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Re: [PPLetterpress] RE:plate travel

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  • Gerald Lange
    ... Brian and Harold Some final statements for my part, there is only so much one can say about this without endlessly repeating the same stuff over and over:
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 5 7:26 AM
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      Brian Molanphy wrote:
      >
      > sorry to trim yer message. i thought pin registration referred to paper not
      > plate, and i dunno what a kerf is. harold refers to 'blanks' to hold the
      > printing plate in place. i guess this means a polymer plate with no printing
      > image. and i guess a butt bar is a piece of furniture higher than the base
      > but shorter than type high, which abutts both the base and the edge of the
      > plate? to use this a printer must line up the plate edge with base edge?
      >
      > the plate travel on the bunting base occurs like harold says: big solids with
      > heavy impression move the plate away from the feedboard. worse than solids
      > are half-tones, in my limited experience.
      >

      Brian and Harold

      Some final statements for my part, there is only so much one can say about
      this without endlessly repeating the same stuff over and over:

      I use blanks (cut pieces of plate material) to facilitate registration. If a
      plate is off by a measure in one corner, I move the one blank that measure and
      pick up the plate and slide it in position. I think the blanks prevent drift
      as well (as I keep them in position), and may be why I have not experienced
      plate travel (?). On a Bunting I use a padding knife or rounded bookbinders
      knife and slide that a bit under the plate until it releases, using the broad
      edge of the knife as lift, so I don't experience bent plates either. If you
      just lift one corner and pull back diagonally you will experience bending with
      any steel backed plate on any magnetic base. I have found you do not have to
      release a steel backed completely to make the adjustment, one edge can remain
      in contact with the base and the plate is just slid into position. Because of
      this, I don't experience the bent plate problem. I have found this to be more
      of a characteristic when you do use adhesives as you are then countering the
      natural lift of the plate. (Truth be told, I diagonally removed the plastic
      backed plate from the Boxcar base and the adhesive stretched and bunched up
      and was unusable. Sorry, Harold!!!)

      A kerf is simply an incision or line cut across the surface of the base. These
      are quite common in bases used for straight-line scoring and the like (the
      cutting blade is inserted into them). They can prevent travel because the
      surface disturbance provides friction. You would not want these direct under
      printable image though. Yes, Brian, you are correct on the purpose of a butt
      bar. I've only used these on a Patmag, not on a Bunting. And yes, pin
      registration is a low profile registration pin plugged into the base. I could
      be remembering wrong but I thought that Bradley Hutchinson once told me he
      used these on Patmags as well. Bradley?

      Gerald
    • Joel Benson
      All concerned, I love the handiness of the Bunting base- plates are quickly and accurately repositionable, and in very small increments, which really speeds
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 5 2:12 PM
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        All concerned,

        I love the handiness of the Bunting base- plates are quickly and accurately repositionable, and in very small increments, which really speeds the set-up time. To my mind, therin lies the "economy" of the Buntings. But that plate-creep can be a real bugaboo, esp. if you need very accurate register. Spray adhesive, tape on the edge of the plate, butted up pieces of blank plate material- all those remedies have failed me when the plate has decided it must creep. I never tried a butt bar or the pin system, but those sound pretty workable in the right situation.

        I like the solidity of the metal-backed plates over the floppiness of the plastic backed, though I admit that the plastic ones are a lot easier to work with. Easier to cut, no sharp edges, see-through quality is nice.

        I am most impressed, however, with that adhesive that Harold sells to attach plates to the Boxcar Base, and the next time I have a creep problem I am going to stick some of that onto my metal backed plate and I bet my problem goes away!

        Joel

        Joel Benson
        Dependable Letterpress
        San Francisco

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Brian Molanphy [mailto:bmolanphy@...]
        Sent: Friday, July 05, 2002 1:41 PM
        To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [PPLetterpress] RE:plate travel



        gerald,

        sorry to trim yer message. i thought pin registration referred to paper not
        plate, and i dunno what a kerf is. harold refers to 'blanks' to hold the
        printing plate in place. i guess this means a polymer plate with no printing
        image. and i guess a butt bar is a piece of furniture higher than the base
        but shorter than type high, which abutts both the base and the edge of the
        plate? to use this a printer must line up the plate edge with base edge?

        the plate travel on the bunting base occurs like harold says: big solids with
        heavy impression move the plate away from the feedboard. worse than solids
        are half-tones, in my limited experience.

        brian
      • bielerpr
        Haven t done a large solid in years, but used to use photoengraved plates on a honeycomb base to do so (I still do if I m working with a four color job).
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 5 6:34 PM
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          Haven't done a large solid in years, but used to use photoengraved
          plates on a honeycomb base to do so (I still do if I'm working with a
          four color job). These always seemed to work out well registration-
          wise but getting adequate ink coverage was the problem unless I opted
          for copper—usually only did this when I needed to capture detail).
          Photopolymer is a much more receptive printing surface but if there
          is a tendency for the plate to travel, as the concensus here seems to
          indicate, probably safer to stick with the honeycomb base and deal
          with the inking problem?

          Gerald


          "Joel Benson" <joel.benson@p...> wrote:
          But that plate-creep can be a real bugaboo, esp. if you need very
          accurate register. Spray adhesive, tape on the edge of the plate,
          butted up pieces of blank plate material- all those remedies have
          failed me when the plate has decided it must creep.
          >

          >
          > the plate travel on the bunting base occurs like harold says: big solids =
          with
          > heavy impression move the plate away from the feedboard. worse than solid=
          s
          > are half-tones, in my limited experience.
          >
          > brian
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