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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: loose ink

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  • alex brooks
    Recently i ve switched from van son rubber base (which i was taught with and have used by default) to litho inks. I love them. Perfect for auto inking on the
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 2, 2006
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      Recently i've switched from van son rubber base (which i was taught
      with and have used by default) to litho inks. I love them. Perfect
      for auto inking on the vandercook, especially for woodcuts /
      woodengravings. I just did a set of editions for a local artist -
      woodcuts and engravings, and he wanted me to use some litho ink with
      charbonnel mixed in- amazing for fine lines with no ink squeeze. $30/
      lb but the end result is worth it.

      I'd try some cheap daniel smith litho ink first. also don't try this
      for hand inking or on a platen press.
      -alex
      press eight seventeen
      lexington kentucky
      >
      >
      > >
      > > Thanks everyone! I just got new rollers for my press and raised them
      > > quite a bit but am still getting a little ink squeeze on my
      > prints and
      > > I thought I would try to stiffen the ink some and maybe that would
      > > help. I use Van Son oil based inks, and while we're on the
      > subject, is
      > > there a recommended amount of how much Mag. Carbonate to add to the
      > > ink? Or is it basically just trial and error until you get it right?
      > > Should the ink then be really stiff or should it still be pretty
      > > workable on the slab? Thanks for all the advice!!
      > >
      > > Bethany Carter Kneff
      > > ThistleBerry Press
      > >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • parallel_imp
      ... [ . . . ] ... It d help to be more precise in describing inks, since litho ink describes most ink that is made. All the Van Son inks (oil, rubber,
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 3, 2006
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        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, alex brooks <alex@...> wrote:
        >
        > Recently i've switched from van son rubber base (which i was taught
        > with and have used by default) to litho inks.
        [ . . . ]
        > I'd try some cheap daniel smith litho ink first. also don't try this
        > for hand inking or on a platen press.

        It'd help to be more precise in describing inks, since "litho ink"
        describes most ink that is made. All the Van Son inks (oil, rubber,
        acrylic) are litho inks, intended for use on rotary offset
        lithographic presses, but also suitable for letterpress work.
        By "litho ink" do you mean ink intended for lithographic
        printmaking, formulated for hand-rolling of litho stone or metal
        plate? The Dan Smith litho inks would fall into that category.
      • alex brooks
        ... sorry- yes I meant printmaking ink for plate and stone lithography, not offset ink. In printmaking catalogs like Graphic Chemical they are know as litho
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 3, 2006
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          >>
          >> It'd help to be more precise in describing inks, since "litho ink"
          >> describes most ink that is made. All the Van Son inks (oil, rubber,
          >> acrylic) are litho inks, intended for use on rotary offset
          >> lithographic presses, but also suitable for letterpress work.
          >> By "litho ink" do you mean ink intended for lithographic
          >> printmaking, formulated for hand-rolling of litho stone or metal
          >> plate? The Dan Smith litho inks would fall into that category.
          sorry- yes I meant printmaking ink for plate and stone lithography,
          not offset ink. In printmaking catalogs like Graphic Chemical they
          are know as litho inks as opposed to relief printing or etching inks.
          They are very stiff unlike Van Son which, depending upon the color,
          can be almost soupy.
          -alex
        • Gerald Lange
          Alex If you ever come across any of the Sinclair-Valentine Stone inks, buy em. The colors are great, especially the reds; never found a black. As I recall,
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 8, 2006
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            Alex

            If you ever come across any of the Sinclair-Valentine "Stone" inks,
            buy em. The colors are great, especially the reds; never found a
            black. As I recall, crapola Flint Ink bought them out and with typical
            corporate efficiency wiped them off the face of the earth, formulas
            and all.

            Gerald
            http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, alex brooks <alex@...> wrote:
            >
            > >>
            > >> It'd help to be more precise in describing inks, since "litho ink"
            > >> describes most ink that is made. All the Van Son inks (oil, rubber,
            > >> acrylic) are litho inks, intended for use on rotary offset
            > >> lithographic presses, but also suitable for letterpress work.
            > >> By "litho ink" do you mean ink intended for lithographic
            > >> printmaking, formulated for hand-rolling of litho stone or metal
            > >> plate? The Dan Smith litho inks would fall into that category.
            > sorry- yes I meant printmaking ink for plate and stone lithography,
            > not offset ink. In printmaking catalogs like Graphic Chemical they
            > are know as litho inks as opposed to relief printing or etching inks.
            > They are very stiff unlike Van Son which, depending upon the color,
            > can be almost soupy.
            > -alex
            >
          • Chad Pastotnik
            All (or almost all) our holiday printing is done this year, here is some of the stuff: The 2007 calendars are done and make great gifts. Printed in four colors
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 13, 2006
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              All (or almost all) our holiday printing is done this year, here is
              some of the stuff:

              The 2007 calendars are done and make great gifts. Printed in four
              colors on Frankfurt paper and includes moon phases, 5 3/4 x 5 1/4
              inches.
              http://deepwoodpress.com/calendar.html

              Christmas cards: 19 different designs and a coaster for Santa.
              http://deepwoodpress.com/holcards.html

              New Art Nouveau dragonfly journals/blank books
              http://deepwoodpress.com/journals.html

              Chad

              _____________________________

              Chad Pastotnik
              Deep Wood Press 231.587.0506
              http://www.deepwoodpress.com
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