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Re: [PPLetterpress] world book fair

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  • Mark Wilden
    ... From: alex brooks ... Just to be clear, are you saying that you set type rightside up, such that the face is upside down? It seems to
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 6, 2006
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "alex brooks" <alex@...>

      > I hate this attitude....
      > no one sets type UPSIDE DOWN(probably my most hated printing
      > misconception).....
      > what a relic this is! [/sarcasm]

      Just to be clear, are you saying that you set type rightside up, such that
      the face is upside down?

      It seems to me that a type has no essential upside or downside. Most of the
      time, type is arranged in a galley with nicks away. But when overrunning a
      line, the opposite is done. Just a matter of convenience, rather than
      something essential about type.

      But I'm certainly no expert.

      ///ark
    • John G. Henry
      I have not found it practical to set type rightside up in a composing stick. You would have to start at the bottom of the copy in order to put the next line
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 6, 2006
        I have not found it practical to set type "rightside up" in a
        composing stick. You would have to start at the bottom of the copy
        in order to put the next line on top of the other, and I, for one,
        never know here I'm going to end. I usually know where to start.

        Large type might be set in a galley, but if setting type for pages
        of a book, the stick is essential to get all lines the correct
        length.

        Perhaps I'm missing something -- or I'm a relic as is the film
        referred to.

        John Henry
        Cedar Creek Press

        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Wilden" <mark@...> wrote:
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "alex brooks" <alex@...>
        >
        > > I hate this attitude....
        > > no one sets type UPSIDE DOWN(probably my most hated printing
        > > misconception).....
        > > what a relic this is! [/sarcasm]
        >
        > Just to be clear, are you saying that you set type rightside up,
        such that
        > the face is upside down?
        >
        > It seems to me that a type has no essential upside or downside.
        Most of the
        > time, type is arranged in a galley with nicks away. But when
        overrunning a
        > line, the opposite is done. Just a matter of convenience, rather
        than
        > something essential about type.
        >
        > But I'm certainly no expert.
        >
        > ///ark
        >
      • Gene
        ... I think the previous poster was making a funny. In setting type right side up you set the type with the nick up, which makes the face upside down. This
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 6, 2006
          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "John G. Henry" <JohnH@...> wrote:

          I think the previous poster was making a funny.

          In setting type "right side up" you set the type with the nick up, which makes the face
          upside down.

          This is the correct and only way to set type in a type stick.

          Gene McCluney
          Old Van Buren Press
        • Mark Wilden
          ... From: John G. Henry ... Sorry I wasn t clear. Yes, type is set with the faces upside down in the stick. When it s dumped to a galley,
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 6, 2006
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "John G. Henry" <JohnH@...>

            >I have not found it practical to set type "rightside up" in a
            >composing stick. You would have to start at the bottom of the copy
            >in order to put the next line on top of the other, and I, for one,
            >never know here I'm going to end. I usually know where to start.

            Sorry I wasn't clear. Yes, type is set with the faces upside down in the
            stick. When it's dumped to a galley, it stays that way, because printers
            read faces upside down and left-to-right. However, when you notice a mistake
            in a proof, like leaving out a word, such that more than one line needs
            correction, you turn the type (or galley, I guess) around such that the end
            of the line is toward the open side of the galley, the faces are right-side
            up and the line reads from right to left. That way you can grab off words
            from the form in the correct order and put them back in the stick.

            I'm probably explaining this very poorly, but my only point was to suggest
            that there is no "up" and "down" for a type - it depends what you're doing
            with it.

            And I wouldn't be terribly surprised if I were completely wrong about that.

            ///ark
          • Lance Williams
            John, Any of us that have been at this Letterpress stuff for more than 20 years are definitely RELICS.... Since I am working on 27 years now, I guess that
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 6, 2006
              John,

              Any of us that have been at this Letterpress stuff for more than 20 years
              are definitely RELICS.... Since I am working on 27 years now, I guess that
              includes me <grin>.

              - Lance Williams
              Williams Stationery Co.
              Camden, New York
              APA #785


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: John G. Henry
              To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: 7/6/2006 2:55:40 PM
              Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: world book fair

              ....
              Perhaps I'm missing something -- or I'm a relic as is the film
              referred to.

              John Henry
              Cedar Creek Press
            • Mark Wilden
              ... From: Mark Wilden ... Tchah. Such that the -beginning- of the line is toward the open side of the galley, of course. ///ark
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 6, 2006
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Mark Wilden" <mark@...>

                > However, when you notice a mistake
                > in a proof, like leaving out a word, such that more than one line needs
                > correction, you turn the type (or galley, I guess) around such that the
                > end
                > of the line is toward the open side of the galley

                Tchah. Such that the -beginning- of the line is toward the open side of the
                galley, of course.

                ///ark
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