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RE: [PPLetterpress] Re: best-loved faces

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  • Lance Williams
    Well, As a stationery printer for over 25 years, and the business for over 73 years, I ll chime in here a little.... I can t say what my personal favorite
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 4, 2007
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      Well,

      As a stationery printer for over 25 years, and the business for over 73
      years, I'll chime in here a little.... I can't say what my personal
      favorite faces are, it all depends on what I am working on at the time.
      However, we have always limited out stationery lines to a few specific
      faces for two reasons:

      1: Ease of selling the stationery, as we sell "door to door" through
      school groups, church groups, etc, and by having only a few type styles
      makes it easier, especially for the younger salespeople.

      2: Easier for us, as we don't have to change magazines in our Intertypes
      as we set type. We currently have one Model C with 2 mags with duplex
      faces, giving us a total of 6 usable type styles on that machine, and the
      other Model C has 5 usable type styles. We also use 3 faces on our Ludlow,
      even though we have many more for other uses.

      First Model C: 10 Pt. Helvetica w/italic, 12 Pt. Bernard Fashion w/ Park
      Ave & 12 Pt. Engravers Text w/Typo Roman.

      2nd Model C: 11 Pt. Times Roman w/ Italic, 14 Pt. Waverly w/ italic, 18 pt.
      Vogue Oblique.

      Ludlow: 18 Pt. Society Text, 18 pt. Tempo Light Italic, 24 pt. Coronet

      These are the various faces we have used on our stationery products for
      more than the past 25 years. However, I am currently in the process of
      adding several magazines of mats to offer some new faces to the line to see
      if it will help improve sales. I think our line has become somewhat
      "stale" over the years, and needs some "modernization" to infuse a little
      more life in it...

      Well, have to cut this short, as I have to make/eat breakfast and get to
      work....

      - Lance Williams
      Williams Stationery Co.
      Camden, New York
      APA #785


      > [Original Message]
      > From: Gerald Lange <Bieler@...>
      > To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: 1/4/2007 2:42:04 AM
      > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: best-loved faces
      >
      > PPL
      >
      > Actually, I was hoping some of the folks involved in the recent
      > letterpress revival, the stationery/invitational card folks, would
      > have responded to this. Truth be told though, I can't really find
      > their representation on any of the letterpress lists. Not sure what
      > that says. Insular? Competitive? Letterpress is a selling point, but
      > no real further, deeper interest?
      >
      > Gerald
      > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • lisa rappoport
      ... Hi Gerald, As someone who prints invitations, along with other commercial work and my own personal work, the answer seems clear: One s own favorite faces
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 4, 2007
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        >Actually, I was hoping some of the folks involved in the recent
        >letterpress revival, the stationery/invitational card folks, would
        >have responded to this. Truth be told though, I can't really find
        >their representation on any of the letterpress lists. Not sure what
        >that says. Insular? Competitive? Letterpress is a selling point, but
        >no real further, deeper interest?

        Hi Gerald,
        As someone who prints invitations, along with other commercial work and my own personal work, the answer seems clear: One's own favorite faces are generally irrelevant. The customer will select the face, esp. if you're going the polymer plate route, in which case they can choose from whatever digital font, suitable or not, they've ever seen.

        With handset metal type obviously they're limited to what I have, and within that to what I have enough of, in appropriate sizes, for the job at hand. So it's a pre-selected selection.

        My house font has always been Centaur. I'm also very drawn to Garamond, esp. the italic; Bernhard Gothic, esp. the light weight; and some oddities like Greeting Monotone (rarely appropriate, but wonderful in the right usage) and Glamour Light.

        And I confess to some low tastes, like Park Avenue and Typo Upright.

        Best,
        Lisa
        Littoral Press
      • Gerald Lange
        Hi Lisa Well, yes, and no. I process plates for a number of stationery/invitational card folks—some of them quite high end and prolific—and the latter will
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 4, 2007
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          Hi Lisa

          Well, yes, and no. I process plates for a number of
          stationery/invitational card folks—some of them quite high end and
          prolific—and the latter will either direct their clients
          appropriately, as designers should (I'd think), or (in regard to favs)
          they may have a line of cards developed in which they are using their
          own preferred faces.

          So, I'd suggest it is not always just what the client demands but
          often how they are directed to what they need. And, I would think, if
          they are coming to you (generic you), they are coming for a specific
          reason, your taste, your expertise, skill, what uniquely you have to
          offer, etc. Yes? No?

          Gerald
          http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, lisa rappoport <cutvelvet@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > >Actually, I was hoping some of the folks involved in the recent
          > >letterpress revival, the stationery/invitational card folks, would
          > >have responded to this. Truth be told though, I can't really find
          > >their representation on any of the letterpress lists. Not sure what
          > >that says. Insular? Competitive? Letterpress is a selling point, but
          > >no real further, deeper interest?
          >
          > Hi Gerald,
          > As someone who prints invitations, along with other commercial work
          and my own personal work, the answer seems clear: One's own favorite
          faces are generally irrelevant. The customer will select the face,
          esp. if you're going the polymer plate route, in which case they can
          choose from whatever digital font, suitable or not, they've ever seen.
          >

          >
        • juliemackenzie2003
          Hi Gerald and Lisa- I am a custom invitation designer and also print for designers as well. I agree with Gerald, I tend to steer my clients in the directions
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 5, 2007
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            Hi Gerald and Lisa-

            I am a custom invitation designer and also print for designers as
            well.

            I agree with Gerald, I tend to steer my clients in the directions of
            my tried and true typefaces. I have in my early days, tried
            different faces because it was what they liked. Often to my dismay.
            They liked the end result, but I fussed through the entire print
            process.

            When time allows, I will print for an occasional designer. Not
            always liking the design and type faces. I did one time get quite a
            surprise on a typeface that I thought was horrible. Hard to read and
            letters were not what I thought (in digital format) Yet when I
            printed it. It looked quite lovely. That was Escrita Principal.

            anyways, long story short. What the client wants is often what you
            will recommend within their design style.

            Thanks,
            Julie MacKenzie
            www.mackenziepress.com

            > Well, yes, and no. I process plates for a number of
            > stationery/invitational card folks—some of them quite high end and
            > prolific—and the latter will either direct their clients
            > appropriately, as designers should (I'd think), or (in regard to
            favs)
            > they may have a line of cards developed in which they are using
            their
            > own preferred faces.
            >
            > So, I'd suggest it is not always just what the client demands but
            > often how they are directed to what they need. And, I would think,
            if
            > they are coming to you (generic you), they are coming for a specific
            > reason, your taste, your expertise, skill, what uniquely you have to
            > offer, etc. Yes? No?
            >
            > Gerald
            > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
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