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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Boxcar Base

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  • Blue Barnhouse
    ... Yes we use polyester-backed plates w/ film adhesive (a whole lot easier to say boxcar plate), but it s not on a magnetic base, its just an aluminum base. I
    Message 1 of 28 , Apr 3, 2007
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      >
      >
      > By "boxcar plate," do you mean you are using a polyester-backed plate
      > w/film adhesive on a Bunting Magnetic base? If so, what is the
      > rationale?
      >

      Yes we use polyester-backed plates w/ film adhesive (a whole lot
      easier to say boxcar plate), but it's not on a magnetic base, its
      just an aluminum base. I don't know why I said bunting.

      But, even on a magnetic base I would use boxcar plates (and have
      before, on other people's setup) and just adjust the press
      accordingly, for a number of reasons, though mostly for quick
      registration (we tape the plate upside down to the paper, properly
      registered, and then run it through the press). Yesterday we had a
      last minute switch on a poster for a summer movie series-- the
      client wanted to change "last of the unicorns" to "the last
      unicorn." rather than order a new negative we chopped up the plate
      with scissors and rearranged the words. I would never attempt
      something like that on a steel backed plate.





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gerald Lange
      Brandon A Kutrimmer works quite well for precision cutting on steel-backed plates. I did have an occasion to correct a steel-backed plate in the manner you
      Message 2 of 28 , Apr 4, 2007
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        Brandon

        A Kutrimmer works quite well for precision cutting on steel-backed
        plates. I did have an occasion to correct a steel-backed plate in the
        manner you describe. Not something I'd suggest as common routine.

        Don't know though that I'd also suggest this as a qualitative measure
        for a polyester-backed vs. steel-backed kind of thing. That seems a
        bit silly. Quick and dirty fixes are just what they are, and I'd
        "hope" not a rationale for preference or practice.

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


        >
        > But, even on a magnetic base I would use boxcar plates (and have
        > before, on other people's setup) and just adjust the press
        > accordingly, for a number of reasons, though mostly for quick
        > registration (we tape the plate upside down to the paper, properly
        > registered, and then run it through the press). Yesterday we had a
        > last minute switch on a poster for a summer movie series-- the
        > client wanted to change "last of the unicorns" to "the last
        > unicorn." rather than order a new negative we chopped up the plate
        > with scissors and rearranged the words. I would never attempt
        > something like that on a steel backed plate.
        >
        >
      • Blue Barnhouse
        While kutrimmers are handy for cutting straight lines, I find the need to cut in curves or around particular items- which I have tried on steel plates with
        Message 3 of 28 , Apr 5, 2007
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          While kutrimmers are handy for cutting straight lines, I find the
          need to cut in curves or around particular items- which I have tried
          on steel plates with snips but the results are difficult to come by
          and often messy. As per quick and dirty fixes, while I'm a
          perfectionist like the rest of us- an end result I can be proud of
          is what I'm after and the number of paths I take to that result on a
          day to day basis are widely varied. In this instance the job was a
          favor and with a whole bunch of paying jobs waiting in queue, quick
          and dirty sounded mighty delicious.

          Brandon


          On Apr 5, 2007, at 12:59 AM, Gerald Lange wrote:

          > Brandon
          >
          > A Kutrimmer works quite well for precision cutting on steel-backed
          > plates. I did have an occasion to correct a steel-backed plate in the
          > manner you describe. Not something I'd suggest as common routine.
          >
          > Don't know though that I'd also suggest this as a qualitative measure
          > for a polyester-backed vs. steel-backed kind of thing. That seems a
          > bit silly. Quick and dirty fixes are just what they are, and I'd
          > "hope" not a rationale for preference or practice.
          >
          > Gerald
          > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
          >
          > >
          > > But, even on a magnetic base I would use boxcar plates (and have
          > > before, on other people's setup) and just adjust the press
          > > accordingly, for a number of reasons, though mostly for quick
          > > registration (we tape the plate upside down to the paper, properly
          > > registered, and then run it through the press). Yesterday we had a
          > > last minute switch on a poster for a summer movie series-- the
          > > client wanted to change "last of the unicorns" to "the last
          > > unicorn." rather than order a new negative we chopped up the plate
          > > with scissors and rearranged the words. I would never attempt
          > > something like that on a steel backed plate.
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • parallel_imp
          ... There are a variety of tools that will cut metal plates on an irregular path or a limited distance, but most will remove a width of metal. You can get a
          Message 4 of 28 , Apr 5, 2007
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            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Blue Barnhouse
            <letpresslist@...> wrote:
            >
            > While kutrimmers are handy for cutting straight lines, I find the
            > need to cut in curves or around particular items- which I have tried
            > on steel plates with snips but the results are difficult to come by
            > and often messy.

            There are a variety of tools that will cut metal plates on an
            irregular path or a limited distance, but most will remove a width of
            metal. You can get a "nibbler" at Radio Shack, and it takes a 1/16"
            deep by 1/4" wide bite, which can be started from a hole drilled in
            the middle of the plate; with practice, you can also use a jigsaw or
            coping saw or jeweller's saw for a thinner path. I also use little
            curved dental scissors, straight and curved tinsnips, and a French
            version of the nibbler (it says "cisaille" on the package). All are
            useful, none are perfect, and you'll need to file off edge-burrs. And
            I warn you, working with cut metal like this, you really should have a
            full first-aid kit and know how to make a butterfly bandage.
            E Holub, SF
          • Gerald Lange
            Hi Eric Yeah, I ve got a zillion specialized tools for this, and dropped a few more bucks tonight searching for that nibbler. Ah, Radio Shack, sort of like
            Message 5 of 28 , Apr 5, 2007
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              Hi Eric

              Yeah, I've got a zillion specialized tools for this, and dropped a few
              more bucks tonight searching for that nibbler. Ah, Radio Shack, sort
              of like going to Home Depot, except for the wait. Still junk when you
              get it home though.

              I suppose this will irritate just about everyone but I'd recommend not
              ever disturbing the length/width configuration of a plate, whether
              steel-backed or polyester-backed. Except, of course, in the quick and
              dirty or the desperate necessity. Why? The lay-down can easily get
              distorted or twisted. Plain and simple.

              Gerald
              http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



              >
              > There are a variety of tools that will cut metal plates on an
              > irregular path or a limited distance, but most will remove a width of
              > metal. You can get a "nibbler" at Radio Shack, and it takes a 1/16"
              > deep by 1/4" wide bite, which can be started from a hole drilled in
              > the middle of the plate; with practice, you can also use a jigsaw or
              > coping saw or jeweller's saw for a thinner path. I also use little
              > curved dental scissors, straight and curved tinsnips, and a French
              > version of the nibbler (it says "cisaille" on the package). All are
              > useful, none are perfect, and you'll need to file off edge-burrs. And
              > I warn you, working with cut metal like this, you really should have a
              > full first-aid kit and know how to make a butterfly bandage.
              > E Holub, SF
              >
            • parallel_imp
              Gerald, I should add that I m using these tools on Miraclon/Rigilon which has a fairly rigid metal backing. A more flexible back, as on Printight, can be more
              Message 6 of 28 , Apr 6, 2007
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                Gerald, I should add that I'm using these tools on Miraclon/Rigilon
                which has a fairly rigid metal backing. A more flexible back, as on
                Printight, can be more distorted by tools with a short cut (except
                maybe the nibbler, which supports the remaining material as it cuts,
                but it can leave a bit of a sawtooth edge). Cut Printight with
                tinsnips and it may get a lasagna-edge. As I said, these tools are
                useful but not perfect. And I can understand why some people prefer
                the ease of cutting plastic plates with scissors or xacto.
                But since I often mount small plates on lead high-base, the nibbler
                lets me trim a plate right up to the beard, butt it against foundry
                type, etc.
                Eric Holub, SF
                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...> wrote:
                > Yeah, I've got a zillion specialized tools for this, and dropped a few
                > more bucks tonight searching for that nibbler. Ah, Radio Shack, sort
                > of like going to Home Depot, except for the wait. Still junk when you
                > get it home though.
                >
                > I suppose this will irritate just about everyone but I'd recommend not
                > ever disturbing the length/width configuration of a plate, whether
                > steel-backed or polyester-backed. Except, of course, in the quick and
                > dirty or the desperate necessity. Why? The lay-down can easily get
                > distorted or twisted. Plain and simple.
              • Gerald Lange
                Just some information: Besides manufacturing magnetic flatbases and magnetic cylinders for the printing industry, Bunting actually makes non-magnetic cylinders
                Message 7 of 28 , Apr 7, 2007
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                  Just some information:

                  Besides manufacturing magnetic flatbases and magnetic cylinders for
                  the printing industry, Bunting actually makes non-magnetic cylinders
                  for use with polyester-backed plates—and has for a "lot" longer than
                  "boxcar plates" have been around. They never manufactured a
                  non-magnetic flatbase though, I assume, market-wise, they saw no
                  industry support since non-magnetic flatbases were readily available.
                  I had a bunch of the old plastic newspaper bases at one point, and
                  they were also made from type metal and wood (I have some very precise
                  aluminum combination base material that was manufactured in Germany).
                  Those old AWT and ATF catalogs list all sorts of base material.

                  Gerald
                  http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


                  > >
                  > > By "boxcar plate," do you mean you are using a polyester-backed plate
                  > > w/film adhesive on a Bunting Magnetic base? If so, what is the
                  > > rationale?
                  > >
                  >
                  > Yes we use polyester-backed plates w/ film adhesive (a whole lot
                  > easier to say boxcar plate), but it's not on a magnetic base, its
                  > just an aluminum base. I don't know why I said bunting.
                  >
                  > But, even on a magnetic base I would use boxcar plates (and have
                  > before, on other people's setup) and just adjust the press
                  > accordingly, for a number of reasons, though mostly for quick
                  > registration (we tape the plate upside down to the paper, properly
                  > registered, and then run it through the press).
                  >
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