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Re: Rust | Very Scared

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  • Jim Shockey
    Josh, I would be hesitant to use WD-40 for anything but very short-term protection. And, don t put it anywhere that won t be wiped and re-coated regularly,
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 16, 2006
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      Josh,



      I would be hesitant to use WD-40 for anything but very

      short-term protection. And, don't put it anywhere that won't

      be wiped and re-coated regularly, such as: on shafts, linkages,

      ways, bearing surfaces, etc. It tends to polymerize if left for

      extended periods, becoming gummy and difficult to remove,.

      I once created a real mess for myself by using WD-40 on

      a transit (surveying instrument). After it sat for a few months,

      it took me several days to clean the stuff up. Now, if you have

      moisture somewhere you don't want it - use the WD-40, WD

      stands for Water Displacement. Then, lubricate with the proper

      oil.



      The light machine oil solution is your best bet for short-term

      protection - perhaps up to a couple of weeks.



      For severe conditions, I would look to the firearms aficionados.

      They are very serious about keeping metal from rusting. One

      of their favorite products for short-term protection is "BreakFree

      CLP." For long-term and storage situations, many tend to favor

      "Birchwood Casey Sheath."



      Having spent many years in machine shops, I feel that oil and

      lots of it (within reason) is your best friend. I always keep an

      oily rag around for wiping machine beds and ways.



      BUT REMEMBER: Guard against spontaneous combustion as

      if your life depends on it.





      Good luck,



      Jim





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