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Re: [PPLetterpress] loose ink

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  • Mike Jacobs
    Really ???????????? How about Magnesia !!!!!!!!!!!!! That translates as Magnesium Carbonate Levi Mike Willshire Jacobs at the Cockleshell Press, England
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 1, 1998
      Really ????????????

      How about Magnesia !!!!!!!!!!!!!

      That translates as Magnesium Carbonate Levi



      Mike Willshire Jacobs at the Cockleshell Press, England

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jessica Spring
      magnesium
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
        magnesium

        > From: "thistleberry_press" <etsu4@...>
        > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Thu, 02 Nov 2006 01:15:08 -0000
        > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [PPLetterpress] loose ink
        >
        >
        > Hi,
        >
        > I apologize in advance for this question because I'm positive that it
        > has been discussed here before but I've been fighting with my press all
        > day and it won (the rematch is tomorrow) and I'm just tired and not
        > thinking straight. What substance can be used to stiffen up loose ink?
        > I know of corn starch but I also know there is something else and I just
        > can't remember what it is. Again, I apologize but any answer would be
        > greatly appreciated.
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Bethany Carter Kneff
        >
        > ThistleBerry Press
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • thistleberry_press
        Hi, I apologize in advance for this question because I m positive that it has been discussed here before but I ve been fighting with my press all day and it
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
          Hi,

          I apologize in advance for this question because I'm positive that it
          has been discussed here before but I've been fighting with my press all
          day and it won (the rematch is tomorrow) and I'm just tired and not
          thinking straight. What substance can be used to stiffen up loose ink?
          I know of corn starch but I also know there is something else and I just
          can't remember what it is. Again, I apologize but any answer would be
          greatly appreciated.

          Thanks,

          Bethany Carter Kneff

          ThistleBerry Press
        • Charles D. Jones
          Hello Bethany, Calcium Carbonate and Magnesium Carbonate are often used. They are available at some drug stores but are common supplies available from Graphic
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
            Hello Bethany,
            Calcium Carbonate and Magnesium Carbonate are often used. They are
            available at some drug stores but are common supplies available from Graphic
            Chemical & Ink or Daniel Smith. You may also use a stiffer ink. What is
            your ink problem. Perhaps it would be easier to use another ink.
            Lithographic inks are usually less greasy or loose and have good covering
            power.
            Hope this helps,
            Charlie Jones



            LaNana Creek Press
            Nacogdoches, Texas

            On 11/1/06, thistleberry_press <etsu4@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Hi,
            >
            > I apologize in advance for this question because I'm positive that it
            > has been discussed here before but I've been fighting with my press all
            > day and it won (the rematch is tomorrow) and I'm just tired and not
            > thinking straight. What substance can be used to stiffen up loose ink?
            > I know of corn starch but I also know there is something else and I just
            > can't remember what it is. Again, I apologize but any answer would be
            > greatly appreciated.
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > Bethany Carter Kneff
            >
            > ThistleBerry Press
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Tim Benas
            Good old body gum available from any graphic supply house will stiffen up soupy ink.
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 2, 2006
              Good old body gum available from any graphic supply house will stiffen up
              soupy ink.
            • thistleberry_press
              Thanks everyone! I just got new rollers for my press and raised them quite a bit but am still getting a little ink squeeze on my prints and I thought I would
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 2, 2006
                Thanks everyone! I just got new rollers for my press and raised them
                quite a bit but am still getting a little ink squeeze on my prints and
                I thought I would try to stiffen the ink some and maybe that would
                help. I use Van Son oil based inks, and while we're on the subject, is
                there a recommended amount of how much Mag. Carbonate to add to the
                ink? Or is it basically just trial and error until you get it right?
                Should the ink then be really stiff or should it still be pretty
                workable on the slab? Thanks for all the advice!!

                Bethany Carter Kneff
                ThistleBerry Press
              • enkidu@hetnet.nl
                ... Dear Bethany, You should not have all this trouble with Van Sons s oil based ink. Are you sure your rolls are at the desired height ? There are some rolls
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 2, 2006
                  -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
                  > Van: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com namens thistleberry_press
                  > Verzonden: do 2-11-2006 17:00
                  > Aan: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                  > Onderwerp: [PPLetterpress] Re: loose ink
                  >
                  > Thanks everyone! I just got new rollers for my press and raised them
                  > quite a bit but am still getting a little ink squeeze on my prints and
                  > I thought I would try to stiffen the ink some and maybe that would
                  > help. I use Van Son oil based inks, and while we're on the subject, is
                  > there a recommended amount of how much Mag. Carbonate to add to the
                  > ink? Or is it basically just trial and error until you get it right?
                  > Should the ink then be really stiff or should it still be pretty
                  > workable on the slab? Thanks for all the advice!!
                  >
                  > Bethany Carter Kneff
                  > ThistleBerry Press

                  Dear Bethany,

                  You should not have all this trouble with Van Sons's oil based ink.

                  Are you sure your rolls are at the desired height ? There are some
                  rolls at typeheight that can be placed under the inked roll. With this
                  you can assure the rolls to ink the type all with the same pressure. If this
                  is not the case, you never get an even print.

                  two of these little typeheight cylinders placed on both sides of the bed
                  give you the possibility to adjust your rolls very accurate. Provided the rolls
                  are perfect cylinders too.

                  after testing the cylnders will have a strip of ink on top, 1.5 mm wide evrywhere
                  on the press will insure you even inking at all places.

                  are there none of these testing cylinders available in the USA ?

                  here a link forgive me the dutch language, the picture is enough I guess.

                  http://www.drukwerkindemarge.com/techniek/inktrollen_stellen.html

                  ......

                  Making the ink stiffer, will probably make an other addition to your troubles.

                  best wishes

                  John Cornelisse




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Gerald Lange
                  Bethany Magnesium carbonate is a very stable chemical buffer, thus it has a great many different industrial, and other, purposes and uses (rock climbers rub it
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 2, 2006
                    Bethany

                    Magnesium carbonate is a very stable chemical buffer, thus it has a
                    great many different industrial, and other, purposes and uses (rock
                    climbers rub it on their hands etc), so I would recommend that you buy
                    it from a printmaking supply house in a formulation properly milled
                    for use in ink.

                    If you are using a Vandercook the ink should be much stiffer than you
                    might want for a platen press. All the additive will do is increase
                    the viscosity of the ink (its resistance to flow). You can add too
                    much. Add it in small amounts until the ink slumps (like butter)
                    rather than puddles. When properly configured the ink should just hold
                    a shape. Carve a form into the ink on the slab, if it holds that
                    shape, you are there.

                    Gerald
                    http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


                    >
                    > Thanks everyone! I just got new rollers for my press and raised them
                    > quite a bit but am still getting a little ink squeeze on my prints and
                    > I thought I would try to stiffen the ink some and maybe that would
                    > help. I use Van Son oil based inks, and while we're on the subject, is
                    > there a recommended amount of how much Mag. Carbonate to add to the
                    > ink? Or is it basically just trial and error until you get it right?
                    > Should the ink then be really stiff or should it still be pretty
                    > workable on the slab? Thanks for all the advice!!
                    >
                    > Bethany Carter Kneff
                    > ThistleBerry Press
                    >
                  • alex brooks
                    Recently i ve switched from van son rubber base (which i was taught with and have used by default) to litho inks. I love them. Perfect for auto inking on the
                    Message 9 of 13 , Nov 2, 2006
                      Recently i've switched from van son rubber base (which i was taught
                      with and have used by default) to litho inks. I love them. Perfect
                      for auto inking on the vandercook, especially for woodcuts /
                      woodengravings. I just did a set of editions for a local artist -
                      woodcuts and engravings, and he wanted me to use some litho ink with
                      charbonnel mixed in- amazing for fine lines with no ink squeeze. $30/
                      lb but the end result is worth it.

                      I'd try some cheap daniel smith litho ink first. also don't try this
                      for hand inking or on a platen press.
                      -alex
                      press eight seventeen
                      lexington kentucky
                      >
                      >
                      > >
                      > > Thanks everyone! I just got new rollers for my press and raised them
                      > > quite a bit but am still getting a little ink squeeze on my
                      > prints and
                      > > I thought I would try to stiffen the ink some and maybe that would
                      > > help. I use Van Son oil based inks, and while we're on the
                      > subject, is
                      > > there a recommended amount of how much Mag. Carbonate to add to the
                      > > ink? Or is it basically just trial and error until you get it right?
                      > > Should the ink then be really stiff or should it still be pretty
                      > > workable on the slab? Thanks for all the advice!!
                      > >
                      > > Bethany Carter Kneff
                      > > ThistleBerry Press
                      > >
                      >



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • parallel_imp
                      ... [ . . . ] ... It d help to be more precise in describing inks, since litho ink describes most ink that is made. All the Van Son inks (oil, rubber,
                      Message 10 of 13 , Nov 3, 2006
                        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, alex brooks <alex@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Recently i've switched from van son rubber base (which i was taught
                        > with and have used by default) to litho inks.
                        [ . . . ]
                        > I'd try some cheap daniel smith litho ink first. also don't try this
                        > for hand inking or on a platen press.

                        It'd help to be more precise in describing inks, since "litho ink"
                        describes most ink that is made. All the Van Son inks (oil, rubber,
                        acrylic) are litho inks, intended for use on rotary offset
                        lithographic presses, but also suitable for letterpress work.
                        By "litho ink" do you mean ink intended for lithographic
                        printmaking, formulated for hand-rolling of litho stone or metal
                        plate? The Dan Smith litho inks would fall into that category.
                      • alex brooks
                        ... sorry- yes I meant printmaking ink for plate and stone lithography, not offset ink. In printmaking catalogs like Graphic Chemical they are know as litho
                        Message 11 of 13 , Nov 3, 2006
                          >>
                          >> It'd help to be more precise in describing inks, since "litho ink"
                          >> describes most ink that is made. All the Van Son inks (oil, rubber,
                          >> acrylic) are litho inks, intended for use on rotary offset
                          >> lithographic presses, but also suitable for letterpress work.
                          >> By "litho ink" do you mean ink intended for lithographic
                          >> printmaking, formulated for hand-rolling of litho stone or metal
                          >> plate? The Dan Smith litho inks would fall into that category.
                          sorry- yes I meant printmaking ink for plate and stone lithography,
                          not offset ink. In printmaking catalogs like Graphic Chemical they
                          are know as litho inks as opposed to relief printing or etching inks.
                          They are very stiff unlike Van Son which, depending upon the color,
                          can be almost soupy.
                          -alex
                        • Gerald Lange
                          Alex If you ever come across any of the Sinclair-Valentine Stone inks, buy em. The colors are great, especially the reds; never found a black. As I recall,
                          Message 12 of 13 , Nov 8, 2006
                            Alex

                            If you ever come across any of the Sinclair-Valentine "Stone" inks,
                            buy em. The colors are great, especially the reds; never found a
                            black. As I recall, crapola Flint Ink bought them out and with typical
                            corporate efficiency wiped them off the face of the earth, formulas
                            and all.

                            Gerald
                            http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



                            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, alex brooks <alex@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > >>
                            > >> It'd help to be more precise in describing inks, since "litho ink"
                            > >> describes most ink that is made. All the Van Son inks (oil, rubber,
                            > >> acrylic) are litho inks, intended for use on rotary offset
                            > >> lithographic presses, but also suitable for letterpress work.
                            > >> By "litho ink" do you mean ink intended for lithographic
                            > >> printmaking, formulated for hand-rolling of litho stone or metal
                            > >> plate? The Dan Smith litho inks would fall into that category.
                            > sorry- yes I meant printmaking ink for plate and stone lithography,
                            > not offset ink. In printmaking catalogs like Graphic Chemical they
                            > are know as litho inks as opposed to relief printing or etching inks.
                            > They are very stiff unlike Van Son which, depending upon the color,
                            > can be almost soupy.
                            > -alex
                            >
                          • Chad Pastotnik
                            All (or almost all) our holiday printing is done this year, here is some of the stuff: The 2007 calendars are done and make great gifts. Printed in four colors
                            Message 13 of 13 , Nov 13, 2006
                              All (or almost all) our holiday printing is done this year, here is
                              some of the stuff:

                              The 2007 calendars are done and make great gifts. Printed in four
                              colors on Frankfurt paper and includes moon phases, 5 3/4 x 5 1/4
                              inches.
                              http://deepwoodpress.com/calendar.html

                              Christmas cards: 19 different designs and a coaster for Santa.
                              http://deepwoodpress.com/holcards.html

                              New Art Nouveau dragonfly journals/blank books
                              http://deepwoodpress.com/journals.html

                              Chad

                              _____________________________

                              Chad Pastotnik
                              Deep Wood Press 231.587.0506
                              http://www.deepwoodpress.com
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