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Plate making!!

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  • ausart1938
    I have only just taken an interest in this new to me area. I have bought a book Printing with Photopolymer Plates by Dianne Longley and have been reading it.
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 8, 2002
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      I have only just taken an interest in this new to me area.
      I have bought a book Printing with Photopolymer Plates by Dianne
      Longley and have been reading it. Now I would like to have a go at
      making some plates for our letterpress machines. A friend has a box
      with UV light that he used to use to make circuit boards and we
      thought we would try this. Does the transparency on the laser printer
      work ok with these plates? The only dealer here that sells small
      quantities of plates is Marvelon DS94 has anyone had success with
      these? I am an old compositor and have to learn a few new tricks.
      We have an Olde Time Print Shoppe at Gulgong Pioneers Museum in
      Gulgong NSW Australia. All letterpress, hand set and hot metal, Lino,
      Intertype and Ludlow. I would like to use polymer plates to do work
      that we can't do now. We can get plates made but the last lot the top
      surface started to lift, I only used a rag dampened with kero to clean
      them.
    • Ed Inman
      ... with UV light that he used to use to make circuit boards and we thought we would try this. Does the transparency on the laser printer work ok with these
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 8, 2002
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        >>>A friend has a box
        with UV light that he used to use to make circuit boards and we
        thought we would try this. Does the transparency on the laser printer
        work ok with these plates? <<<<

        Practice is the key. I just recently had to do a wedding invitation with a
        delicate outline script face--as difficult a face as one could imagine to
        expose and print.

        So, first I thought I'd do the "smart" thing and take my negative to a local
        stamp shop that has a professional exposure and washout machine. Well, the
        results were terrible--the operator failed to keep the negative tight so the
        machine over-exposed the tiny lines in places and the plate was just a mess.

        It was the weekend by then so I had no choice but to go back and try to do
        them by hand. I exposed the tiny serifs for a full 45 minutes with my Sun
        Gun, then ever-so-gently washed out the plate with a hand brush--careful not
        to brish too hard in the image area. I left a little of the unexposed gooey
        polymer on the plate within the image areas to act as reinforcement in the
        post-exposure--which I did under natural sunlight.

        The results turned out just about perfect and the customer was very happy.

        So, for me it just reinforced my opinion that good work depends not
        necessarily on what sophisticated tools you have but rather on how well you
        know how to use and make the most of what is available to you.

        Ed
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