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Re: Wood word & Letterspacing

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  • Gerald Lange
    Dan If you have a printers saw (a Hammond Glider is ideal) you could probably cut what you need from wood furniture (printers furniture, that is). What did
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 22, 2006
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      Dan

      If you have a printers saw (a Hammond Glider is ideal) you could
      probably cut what you need from wood furniture (printers furniture,
      that is).

      What did they have to say about solvents?

      I'm not sure if you have mentioned it previously, if so, I couldn't
      find it, but what educational institution are you working out of?

      Gerald
      http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Dan Allen <deallen05@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks for the emotional support in joining me in my
      > outrage that I cannot use lead type in a letterpress
      > class. However the administration hired an "industrial
      > hygienist" out of New York City who did some sort of
      > wipe test and declared the press and shop "a toxic
      > disaster area that needed to be eradicated". End of
      > argument. Don't waste your breath. They wouldn't even
      > let me take the type away to my press shop because
      > they felt the possibility of some possible residual
      > liability so they PAID ( a lot ) for some toxic clean
      > up company to come get it and dispose of it properly.
      >
      > Problem at hand. I used to use lead spacers between
      > wood type words and for letterspacing ( yes I have
      > reglettes for line spacing ) Is there such a thing a
      > wood em and ens, etc, and where does one find them?
      >
      >
      >
      > __________________________________________________
      > Do You Yahoo!?
      > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
      > http://mail.yahoo.com
      >
    • wa0dfw@copper.net
      And these folks vote! Scary. Their minds cannot handle facts.
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 22, 2006
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        And these folks vote! Scary.

        Their minds cannot handle facts.




        >Thanks for the emotional support in joining me in my
        >outrage that I cannot use lead type in a letterpress
        >class. However the administration hired an "industrial
        >hygienist" out of New York City who did some sort of
        >wipe test and declared the press and shop "a toxic
        >disaster area that needed to be eradicated". End of
        >argument. Don't waste your breath. They wouldn't even
        >let me take the type away to my press shop because
        >they felt the possibility of some possible residual
        >liability so they PAID ( a lot ) for some toxic clean
        >up company to come get it and dispose of it properly.
        >
        >Problem at hand. I used to use lead spacers between
        >wood type words and for letterspacing ( yes I have
        >reglettes for line spacing ) Is there such a thing a
        >wood em and ens, etc, and where does one find them?
        >
        >
        >
        >__________________________________________________
        >Do You Yahoo!?
        >Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        >http://mail.yahoo.com
      • Fritz Klinke
        Someone with a printer s saw can cut spacing for you to just about any width, and then to length for the various line sizes you have. I have cut some as small
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 22, 2006
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          Someone with a printer's saw can cut spacing for you to just about any width, and then to length for the various line sizes you have. I have cut some as small as 4 points wide using soft maple and it makes for beautiful spacing. I use it for fonting type that we sell, but with a Hammond or other saw with a point micrometer scale, it can be done. One point spacing is available in brass and steel, and that can be cut to the line size of the wood type.

          Fritz

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Scott Rubel
          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, August 22, 2006 7:14 PM
          Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Wood word & Letterspacing


          Can you send us the addresses where we can write so that they at
          least can slither though the remainder of their feckless lives
          knowing they are a despicable load of bureaucratic nincompoops who
          are more toxic to civilization than any heavy metal? I would pay by
          the pound to have them carted off to the steaming heap where they
          belong.

          Sorry I still can't help you with your spacing issues. How about legos?

          --Scott Rubel

          On Aug 22, 2006, at 5:58 PM, Dan Allen wrote:

          > Thanks for the emotional support in joining me in my
          > outrage that I cannot use lead type in a letterpress
          > class. However the administration hired an "industrial
          > hygienist" out of New York City who did some sort of
          > wipe test and declared the press and shop "a toxic
          > disaster area that needed to be eradicated". End of
          > argument. Don't waste your breath. They wouldn't even
          > let me take the type away to my press shop because
          > they felt the possibility of some possible residual
          > liability so they PAID ( a lot ) for some toxic clean
          > up company to come get it and dispose of it properly.
          >
          > Problem at hand. I used to use lead spacers between
          > wood type words and for letterspacing ( yes I have
          > reglettes for line spacing ) Is there such a thing a
          > wood em and ens, etc, and where does one find them?




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • typetom@aol.com
          In a message dated 8/22/2006, deallen05@yahoo.com writes: Is there such a thing a wood em and ens, etc, and where does one find them? There is steel
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 22, 2006
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            In a message dated 8/22/2006, deallen05@... writes:

            Is there such a thing a wood em and ens, etc, and where does one find them?



            There is steel furniture that will fit the bill in certain sizes. Also,
            wood furniture can be cut to various lengths to serve. Both come in pica widths
            (as well as lengths) that should match wood type.

            Sorry to hear of the ignorance that sweeps past us now and again.
            Best wishes,
            Tom

            Tom Parson
            Now It's Up To You Publications
            157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
            (303) 777-8951
            http://members.aol.com/typetom


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • wa0dfw@copper.net
            I ve never heard of or seen 3 point reglet (which doesn t by any means mean that it did not exist), however I have a quantity of 18pt reglet which is very
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 23, 2006
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              I've never heard of or seen 3 point reglet (which doesn't by any
              means mean that it did not exist), however I have a quantity of 18pt
              reglet which is very useful at times. I know Fritz has a quantity of
              it as well, for sale. That, along with 6 and 12 pt, and 2 pic
              furniture might make good spacing for larger wood type. A great
              quantity could be sawn on a lead and slug saw in a short time.

              ---- Original Message ----
              From: kwhalen.incline@...
              >Wooden reglet was made in 3pt and 6pt and 12 pt thicknesses, and you
              >might
              >try checking with Dave Churchman, Don Black, and so forth, to see if
              >they
              >have any packets available. 1, 2 and 3 point leads were also made
              >out of
              >colour-coded plastic strip at one time, so you might ask about that
              >too.
              >
              >The 12pt wooden reglet will cut with a saw, the smaller stuff with a
              >decent
              >levered lead cutter. Next sizes up from 12pt you should be able to
              >get from
              >Home Depot, where you might also find ornamental moulding that you
              >can use
              >for decorated borders, and wood to use as leads.
              >
              >Bon voyage!
              >
              >
              >Graham Moss
              >Incline Press
              >36 Bow Street
              >Oldham OL1 1SJ England
              >http://www.inclinepress.com
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • john cornelisse
              ... Hi, using leadtype, interlines of 1/2, 1, 2, 3 points are quite common, though the 1/2 point interlines are quite rare. up from 6 points interlines are
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 23, 2006
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                At 07:37 24/08/2006, you wrote:

                >I've never heard of or seen 3 point reglet (which doesn't by any
                >means mean that it did not exist),

                Hi,

                using leadtype, interlines of 1/2, 1, 2, 3 points are quite common,
                though the 1/2 point interlines are quite rare.

                up from 6 points interlines are called "reglets". Though I do not know
                whether this name still is used above 24 point thickness.

                The banning of lead is here in europe also an issue... They try to ban
                the use of lead in building houses. And running a caster in a museum...
                Burocrats are everywhere, and they do not like to take any risks at all.
                And sure they are not hamered by any intrinsic knowledge about the
                subject. By far no.

                best wishes

                John Cornelisse
              • Gerald Lange
                Hi John Well, I have 1/2-pt coppers and 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 6-pt interlines in brass, which I use to adjust magnetic bases into position. And I know that brass
                Message 7 of 10 , Aug 24, 2006
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                  Hi John

                  Well, I have 1/2-pt coppers and 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 6-pt "interlines" in
                  brass, which I use to adjust magnetic bases into position. And I know
                  that brass was run up to at least 24-pt (as "interlines" and rule).
                  Bit hard to find, but, situation being, NOT lead. Though I agree, this
                  thing about printers "lead" is quite off track. As are many popular
                  but il-considered politically-correct issues.

                  Gerald
                  http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

                  --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, john cornelisse <enkidu@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > At 07:37 24/08/2006, you wrote:
                  >
                  > >I've never heard of or seen 3 point reglet (which doesn't by any
                  > >means mean that it did not exist),
                  >
                  > Hi,
                  >
                  > using leadtype, interlines of 1/2, 1, 2, 3 points are quite common,
                  > though the 1/2 point interlines are quite rare.
                  >
                  > up from 6 points interlines are called "reglets". Though I do not know
                  > whether this name still is used above 24 point thickness.
                  >
                  > The banning of lead is here in europe also an issue... They try to ban
                  > the use of lead in building houses. And running a caster in a museum...
                  > Burocrats are everywhere, and they do not like to take any risks at all.
                  > And sure they are not hamered by any intrinsic knowledge about the
                  > subject. By far no.
                  >
                  > best wishes
                  >
                  > John Cornelisse
                  >
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