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Re: Boxcar Base

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  • parallel_imp
    Gerald, I should add that I m using these tools on Miraclon/Rigilon which has a fairly rigid metal backing. A more flexible back, as on Printight, can be more
    Message 1 of 28 , Apr 6, 2007
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      Gerald, I should add that I'm using these tools on Miraclon/Rigilon
      which has a fairly rigid metal backing. A more flexible back, as on
      Printight, can be more distorted by tools with a short cut (except
      maybe the nibbler, which supports the remaining material as it cuts,
      but it can leave a bit of a sawtooth edge). Cut Printight with
      tinsnips and it may get a lasagna-edge. As I said, these tools are
      useful but not perfect. And I can understand why some people prefer
      the ease of cutting plastic plates with scissors or xacto.
      But since I often mount small plates on lead high-base, the nibbler
      lets me trim a plate right up to the beard, butt it against foundry
      type, etc.
      Eric Holub, SF
      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...> wrote:
      > Yeah, I've got a zillion specialized tools for this, and dropped a few
      > more bucks tonight searching for that nibbler. Ah, Radio Shack, sort
      > of like going to Home Depot, except for the wait. Still junk when you
      > get it home though.
      >
      > I suppose this will irritate just about everyone but I'd recommend not
      > ever disturbing the length/width configuration of a plate, whether
      > steel-backed or polyester-backed. Except, of course, in the quick and
      > dirty or the desperate necessity. Why? The lay-down can easily get
      > distorted or twisted. Plain and simple.
    • Gerald Lange
      Just some information: Besides manufacturing magnetic flatbases and magnetic cylinders for the printing industry, Bunting actually makes non-magnetic cylinders
      Message 2 of 28 , Apr 7, 2007
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        Just some information:

        Besides manufacturing magnetic flatbases and magnetic cylinders for
        the printing industry, Bunting actually makes non-magnetic cylinders
        for use with polyester-backed plates—and has for a "lot" longer than
        "boxcar plates" have been around. They never manufactured a
        non-magnetic flatbase though, I assume, market-wise, they saw no
        industry support since non-magnetic flatbases were readily available.
        I had a bunch of the old plastic newspaper bases at one point, and
        they were also made from type metal and wood (I have some very precise
        aluminum combination base material that was manufactured in Germany).
        Those old AWT and ATF catalogs list all sorts of base material.

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


        > >
        > > By "boxcar plate," do you mean you are using a polyester-backed plate
        > > w/film adhesive on a Bunting Magnetic base? If so, what is the
        > > rationale?
        > >
        >
        > Yes we use polyester-backed plates w/ film adhesive (a whole lot
        > easier to say boxcar plate), but it's not on a magnetic base, its
        > just an aluminum base. I don't know why I said bunting.
        >
        > But, even on a magnetic base I would use boxcar plates (and have
        > before, on other people's setup) and just adjust the press
        > accordingly, for a number of reasons, though mostly for quick
        > registration (we tape the plate upside down to the paper, properly
        > registered, and then run it through the press).
        >
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