
      Hi This might sound silly but you might try to print the various elements separately. That will give you more control over the inking. That actually might be
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 10, 2007
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        Hi

        This might sound silly but you might try to print the various elements
        separately. That will give you more control over the inking. That
        actually might be less time consuming than fighting with the press and
        ending up with a less than satisfactory job. This is actually how I
        would do it; three runs—the idea is to have control over the press
        rather than having the press have control over you. Presswork is so
        much easier that way.

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com




        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "punkinsonparade" <gm@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello - Embarking on my first solo printing project with my new press
        > and looking for advice on an ink coverage problem. I have a Model #1
        > Improved platen press (5x7.5) and am using Boxcar base with
        > photopolymer plates. The piece I'm working on printing has about 24-pt
        > type at the top, and something like 10-pt type and a line drawing
        > illustration at the bottom. I'm printing on handmade textured paper
        > (Fabriano Medioevalis) and I'm having a heck of a time getting a nice
        > even ink coverage across the piece. The large type prints fine and the
        > small type and illustration print too light and broken, and clearly
        > the texture of the paper has something to do with this. I would like
        > to avoid switching paper for this project and am trying adjustments to
        > makeready and adding ink and still results are not good. Any advice is
        > very welcome.
        >
      • Jessica Peterson
        I agree, you have to do 3 runs, esp. with polymer type. DIfferent font sizes require different amounts of ink coverage, make ready, etc. ... [Non-text portions
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 10, 2007
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          I agree, you have to do 3 runs, esp. with polymer type. DIfferent
          font sizes require different amounts of ink coverage, make ready, etc.

          On Jun 10, 2007, at 7:51 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

          > Hi
          >
          > This might sound silly but you might try to print the various elements
          > separately. That will give you more control over the inking. That
          > actually might be less time consuming than fighting with the press and
          > ending up with a less than satisfactory job. This is actually how I
          > would do it; three runs�the idea is to have control over the press
          > rather than having the press have control over you. Presswork is so
          > much easier that way.
          >
          > Gerald
          > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
          >
          > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "punkinsonparade" <gm@...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Hello - Embarking on my first solo printing project with my new
          > press
          > > and looking for advice on an ink coverage problem. I have a Model #1
          > > Improved platen press (5x7.5) and am using Boxcar base with
          > > photopolymer plates. The piece I'm working on printing has about
          > 24-pt
          > > type at the top, and something like 10-pt type and a line drawing
          > > illustration at the bottom. I'm printing on handmade textured paper
          > > (Fabriano Medioevalis) and I'm having a heck of a time getting a
          > nice
          > > even ink coverage across the piece. The large type prints fine
          > and the
          > > small type and illustration print too light and broken, and clearly
          > > the texture of the paper has something to do with this. I would like
          > > to avoid switching paper for this project and am trying
          > adjustments to
          > > makeready and adding ink and still results are not good. Any
          > advice is
          > > very welcome.
          > >
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Russell Maret
          Hi, The problem you re having is in fact the opposite of what one would normally expect. Rather than the larger surface being light, or the smaller surface
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 11, 2007
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            Hi,

            The problem you're having is in fact the opposite of what one would
            normally expect. Rather than the larger surface being light, or the
            smaller surface being heavy, your large surface is fine & the small
            light. This would suggest that you are having one of two problems:

            1) Your rollers are not adjusted properly, meaning that they are too
            high over the 10pt type and probably just right over the 24pt type.

            2) Your plate was over washed & the thinner material has broken in
            the wash out unit.

            To diagnose the problem I would first check to make sure that your
            rollers are the proper height in all four corners of your platen. If
            they are, I would likely assume that the plate is bad. You can check
            this by inking it in a dark ink, direct a light source across the
            surface of the plate & look at it under a loupe.


            Russell Maret
            646-712-1784




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • typetom@aol.com
            Another possible explanation may be a difference of pressure on different parts of the form. I have not printed with the Model press, but with many small
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 11, 2007
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              Another possible explanation may be a difference of pressure on different
              parts of the form. I have not printed with the Model press, but with many small
              table-top platen presses, packing in one part of the form affect pressure
              elsewhere in the form. The reason is that the platen is hinged quite close to
              the form, so as packing is added it will bring the bottom edge of the platen
              closer to the type than the top edge. So to keep the platen parallel to the
              type and the pressure even, the lower bolts have to be loosened as packing is
              added (or the top bolts tightened).

              What I am suggesting is that as you adjusted the packing to get the larger
              type to print correctly, at the same time you were actually reducing the
              pressure on the other type.

              You might be able to check this by examining the back of the sheet - to see
              if all parts of the type form are hitting with the same pressure. If it is
              hitting harder at the edge closest to the hinge, this may be the trouble.

              Of course it could be any of a dozen other factors! -- ink, rollers, plate,
              backing block, paper, etc. Another common cause might be that the rollers are
              hitting the type ok on the large surface of the 24 point type, but actually
              squashing the ink off the surface of the smaller type (leaving weak inking on
              the small type but perhaps a rim of ink around the letters). The solution
              for that would be to raise the rollers, with tape on the tracks, so the rollers
              don't hit the type too hard.

              Or any of the other suggestions may be the answer.
              Multiple possibilities, multiple tricks.
              Best wishes,
              Tom

              Tom Parson
              Now It's Up To You Publications
              157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
              (303) 777-8951 home
              (720) 480-5358 cell phone
              http://members.aol.com/typetom



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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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