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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Linotypesetting

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  • Ed Inman
    ... It s also probably far cheaper for most graphic artists to outsource printing altogether--much less want to have anything to do (hands-on) with the arcane
    Message 1 of 22 , Dec 25, 2006
      -----Original Message-----
      >From: Gerald Lange <Bieler@...>
      >Based on your
      >production, it is far cheaper to outsource for processed photopolymer
      >plates than to buy a platemaker or even try to process them yourself by
      >alternative means.

      It's also probably far cheaper for most graphic artists to outsource printing altogether--much less want to have anything to do (hands-on) with the arcane world of letterpress...

      But what fun is that? (LOL)

      Oh sure, we can ponder initial vs. ongoing platemaking costs till the Linotype freezes over, but what digital-era graphic artist/letterpress freak in this "I want it yesterday" market would not *want* to make their own photopolymer plates?

      Who wants to wait hours, days, or even weeks on a plate to arrive in the mail from some service bureau in Timbuktu when you can make your own in 20 minutes time?

      Obviously, learning to make plates involves some investment and a different set of skills than printing, but it's nothing to be overly afraid of for skilled craftspersons. I've successfully made hundreds of them with only modest equipment and anybody with a burning desire to learn the same can do likewise.

      cheers,
      Ed
    • Gerald Lange
      Hi Ed 20 minutes!!! Even a platemaking machine can t process em anywhere near that fast. It takes much longer than that for the bath to heat up, especially in
      Message 2 of 22 , Dec 25, 2006
        Hi Ed

        20 minutes!!! Even a platemaking machine can't process em anywhere
        near that fast. It takes much longer than that for the bath to heat
        up, especially in winter.

        You must be doing something right, and having fun doing it as well.
        Congrats.

        Gerald



        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > >From: Gerald Lange <Bieler@...>
        > >Based on your
        > >production, it is far cheaper to outsource for processed photopolymer
        > >plates than to buy a platemaker or even try to process them
        yourself by
        > >alternative means.
        >
        > It's also probably far cheaper for most graphic artists to outsource
        printing altogether--much less want to have anything to do (hands-on)
        with the arcane world of letterpress...
        >
        > But what fun is that? (LOL)
        >
        > Oh sure, we can ponder initial vs. ongoing platemaking costs till
        the Linotype freezes over, but what digital-era graphic
        artist/letterpress freak in this "I want it yesterday" market would
        not *want* to make their own photopolymer plates?
        >
        > Who wants to wait hours, days, or even weeks on a plate to arrive in
        the mail from some service bureau in Timbuktu when you can make your
        own in 20 minutes time?
        >
        > Obviously, learning to make plates involves some investment and a
        different set of skills than printing, but it's nothing to be overly
        afraid of for skilled craftspersons. I've successfully made hundreds
        of them with only modest equipment and anybody with a burning desire
        to learn the same can do likewise.
        >
        > cheers,
        > Ed
        >
      • Bethany Carter
        ... Dear Ed, I have that burning desire!! Unfortunately what I don t have is the information on how to build said modest equipment , and then what to do with
        Message 3 of 22 , Dec 25, 2006
          >I've successfully made hundreds of them with only modest equipment and
          >anybody with a burning desire to learn the same can do likewise.

          Dear Ed,

          I have that burning desire!! Unfortunately what I don't have is the
          information on how to build said "modest equipment", and then what to do
          with it when it's built. I've always had my plates made by Boxcar and they
          always do a lovely job, but I would love to learn how to make them myself.
          There are many things I would like to print but the cost of having a plate
          made is usually why they don't get printed. Would you be willing to share
          your knowledge of the process with me and how to build the equipment? You
          can certainly contact me off list with your reply if you prefer. Thanks for
          your consideration!! Have a happy holiday!

          Bethany


          >From: Ed Inman <edinman@...>
          >Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Linotypesetting
          >Date: Mon, 25 Dec 2006 02:55:30 -0600 (GMT-06:00)
          >
          >
          >
          >-----Original Message-----
          > >From: Gerald Lange <Bieler@...>
          > >Based on your
          > >production, it is far cheaper to outsource for processed photopolymer
          > >plates than to buy a platemaker or even try to process them yourself by
          > >alternative means.
          >
          >It's also probably far cheaper for most graphic artists to outsource
          >printing altogether--much less want to have anything to do (hands-on) with
          >the arcane world of letterpress...
          >
          >But what fun is that? (LOL)
          >
          >Oh sure, we can ponder initial vs. ongoing platemaking costs till the
          >Linotype freezes over, but what digital-era graphic artist/letterpress
          >freak in this "I want it yesterday" market would not *want* to make their
          >own photopolymer plates?
          >
          >Who wants to wait hours, days, or even weeks on a plate to arrive in the
          >mail from some service bureau in Timbuktu when you can make your own in 20
          >minutes time?
          >
          >Obviously, learning to make plates involves some investment and a different
          >set of skills than printing, but it's nothing to be overly afraid of for
          >skilled craftspersons. I've successfully made hundreds of them with only
          >modest equipment and anybody with a burning desire to learn the same can do
          >likewise.
          >
          >cheers,
          >Ed

          _________________________________________________________________
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        • bellky6030
          I have also made quite a few PPplates with modest equipment. I make .250 soft polymer plates for a flexo-ish operation and I also make hard resin plates for
          Message 4 of 22 , Dec 25, 2006
            I have also made quite a few PPplates with modest equipment. I
            make .250 soft polymer plates for a flexo-ish operation and I also make
            hard resin plates for debossing type and images into soft paper. Each
            plate takes less than thirty minutes, start to finish.

            I'm using liquid resin, ink jet transparencies, hardware-store 'black
            lights', and some old toothbrushes and nail brushes for processing. I
            wouldn't necessarily recommend doing fine work this way, but for line
            art and 12pt and larger type it's working quite well. As I gain more
            experience and further refine my techniques I expect to move to finer
            images and smaller type.

            Anyway, it can be done with simple, homemade equipment, and with good
            results.

            Regards,
            Dave
          • Scott Young
            Does anyone one the list have a good source that explains how to get started using photopolymer plates or a source to get a sample plate made to try on
            Message 5 of 22 , Dec 26, 2006
              Does anyone one the list have a good source that explains 'how' to get
              started using photopolymer plates or a source to get a sample plate made to
              try on press?
              Thanks in advance!
              Scott


              -------Original Message-------

              From: bellky6030
              Date: 12/25/2006 10:32:57 PM
              To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [PPLetterpress] PP Plates in 20

              I have also made quite a few PPplates with modest equipment. I
              make .250 soft polymer plates for a flexo-ish operation and I also make
              hard resin plates for debossing type and images into soft paper. Each
              plate takes less than thirty minutes, start to finish.

              I'm using liquid resin, ink jet transparencies, hardware-store 'black
              lights', and some old toothbrushes and nail brushes for processing. I
              wouldn't necessarily recommend doing fine work this way, but for line
              art and 12pt and larger type it's working quite well. As I gain more
              experience and further refine my techniques I expect to move to finer
              images and smaller type.

              Anyway, it can be done with simple, homemade equipment, and with good
              results.

              Regards,
              Dave





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Gerald Lange
              Scott Can t help you with the plate sample thing as you actually need a height specific base to print plates but I did write a monograph on photopolymer plates
              Message 6 of 22 , Dec 26, 2006
                Scott

                Can't help you with the plate sample thing as you actually need a
                height specific base to print plates but I did write a monograph on
                photopolymer plates a while back.

                Go here
                http://bielerpressxi.blogspot.com/

                Gerald

                ps: by the way, your email address is junked. You might want to fix that.





                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Scott Young" <scott@...> wrote:
                >
                > Does anyone one the list have a good source that explains 'how' to get
                > started using photopolymer plates or a source to get a sample plate
                made to
                > try on press?
                > Thanks in advance!
                > Scott
                >
              • jason@greenboathouse.com
                Like Bethany, I have the desire and a decent sense of discovery, and the discussion here of custom plate-making has me both curious and eager. I know many on
                Message 7 of 22 , Dec 27, 2006
                  Like Bethany, I have the desire and a decent sense of discovery, and the discussion here of custom plate-making has me both curious and eager. I know many on the list hold fairly tight their trade secrets, thinking them well earned and thus somewhat private skills, but should anyone feel generous enough to share the basic construction & directions, I, too, would be very grateful so that I can venture into what I'm sure is a frustrating & rewarding process of trial and error.

                  Tom, or others, on-list or off, I'd greatly appreciate the same information Bethany has requested.

                  All the best to everyone for the new year...

                  Jason

                  _____________________________

                  Jason Dewinetz
                  www.greenboathouse.com/dewinetz



                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Bethany Carter
                  To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, December 25, 2006 8:00 PM
                  Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Linotypesetting


                  >I've successfully made hundreds of them with only modest equipment and
                  >anybody with a burning desire to learn the same can do likewise.

                  Dear Ed,

                  I have that burning desire!! Unfortunately what I don't have is the
                  information on how to build said "modest equipment", and then what to do
                  with it when it's built. I've always had my plates made by Boxcar and they
                  always do a lovely job, but I would love to learn how to make them myself.
                  There are many things I would like to print but the cost of having a plate
                  made is usually why they don't get printed. Would you be willing to share
                  your knowledge of the process with me and how to build the equipment? You
                  can certainly contact me off list with your reply if you prefer. Thanks for
                  your consideration!! Have a happy holiday!

                  Bethany

                  >From: Ed Inman <edinman@...>
                  >Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                  >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Linotypesetting
                  >Date: Mon, 25 Dec 2006 02:55:30 -0600 (GMT-06:00)
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >-----Original Message-----
                  > >From: Gerald Lange <Bieler@...>
                  > >Based on your
                  > >production, it is far cheaper to outsource for processed photopolymer
                  > >plates than to buy a platemaker or even try to process them yourself by
                  > >alternative means.
                  >
                  >It's also probably far cheaper for most graphic artists to outsource
                  >printing altogether--much less want to have anything to do (hands-on) with
                  >the arcane world of letterpress...
                  >
                  >But what fun is that? (LOL)
                  >
                  >Oh sure, we can ponder initial vs. ongoing platemaking costs till the
                  >Linotype freezes over, but what digital-era graphic artist/letterpress
                  >freak in this "I want it yesterday" market would not *want* to make their
                  >own photopolymer plates?
                  >
                  >Who wants to wait hours, days, or even weeks on a plate to arrive in the
                  >mail from some service bureau in Timbuktu when you can make your own in 20
                  >minutes time?
                  >
                  >Obviously, learning to make plates involves some investment and a different
                  >set of skills than printing, but it's nothing to be overly afraid of for
                  >skilled craftspersons. I've successfully made hundreds of them with only
                  >modest equipment and anybody with a burning desire to learn the same can do
                  >likewise.
                  >
                  >cheers,
                  >Ed

                  __________________________________________________________
                  Get live scores and news about your team: Add the Live.com Football Page
                  www.live.com/?addtemplate=football&icid=T001MSN30A0701





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Gerald Lange
                  Jason and Bethany In the Files section here is Brian Allen s article A Homemade Photopolymer Plate Making System. You might find this helpful.
                  Message 8 of 22 , Dec 27, 2006
                    Jason and Bethany

                    In the Files section here is Brian Allen's article "A Homemade
                    Photopolymer Plate Making System." You might find this helpful.

                    Files>Reference materials>BAllen Photopolymer2.pdf

                    Gerald
                    http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



                    > Like Bethany, I have the desire and a decent sense of discovery, and
                    the discussion here of custom plate-making has me both curious and
                    eager. I know many on the list hold fairly tight their trade secrets,
                    thinking them well earned and thus somewhat private skills, but should
                    anyone feel generous enough to share the basic construction &
                    directions, I, too, would be very grateful so that I can venture into
                    what I'm sure is a frustrating & rewarding process of trial and error.
                    >
                    > Tom, or others, on-list or off, I'd greatly appreciate the same
                    information Bethany has requested.
                    >
                    > All the best to everyone for the new year...
                    >
                    > Jason
                    >
                    > _____________________________
                    >
                    > Jason Dewinetz
                    > www.greenboathouse.com/dewinetz
                    >
                    >
                  • Kayle Simon
                    Gerald, I am familiar with the article you wrote on revising fonts for letterpress, and also familiar with the foundries you mention. I have always loved type
                    Message 9 of 22 , Dec 28, 2006
                      Gerald,

                      I am familiar with the article you wrote on revising fonts for
                      letterpress,
                      and also familiar with the foundries you mention. I have always loved
                      type and have many of my own favorites, of course; those that are always
                      "on" and at the ready, those I find myself turning to time and again.

                      I would say that there are perhaps only 30 or so of the thousands of
                      fonts I own, that I literally could not live without.

                      What I would like to know is, not what fonts are best for
                      letterpress, but
                      what fonts do you, Gerald Lange, turn to, time and time again,
                      with the understanding that some if not most of these, you have revised
                      for letterpress printing?

                      And what fonts do others on this list similiarly find themselves
                      turning to?
                      It's a personal question, rather than a technical one; I'm not asking
                      anyone to
                      tell me what to love; I'm asking what others love.

                      Thank you again, everyone, and Happy New Year!

                      Kayle Simon


                      On Dec 24, 2006, at 3:07 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

                      > It is hard to make specific
                      > recommendations as everyone is going to have their own taste about
                      > typefaces
                      >
                      > ..


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Gerald Lange
                      Kayle While I do use certain typefaces over and over again for non-letterpress related work I rarely do so for letterpress. Mainly my work is book related, and
                      Message 10 of 22 , Dec 28, 2006
                        Kayle

                        While I do use certain typefaces over and over again for
                        non-letterpress related work I rarely do so for letterpress. Mainly my
                        work is book related, and it takes a good long time to produce
                        letterpress printed books. So much so that by the time I am finished
                        with a book, I'm also kind of finished with my interest in the
                        typeface. Plus, every book project is going to encourage the use of
                        the most appropriate typeface, and this is going to be determined by
                        parameters such as paper, dimension, subject matter, etc, rather than
                        "love." Plus I tend not to repeat the use of a typeface as I try to
                        avoid a standardized approach in my bookwork.

                        That said, I am currently exploring Linotype's Sabon Next, have
                        completed the typesetting of a book with Linotype's Optima (which
                        required extensive reworking), have used dfTYPE's Rialto (highly
                        recommended), Carter & Cone's Miller/Wilson Greek, most of the Adobe
                        Originals line (possibly forthcoming is a project with Kepler),
                        Monotype Imaging's Granjon, Pastonchi, Poliphilus, Berthold's Post
                        Antiqua, some of Lanston Typography's faces... I went through a period
                        where I was quite interested in faux letterpress typefaces:
                        LetterPerfect's Old Claude, MetaDesign's Celestia Antique, Hoefler &
                        Frere-Jones' St Augustin, Letraset's Papyrus, Panache Typography's
                        Lettres Eclatees. Thankfully I have gotten over that.

                        The only face I have ever had a problem with was Emigre's Journal,
                        which I actually like a great deal. It has very little affinity to the
                        letterpress process. On the other hand, while I haven't used it, I
                        have seen some impressive work with their Mrs Eaves.

                        I recently reworked Comic Sans into a very thinned out (looks far
                        better that way) PS1 version for a non-letterpress related project
                        that I am tempted to try letterpress if and when the opportunity
                        presents itself!!!

                        I've not listed any display or special purpose faces (such as script
                        or fraktur) as the original post had to do with work-a-day text faces
                        as I recall, but these are, of course, the enjoyable make-it-sing
                        touches to all typography.

                        So, I'm afraid no love list to offer you.

                        Gerald



                        >
                        > Gerald,
                        >
                        > I am familiar with the article you wrote on revising fonts for
                        > letterpress,
                        > and also familiar with the foundries you mention. I have always loved
                        > type and have many of my own favorites, of course; those that are always
                        > "on" and at the ready, those I find myself turning to time and again.
                        >
                        > I would say that there are perhaps only 30 or so of the thousands of
                        > fonts I own, that I literally could not live without.
                        >
                        > What I would like to know is, not what fonts are best for
                        > letterpress, but
                        > what fonts do you, Gerald Lange, turn to, time and time again,
                        > with the understanding that some if not most of these, you have revised
                        > for letterpress printing?
                        >
                        > And what fonts do others on this list similiarly find themselves
                        > turning to?
                        > It's a personal question, rather than a technical one; I'm not asking
                        > anyone to
                        > tell me what to love; I'm asking what others love.
                        >
                        > Thank you again, everyone, and Happy New Year!
                        >
                        > Kayle Simon
                        >
                        >
                        > On Dec 24, 2006, at 3:07 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                        >
                        > > It is hard to make specific
                        > > recommendations as everyone is going to have their own taste about
                        > > typefaces
                        > >
                        > > ..
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • John G. Henry
                        Kayle: I have always gravitated back to a Garamond-like face. Through the years I have used ATF Garamond, Garamont, and Granjon (all G faces you ll notice).
                        Message 11 of 22 , Dec 29, 2006
                          Kayle:

                          I have always gravitated back to a Garamond-like face. Through the
                          years I have used ATF Garamond, Garamont, and Granjon (all "G" faces
                          you'll notice).

                          I like the fairly small x-height which keeps the page relatively
                          light and open. In doing miniature pages, however, I think a face
                          with larger x-height becomes more readable in small sizes, so have
                          used Linotype Baskerville and Authors Roman (BB&S) to good advantage.

                          I may have related this on-line before, but it bears repeating. I
                          complained to one of my professors, Harry Duncan, that I only had
                          12pt. Garamond in sufficient quantities to set book pages. His reply
                          was that he could be happy with just that face and size for almost
                          all he wanted to do.

                          I do find myself gravitating to what I like and enjoy seeing, and
                          the older I get, the less I seek out new type and decorative
                          material.

                          John G. Henry
                          Cedar Creek Press


                          > And what fonts do others on this list similiarly find themselves
                          > turning to?
                          > It's a personal question, rather than a technical one; I'm not
                          asking
                          > anyone to
                          > tell me what to love; I'm asking what others love.
                          >
                          > Thank you again, everyone, and Happy New Year!
                          >
                          > Kayle Simon
                          >
                          >
                        • Bill Denham
                          John, Best to you in the new year. I have a memory of your response when I joined this list a while back. I hold that still. l noted your affinity for
                          Message 12 of 22 , Dec 29, 2006
                            John,

                            Best to you in the new year.

                            I have a memory of your response when I joined this list a while back. I hold that still.

                            l noted your affinity for Garamond.

                            I have the same love of how it looks.

                            I am no knower of typefaces, though once years ago when I worked for a small regional newspaper, the managing editor subscribed to "Upper and Lower Case" (I think that was the name) and I used to love spending time with it. I cannot offer any rational explanation or even wild guess for why I share your love of Garamond and Garamond-like type faces--but that's what I like and that's what I use in all my poetry.

                            Thake care.

                            Bill Denham

                            "John G. Henry" <JohnH@...> wrote: Kayle:

                            I have always gravitated back to a Garamond-like face. Through the
                            years I have used ATF Garamond, Garamont, and Granjon (all "G" faces
                            you'll notice).

                            I like the fairly small x-height which keeps the page relatively
                            light and open. In doing miniature pages, however, I think a face
                            with larger x-height becomes more readable in small sizes, so have
                            used Linotype Baskerville and Authors Roman (BB&S) to good advantage.

                            I may have related this on-line before, but it bears repeating. I
                            complained to one of my professors, Harry Duncan, that I only had
                            12pt. Garamond in sufficient quantities to set book pages. His reply
                            was that he could be happy with just that face and size for almost
                            all he wanted to do.

                            I do find myself gravitating to what I like and enjoy seeing, and
                            the older I get, the less I seek out new type and decorative
                            material.

                            John G. Henry
                            Cedar Creek Press

                            > And what fonts do others on this list similiarly find themselves
                            > turning to?
                            > It's a personal question, rather than a technical one; I'm not
                            asking
                            > anyone to
                            > tell me what to love; I'm asking what others love.
                            >
                            > Thank you again, everyone, and Happy New Year!
                            >
                            > Kayle Simon
                            >
                            >






                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Gerald Lange
                            John I ve used these all in my metal type years, and I d agree you can always trust a good Garamond. But I think the thread was about digital type. In that
                            Message 13 of 22 , Dec 30, 2006
                              John

                              I've used these all in my "metal type years," and I'd agree you can
                              always trust a good Garamond. But I think the thread was about digital
                              type. In that case, I don't know of anyone who is offering or owns the
                              rights to the ATF Garamond, but Monotype Imaging has the Granjon
                              (which I've used and thought quite good, though in modified version)
                              and P22 is offering Goudy's Garamont (as part of the Lanston
                              Typography collection). Which I have been tempted to buy. Always liked
                              its funk. But Garamond doesn't always start with a "g." Sabon, as a
                              for instance. And, I really like the Old Claude that LetterPerfect put
                              out; despite that it is faux letterpress, the settings are quite good.

                              Besides, there is a bit of a controversy over what is a Garamond,
                              isn't there? or more to the point, are all the Garamond faces
                              appropriately attributed?

                              As an aside, once upon a time, I met with Nicolas Barker, as an
                              interview for a project, and he promptly started out with the idea
                              that the first digital type program, Karow's (?), was actually an
                              attempt to have the computer determine the Garamondness of Garamond.
                              Apparently not all that successful.

                              Gerald
                              http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


                              > Kayle:
                              >
                              > I have always gravitated back to a Garamond-like face. Through the
                              > years I have used ATF Garamond, Garamont, and Granjon (all "G" faces
                              > you'll notice).
                              >
                              > I like the fairly small x-height which keeps the page relatively
                              > light and open. In doing miniature pages, however, I think a face
                              > with larger x-height becomes more readable in small sizes, so have
                              > used Linotype Baskerville and Authors Roman (BB&S) to good advantage.
                              >
                              > I may have related this on-line before, but it bears repeating. I
                              > complained to one of my professors, Harry Duncan, that I only had
                              > 12pt. Garamond in sufficient quantities to set book pages. His reply
                              > was that he could be happy with just that face and size for almost
                              > all he wanted to do.
                              >
                              > I do find myself gravitating to what I like and enjoy seeing, and
                              > the older I get, the less I seek out new type and decorative
                              > material.
                              >
                              > John G. Henry
                              > Cedar Creek Press
                              >
                              >
                              > > And what fonts do others on this list similiarly find themselves
                              > > turning to?
                              > > It's a personal question, rather than a technical one; I'm not
                              > asking
                              > > anyone to
                              > > tell me what to love; I'm asking what others love.
                              > >
                              > > Thank you again, everyone, and Happy New Year!
                              > >
                              > > Kayle Simon
                              > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • Crispin Elsted
                              Dear Kayle, I m not sure whether you mean typefaces in general, or only digital ones, but I thought I might as well weigh in with my loves . As it happens,
                              Message 14 of 22 , Dec 31, 2006
                                Dear Kayle,

                                I'm not sure whether you mean typefaces in general, or only digital ones, but I thought I might as well weigh in with my 'loves'. As it happens, mine are all metal, because that is all I use -- not from any Luddite dismissal, but simply because I have neither the software nor the expertise as yet to use digital faces. I rather imagine, as I'm now 60, that I'll be able to continue with metal predominantly for the rest of my career and still be able to leave a well-stocked collection of metal type in good condition for someone who cares to use after we've closed up shop. That said, I do plan to acquire Adobe InDesign at some point, and a few digital fonts to use on it -- although with a few exceptions, such as Rialto, most of the digital fonts I would use would be the well-digitized forms of types I use in metal.

                                Returning to metal founts (I make a habit of distinguishing between metal 'founts' and digital 'fonts', by the way) we began with Bembo and still use it: we have it from 8pt to 72pt. The other text faces we use frequently are Poliphilus and Blado, Joanna, and Van Dijck. That gives us two old styles, one transitional, and a modern -- or, in Robert Bringhurst's rather more explicit designations, two Renaissance types, one Baroque, and one modern -- which means that we can print with some sense of period and idiom most of the texts we're interested in working with. We have a number of other text faces in addition to those which we also use: Garamont, Spectrum, Caslon, Gill Sans, and Goudy Catalogue. I have always admired and often used van Krimpen's types; we have large holdings of all three sizes of Cancelleresca Bastarda, for instance, and I use that on occasion for the right piece; recently we used it for a broadsheet of a Ronsard sonnet, and some years ago we printed an edition of Spenser's 'Prothalamion' and 'Epithalamion' in Cancelleresca Bastarda. I wish I had Romanee, but can't find it any longer in metal, and although there are rumours of a digitized for of it, I haven't (yet) found it; if I do, I'll buy it whether or not I've yet acquired a digital system! My greatest 'want' on my wish list would be a very large fount of van Krimpen's Antigone Greek.

                                As to 'loving' faces, I would say that of Poliphilus & Blado and Joanna among text faces, and of Open Kapitalen (Roman and Greek) and Castellar among titling faces. And to those I would add a sublime little 16pt titling called Elysian, once cast by the Dale Guild, and unidentified as to its designer; Theo Rehak thought it might have been a forgotten Goudy face, but no one knows.

                                Thank you for letting me air a few of my enthusiasms, Kayle.

                                A happy and productive New Year to all, with attendant blessings,

                                Crispin Elsted

                                Barbarian Press
                                12375 Ainsworth Road, R.R.8
                                Mission, British Columbia V4S 1L4
                                Canada

                                Tel: 604.826.8089 Fax: 604.826.8092
                                Website: www.barbarianpress.com

                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: Kayle Simon
                                To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2006 9:02 AM
                                Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Linotypesetting


                                Gerald,

                                I am familiar with the article you wrote on revising fonts for
                                letterpress,
                                and also familiar with the foundries you mention. I have always loved
                                type and have many of my own favorites, of course; those that are always
                                "on" and at the ready, those I find myself turning to time and again.

                                I would say that there are perhaps only 30 or so of the thousands of
                                fonts I own, that I literally could not live without.

                                What I would like to know is, not what fonts are best for
                                letterpress, but
                                what fonts do you, Gerald Lange, turn to, time and time again,
                                with the understanding that some if not most of these, you have revised
                                for letterpress printing?

                                And what fonts do others on this list similiarly find themselves
                                turning to?
                                It's a personal question, rather than a technical one; I'm not asking
                                anyone to
                                tell me what to love; I'm asking what others love.

                                Thank you again, everyone, and Happy New Year!

                                Kayle Simon

                                On Dec 24, 2006, at 3:07 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

                                > It is hard to make specific
                                > recommendations as everyone is going to have their own taste about
                                > typefaces
                                >
                                > ..

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Kayle Simon
                                Thank you so much, Crispin, Gerald, John and Bill, for your comments on fonts (and founts). I do hope to collect metal type as the years go on (I own extremely
                                Message 15 of 22 , Dec 31, 2006
                                  Thank you so much, Crispin, Gerald, John and Bill, for your comments
                                  on fonts (and founts).
                                  I do hope to collect metal type as the years go on (I own extremely
                                  little now, not having
                                  come into a collection with either of my presses); now I have a list
                                  of what
                                  I might want to look for in particular, along with some new fonts
                                  that have been mentioned
                                  that I must consider for possible digital use.

                                  And thank you, Lance, for scanning and posting the calendars.

                                  Happy New Year everyone.

                                  Kayle Simon
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