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envelope printing

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  • thistleberry_press
    Hello all, I have a need for some advice on a problem that is specific to the current job I m printing; is there a way to print response card envelopes, 4 bar
    Message 1 of 19 , Jun 28, 2006
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      Hello all,

      I have a need for some advice on a problem that is specific to the
      current job I'm printing; is there a way to print response card
      envelopes, 4 bar size, and get some impression without the wording
      showing through on the front side of the envelope? I'm working on a
      Vandercook No. 4, and it seems that even with a little impression
      the wording shows through on the front side of the envelope (where
      it closes). Now, I'm not talking about wanting a deep impression or
      anything but a little would be nice and wondered if anyone had any
      helpful hints.
      Also, when you print an envelope sometimes you're printing parts
      of the wording on two, even three layers of paper because of the way
      the envelope is put together. I build up the packing on the cylinder
      in the areas of the wording that are only printed on one layer to
      print evenly with the parts of the wording that are printed on two
      or three layers of paper. Is there a better way to do this? It can
      be tricky getting the layers even so that the wording will print
      consistently and just wondered if there was an alternative to my
      method.
      Any advice or helpful hints would be appreciated!
      Thanks, Bethany
    • Scott Rubel
      There is no way I know of to not have an impression show through. I always show this to a customer and that s what they learn to expect. The impression just
      Message 2 of 19 , Jun 28, 2006
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        There is no way I know of to not have an impression show through. I
        always show this to a customer and that's what they learn to expect. The
        impression just shows through, unless you have the patience and can
        charge enough to temporarily insert a shim of paper inside each
        envelope. The way they did this in the old days was print the envelope
        stock before it was converted, but that is only practical for huge runs,
        because you waste so much during the conversion set-up.

        What you describe in your second paragraph is make-ready, and that's
        what you've got to do when you're printing stuff like that. After a
        while you get used to it and can do it quickly and accurately. It is
        harder to do I think on a cylinder, but only takes a minute or two on a
        platen.

        --Scott

        thistleberry_press wrote:

        >Hello all,
        >
        > I have a need for some advice on a problem that is specific to the
        >current job I'm printing; is there a way to print response card
        >envelopes, 4 bar size, and get some impression without the wording
        >showing through on the front side of the envelope? I'm working on a
        >Vandercook No. 4, and it seems that even with a little impression
        >the wording shows through on the front side of the envelope (where
        >it closes). Now, I'm not talking about wanting a deep impression or
        >anything but a little would be nice and wondered if anyone had any
        >helpful hints.
        > Also, when you print an envelope sometimes you're printing parts
        >of the wording on two, even three layers of paper because of the way
        >the envelope is put together. I build up the packing on the cylinder
        >in the areas of the wording that are only printed on one layer to
        >print evenly with the parts of the wording that are printed on two
        >or three layers of paper. Is there a better way to do this? It can
        >be tricky getting the layers even so that the wording will print
        >consistently and just wondered if there was an alternative to my
        >method.
        >Any advice or helpful hints would be appreciated!
        >Thanks, Bethany
        >
      • Peter Fraterdeus
        Bethany I assume you are talking about printing on the flap? If so, one solution is simply to open the flaps on all the envs and print them that way.
        Message 3 of 19 , Jun 28, 2006
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          Bethany

          I assume you are talking about printing on the flap?
          If so, one solution is simply to open the flaps on all the envs and print them that way.

          Otherwise, while it's certainly possible to minimize the issues with makeready, it's always going to be a problem.

          Of course, the best way to print envelopes is before the paper is cut and folded into envelopes ;-)
          (in other words, for small numbers, just make yer own! A pattern template, stainless steel x-acto and a glue stick will go along way! )

          P

          >Hello all,
          >
          > I have a need for some advice on a problem that is specific to the
          >current job I'm printing; is there a way to print response card
          >envelopes, 4 bar size, and get some impression without the wording
          >showing through on the front side of the envelope? I'm working on a
          >Vandercook No. 4, and it seems that even with a little impression
          >the wording shows through on the front side of the envelope (where
          >it closes). Now, I'm not talking about wanting a deep impression or
          >anything but a little would be nice and wondered if anyone had any
          >helpful hints.
          > Also, when you print an envelope sometimes you're printing parts
          >of the wording on two, even three layers of paper because of the way
          >the envelope is put together. I build up the packing on the cylinder
          >in the areas of the wording that are only printed on one layer to
          >print evenly with the parts of the wording that are printed on two
          >or three layers of paper. Is there a better way to do this? It can
          >be tricky getting the layers even so that the wording will print
          >consistently and just wondered if there was an alternative to my
          >method.
          >Any advice or helpful hints would be appreciated!
          >Thanks, Bethany
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          --
          AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@
          ARTQ: Help stop in-box bloat! Always Remember to Trim the Quote!

          Semiotx Inc. http://typeandmeaning.com
          Web Strategy Consulting Communication Design Typography

          Peter Fraterdeus http://www.fraterdeus.com http://www.galenaphotos.com
          Galena, Illinois http://www.alphabets.com
          Photography Irish Fiddle Political Observation
          Philosophy Fonts Lettering
        • Sean Michael
          Bethany, It is totally possible to print an envelope without the impression showing through. The book Elementary Platen Presswork, By Ralph W. Polk & Edwin
          Message 4 of 19 , Jun 28, 2006
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            Bethany, It is totally possible to print an envelope without the impression showing through.
            The book Elementary Platen Presswork, By Ralph W. Polk & Edwin Polk has an excellent
            description of how to do just this. I know this book is for platen printing, but it is an
            excellent resource anyway. http://speakspress.net/resources.htm

            If I can do it on my platen, surely it can be done on a Vandercook. Careful makeready is the
            key.
          • heidrun mumper-drumm
            Envelopes are tricky, but there are a few rules to follow which eliminate the show through and deal with varying thick ness of paper: 1/ Always print open
            Message 5 of 19 , Jun 28, 2006
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              Envelopes are tricky, but there are a few rules to follow which eliminate the show through and deal with varying thick ness of paper:

              1/ Always print 'open flap,' both when you are printing on the flap and also when you are printing on the front, and

              2/ design your text to fit within the same amount of 'layers'–no crossing from one thickness to another.

              Heidrun



              -----Original Message-----
              >From: thistleberry_press <etsu4@...>
              >Sent: Jun 28, 2006 10:58 AM
              >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [PPLetterpress] envelope printing
              >
              >Hello all,
              >
              > I have a need for some advice on a problem that is specific to the
              >current job I'm printing; is there a way to print response card
              >envelopes, 4 bar size, and get some impression without the wording
              >showing through on the front side of the envelope? I'm working on a
              >Vandercook No. 4, and it seems that even with a little impression
              >the wording shows through on the front side of the envelope (where
              >it closes). Now, I'm not talking about wanting a deep impression or
              >anything but a little would be nice and wondered if anyone had any
              >helpful hints.
              > Also, when you print an envelope sometimes you're printing parts
              >of the wording on two, even three layers of paper because of the way
              >the envelope is put together. I build up the packing on the cylinder
              >in the areas of the wording that are only printed on one layer to
              >print evenly with the parts of the wording that are printed on two
              >or three layers of paper. Is there a better way to do this? It can
              >be tricky getting the layers even so that the wording will print
              >consistently and just wondered if there was an alternative to my
              >method.
              >Any advice or helpful hints would be appreciated!
              >Thanks, Bethany
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >


              Heidrun Mumper-Drumm + Design and Letterpress
              drummbeat@...
              tel 626 583 8166
            • Warren Gailbreath, Jr.
              Bethany: There may be some tricks of the trade somebody that runs a Vandercook might be able to tell you about but I can only share my thoughts on your
              Message 6 of 19 , Jun 28, 2006
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                Bethany:

                There may be some tricks of the trade somebody that
                runs a Vandercook might be able to tell you about but
                I can only share my thoughts on your problem.

                Depending on your amount it may be good to unfold the
                flaps on the envelopes before printing instead of
                trying to print the combined envelope.

                You will have to do a makeready that takes into
                consideration the overlapping sections of paper on the
                envelope. There is no way around this as you have to
                get an even impression for good print.

                Be sure the envelopes are manufactured without
                variance in placement of the flap overlap. If they
                change around you will get some that print nice and
                then some that will print too heavy because of the
                change in the dimensions of the overlapping areas of
                the envelope.

                If the back flap is where your printing I would
                unfold, print and refold when dry.



                Warren Gailbreath,Jr.
                Southwest Finishing, Inc.
                Ft.Worth, Texas
              • RoyVM@aol.com
                Bethany, When I make ready envelopes for foil stamping or printing, I usually start with two envelopes. Place one on top of the other and accurately cut away
                Message 7 of 19 , Jun 28, 2006
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                  Bethany,

                  When I make ready envelopes for foil stamping or printing, I usually start
                  with two envelopes.

                  Place one on top of the other and accurately cut away those areas on one
                  envelope until the total thickness of both envelopes together is the exactly the
                  same.

                  I place the cut out envelope under the tympan in exactly the same position
                  as the one I
                  am stamping or imprinting.

                  Then you can make minor changes with make ready tape as necessary.

                  Roy


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • typetom@aol.com
                  One trick for make-ready with envelopes is to mark and disassemble another identical envelope, and then cut away the marked parts of the second envelope so
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jun 28, 2006
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                    One trick for make-ready with envelopes is to mark and disassemble another
                    identical envelope, and then cut away the marked parts of the second envelope
                    so that it can be used in the packing to equalize the layers of the envelope
                    you are printing. It is easier to position a re-folded, cut envelope in the
                    packing, than to position separate pieces of paper -- it goes exactly the same
                    position as the envelope being printed (which can be located by cutting two
                    small V slits through the envelope and the tympan before positioning it below
                    the tympan sheet).

                    The other question about the impression showing through can be minimized by
                    good make-ready, and hard packing, and by reducing the packing to reduce the
                    impression.
                    Best wishes,
                    Tom

                    Tom Parson
                    Now It's Up To You Publications
                    157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
                    (303) 777-8951
                    http://members.aol.com/typetom


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Lance Williams
                    Only one response to both of your points.... WHY?? I have been in the letterpress printing business for 26 years, and my family for over 90 years.... I have
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jun 28, 2006
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                      Only one response to both of your points.... WHY??

                      I have been in the letterpress printing business for 26 years, and my family for over 90 years.... I have NEVER printed envelopes with the flap opened. All it takes is a little work with makeready to even out the impression. And, in my letterpress printing career, I have printed over 50 MILLION envelopes in the past 26 years

                      To help out Bethany:

                      One method quite commonly used is exactly as Tom Parson described, using another envelope as a guide for adjusting the cutouts to adjust the impression. Just remember if you are refolding an envelope and putting it back into the packing as makeready, you have to take out TWO LAYERS of paper for every layer you need to remove, because by putting the envelope back into the packing, you are now doubling the number of envelopes you are printing upon (the one in the packing and the one you are actually printing.

                      It is harder to do the makeready on a cylinder press over a platen press, but if you cut registration slits into a printed envelope and through the packing BEFORE allowing it to be removed from the cylinder grippers, you will have a position to place the envelope onto one of the undersheets in the packing. At this point, I usually use just the top of the printed envelope, and cut from the top the major portion of the packing that needs to be removed. This would be all the areas that are one extra sheet of paper thick: overlap between the flap and the bottom and either the side, center or diagonal seams. If you glue this front panel of the envelope back into the packing, upon a sheet of equal weight paper in the packing to the envelope, you can then use the printing and existing cuts in the panel to make additional cuts on under-sheets for any third and possible 4th thicknesses of paper in the envelope. When you tighten the backing back up, everything should be positioned properly to the feeding of the envelope. Be sure to do all of this AFTER you have made all your final adjustment to the feed positioning, or you will end up out of position in your final printing.

                      After you have the basic cut out for the envelope, then you can make your makeready for the variances, if any. in the impression of your printing surface, be it photopolymer, hot metal composition, foundry type, metal engravings, linoleum or wood (or whatever else you may be printing with <grin>).

                      There was something else I was going to add to this discussion, but I got interrupted, and forgot what it was now.... So, if anyone else sees something I forgot or neglected, please feel free to add/correct....

                      Bethany (an anyone else), if you would like to talk further about envelope makeready, feel free to email me as part of the group or privately....

                      - Lance Williams
                      Williams Stationery Co.
                      Camden, New York
                      APA #785


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: heidrun mumper-drumm
                      To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: 6/28/2006 6:02:06 PM
                      Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] envelope printing


                      Envelopes are tricky, but there are a few rules to follow which eliminate the show through and deal with varying thick ness of paper:

                      1/ Always print 'open flap,' both when you are printing on the flap and also when you are printing on the front, and

                      2/ design your text to fit within the same amount of 'layers'�no crossing from one thickness to another.

                      Heidrun

                      -----Original Message-----
                      >From: thistleberry_press <etsu4@...>
                      >Sent: Jun 28, 2006 10:58 AM
                      >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: [PPLetterpress] envelope printing
                      >
                      >Hello all,
                      >
                      > I have a need for some advice on a problem that is specific to the
                      >current job I'm printing; is there a way to print response card
                      >envelopes, 4 bar size, and get some impression without the wording
                      >showing through on the front side of the envelope? I'm working on a
                      >Vandercook No. 4, and it seems that even with a little impression
                      >the wording shows through on the front side of the envelope (where
                      >it closes). Now, I'm not talking about wanting a deep impression or
                      >anything but a little would be nice and wondered if anyone had any
                      >helpful hints.
                      > Also, when you print an envelope sometimes you're printing parts
                      >of the wording on two, even three layers of paper because of the way
                      >the envelope is put together. I build up the packing on the cylinder
                      >in the areas of the wording that are only printed on one layer to
                      >print evenly with the parts of the wording that are printed on two
                      >or three layers of paper. Is there a better way to do this? It can
                      >be tricky getting the layers even so that the wording will print
                      >consistently and just wondered if there was an alternative to my
                      >method.
                      >Any advice or helpful hints would be appreciated!
                      >Thanks, Bethany
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      Heidrun Mumper-Drumm + Design and Letterpress
                      drummbeat@...
                      tel 626 583 8166




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • wa0dfw@copper.net
                      Much has been said, but no one mentioned the problems with different stocks. A smooth stock can usually be printed without impression showing through on the
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jun 28, 2006
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                        Much has been said, but no one mentioned the problems with different
                        stocks.

                        A smooth stock can usually be printed without impression showing
                        through on the back. Textured stocks are another problem. You must
                        "hit" them harder to make good impression or end up with ink only on
                        the higher spots. Those can be difficult to print without "debossing"
                        to the point that it punches through.

                        Envelope makeready, on a platen, is done by cutting away an envelope
                        to pack the press under the drawsheet. You do this on a light table
                        or window, cutting it so that there are a total of four sheets
                        anywhere counting the envelope and the packing. That means that there
                        will be completely cut out sections in the makeready envelope where
                        the envelope is four sheets thick in the center of the flap, one
                        sheet thickness along the glued overlapping joints, two sheets thick
                        in most other areas.

                        Then the makeready is placed beneath the envelope each time you print
                        until you get your form and alignment where you want it, then you
                        "stab" the tympan so you can align it below. I'm sure it can be done
                        similarly on a cylinder, though I've never done it.

                        Takes a bit of practice, and it helps if someone can work with you
                        the first time, though I'm sure that some of the printing books will
                        describe the process bette than I and possibly have photos to help.

                        Mo
                      • Angelique Felgentreff
                        Hi, I am finally getting my workspace ready for some printing at home and would like to get an appropriate paper cutter/trimmer (the days of uneven cuts with
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jun 29, 2006
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                          Hi,
                          I am finally getting my workspace ready for some printing at home and
                          would like to get an appropriate paper cutter/trimmer (the days of
                          uneven cuts with my fiskars rotary cutter are numbered). But I was
                          hoping that several of you might have some recommendations for kind,
                          size, etc. as it seems to be a big investment and I would like to try
                          to make sure I'm getting something that will do me right for a while
                          at least. If it matters, 6x10 is my chase size and I'm planning
                          simply printing social stationary and misc.
                          Lastly, if you have recommendations for sources, I'd appreciate that
                          too.
                          Thanks much in advance.
                          Angelique Felgentreff
                          Montara, CA
                        • Peter Fraterdeus
                          ... ... Also a good point. ... Thanks, Mo, for a nicely written description! This is exactly how I ve done it as well... on the platen C&P However, I don t
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jun 29, 2006
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                            At 5:49 AM +0000 29 06 06, wa0dfw@... wrote:
                            >Much has been said, but no one mentioned the problems with different
                            >stocks.
                            ...
                            Also a good point.

                            >Envelope makeready, on a platen, is done by cutting away an envelope
                            >to pack the press under the drawsheet. You do this on a light table
                            >or window, cutting it so that there are a total of four sheets
                            >anywhere counting the envelope and the packing. That means that there
                            >will be completely cut out sections in the makeready envelope where
                            >the envelope is four sheets thick in the center of the flap, one
                            >sheet thickness along the glued overlapping joints, two sheets thick
                            >in most other areas.

                            Thanks, Mo, for a nicely written description! This is exactly how I've done it as well... on the platen C&P

                            However, I don't think it would work very well on the cylinder *, and would, at the least cause way more trouble for our printer than simply opening the flaps on 135 envelopes.

                            * Due, in my mind's eye, to the fact that the layers will constantly be stressed by stretching forces on the cylinder. Printing on a cylinder is really a completely different animal than the platen press.

                            After all, Lance didn't print 50 million envelopes on a Vandercook ;-)

                            just my two cents...

                            best wishes from the northern Mississippi river watershed

                            Peter
                            galena illinois

                            AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@
                            ARTQ: Help stop in-box bloat! Always Remember to Trim the Quote!

                            Semiotx Inc. http://typeandmeaning.com
                            Web Strategy Consulting Communication Design Typography

                            Peter Fraterdeus http://www.fraterdeus.com http://www.galenaphotos.com
                            Galena, Illinois http://www.alphabets.com
                            Photography Irish Fiddle Political Observation
                            Philosophy Fonts Lettering


                            --
                          • Gene
                            ... My recommendation is to get as big a paper cutter as you can cram into your shop. The reason, is that purchasing paper in mill sized sheets is cheaper
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jun 29, 2006
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                              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Angelique Felgentreff <angelique@...> wrote:

                              My recommendation is to get as big a paper cutter as you can cram into
                              your shop. The reason, is that purchasing paper in mill sized sheets is
                              cheaper than purchasing paper in smaller sizes. Manual, lever style
                              cutters are rather plentiful. Many beautiful papers only come in "full
                              sheets", and if your paper cutter won't take them, you will have to have
                              them cut down elsewhere.

                              Gene McCluney
                              Old Van Buren Press





                              >
                              > Hi,
                              > I am finally getting my workspace ready for some printing at home and
                              > would like to get an appropriate paper cutter/trimmer (the days of
                              > uneven cuts with my fiskars rotary cutter are numbered). But I was
                              > hoping that several of you might have some recommendations for kind,
                              > size, etc. as it seems to be a big investment and I would like to try
                              > to make sure I'm getting something that will do me right for a while
                              > at least. If it matters, 6x10 is my chase size and I'm planning
                              > simply printing social stationary and misc.
                              > Lastly, if you have recommendations for sources, I'd appreciate that
                              > too.
                              > Thanks much in advance.
                              > Angelique Felgentreff
                              > Montara, CA
                              >
                            • Lance Williams
                              Peter, Actually, no, I didn t print them on a Vandercook, but the majority of our envelopes over the years have been printed on B. Verner Multipresses, which,
                              Message 14 of 19 , Jun 29, 2006
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                                Peter,

                                Actually, no, I didn't print them on a Vandercook, but the majority of our
                                envelopes over the years have been printed on B. Verner Multipresses,
                                which, if you are not familiar with them, are a very small diameter
                                cylinder press. The only advantage to them for envelope feeding, besides
                                the speed (6,000 iph), is that they feed into the bottom of the cylinder
                                and eject from the bottom as well. Bad thing is that there is no true
                                cylinder edge register (no cylinder grippers). This being said, they are
                                also much harder to do make-ready on since you can't stab an envelope to
                                set position on the packing, so you have to print on the packing to use as
                                a positional starting point.... (Pain in the butt at times...)

                                This being said, we have also printed several hundred thousand envelopes
                                on our V-50's as well.....

                                - Lance Williams
                                Williams Stationery Co.
                                Camden, New York
                                APA #785


                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: Peter Fraterdeus
                                To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: 6/29/2006 11:45:19 AM
                                Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] envelope printing


                                After all, Lance didn't print 50 million envelopes on a Vandercook ;-)

                                just my two cents...

                                best wishes from the northern Mississippi river watershed

                                Peter
                                galena illinois
                              • Gerald Lange
                                Angelique For the kind of work you are doing, your best bet is a Kutrimmer. There are some very good prices on these on the net. And they are a very reputable
                                Message 15 of 19 , Jun 30, 2006
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                                  Angelique

                                  For the kind of work you are doing, your best bet is a Kutrimmer.
                                  There are some very good prices on these on the net. And they are a
                                  very reputable tool. Gabriel Rummonds, in his book, Printing on the
                                  Iron Hand Press, recommends this over the guillotine type of cutter
                                  and I would have to agree. I've got a Kutrimmer and others as well as
                                  a Challenge 265 guillotine and while I do find the latter
                                  indispensable the Rummonds' suggestion is quite on the mark for
                                  non-commercial shops.

                                  Gerald Lange
                                  http://Bielerpress.blogspot.com


                                  -- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Angelique Felgentreff
                                  <angelique@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Hi,
                                  > I am finally getting my workspace ready for some printing at home and
                                  > would like to get an appropriate paper cutter/trimmer (the days of
                                  > uneven cuts with my fiskars rotary cutter are numbered). But I was
                                  > hoping that several of you might have some recommendations for kind,
                                  > size, etc. as it seems to be a big investment and I would like to try
                                  > to make sure I'm getting something that will do me right for a while
                                  > at least. If it matters, 6x10 is my chase size and I'm planning
                                  > simply printing social stationary and misc.
                                  > Lastly, if you have recommendations for sources, I'd appreciate that
                                  > too.
                                  > Thanks much in advance.
                                  > Angelique Felgentreff
                                  > Montara, CA
                                  >
                                • thistleberry_press
                                  Gerald, Which model of Kutrimmer would you recommend? I looked them up the web and there are of course several to choose from and just wondered which one you
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Jun 30, 2006
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                                    Gerald,

                                    Which model of Kutrimmer would you recommend? I looked them up the
                                    web and there are of course several to choose from and just wondered
                                    which one you use. I recently purchased a machine that is quite
                                    similar to the Martin Yale 7000E and ended up returning it because of
                                    the fact that it didn't cut straight and would not cut more than one
                                    300 lb. sheet of paper at a time. I would also be cutting down small
                                    items, I have my parent sheets cut down at a local print shop (very
                                    nice people, never let me pay for it). Any advice is always
                                    appreciated! Thanks and have a great Friday, Bethany
                                  • Peter Fraterdeus
                                    ... Ah right... In any case, the makeready on a cylinder is fraught with different issues than the C&P ... Nice to know people are still writing ;-) (I expect
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Jun 30, 2006
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                                      On Jun 29, 2006, at 2:23 PM, Lance Williams wrote:

                                      > Peter,
                                      >
                                      > Actually, no, I didn't print them on a Vandercook, but the
                                      > majority of our
                                      > envelopes over the years have been printed on B. Verner Multipresses,
                                      > which, if you are not familiar with them, are a very small diameter
                                      > cylinder press. ...backing to use as
                                      > a positional starting point.... (Pain in the butt at times...)

                                      Ah right... In any case, the makeready on a cylinder is fraught with
                                      different issues than the C&P

                                      >
                                      > This being said, we have also printed several hundred thousand
                                      > envelopes
                                      > on our V-50's as well.....

                                      Nice to know people are still writing ;-)
                                      (I expect these were not scented envelopes, though...)

                                      Best
                                      Peter

                                      AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@
                                      ARTQ: Help stop in-box bloat! Always Remember to Trim the Quote!

                                      Semiotx Inc. http://typeandmeaning.com
                                      Web Strategy Consulting Communication Design Typography
                                      Peter Fraterdeus http://www.fraterdeus.com | http://
                                      www.galenaphotos.com
                                    • Rodney Grantham
                                      We use 40 durometer photopolymer to print on paper bags and wooden tokens. It s nearly impossible to crush. When I went to printing school some 40 years ago,
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Jun 30, 2006
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                                        We use 40 durometer photopolymer to print on paper bags and wooden
                                        tokens. It's nearly impossible to crush.

                                        When I went to printing school some 40 years ago, we were taught to
                                        stab the tympan to register the makeready. I thought I died and went
                                        to heaven when photopolymer came out.

                                        Rod Grantham
                                        www.granthams.com/Projects
                                      • Farida Bee
                                        Angelique, Last year I bought a Kutrimmer. Yes, it was a big investment, but for such an essential tool it was well worth it. I opted for the largest tabletop
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Jul 8, 2006
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                                          Angelique,

                                          Last year I bought a Kutrimmer. Yes, it was a big investment, but for such an essential tool it was well worth it. I opted for the largest tabletop model because it’s big enough to cut down most parent sheets. I would have preferred a floor model but space wise, it wouldn’t have been a practical choice. A guillotine may come in handy in the future, but for now this model suits my needs.

                                          All the best,

                                          Farida Sunada
                                          Alhambra, California



                                          From: Angelique Felgentreff <angelique@...>

                                          I am finally getting my workspace ready for some printing at home and
                                          would like to get an appropriate paper cutter/trimmer (the days of
                                          uneven cuts with my fiskars rotary cutter are numbered). But I was
                                          hoping that several of you might have some recommendations for kind,
                                          size, etc. as it seems to be a big investment and I would like to try
                                          to make sure I'm getting something that will do me right for a while
                                          at least.
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