Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

laser engraving

Expand Messages
  • Bryce Erickson
    Michael Barnes - I have successfully engraved printable images on quarter inch thick phenolic sheets. I used a local laser engraving shop, but do not know
    Message 1 of 11 , May 4, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Michael Barnes -
      I have successfully engraved printable images on quarter inch thick
      phenolic sheets. I used a local laser engraving shop, but do not know
      what kind of laser equipment they were running. They weren't too keen
      on using the usual acrylic or plexiglas because the laser tends to melt
      the material. The phenolic worked well and maintained detail up to
      150lpi. It's also extremely durable, surviving pressure glueing to a
      wood base and repeated wash-ups using solvent. I believe phenolic is
      readily available from plastics suppliers. Mine came from Lee Valley
      Tools <http://www.leevalley.com>. It is also workable by hand with
      standard wood-engraving tools although extra hand/arm pressure is
      needed.
      Regards,
      Bryce Erickson
      Saskatoon SK Canada
    • bielerpr
      I took the workshop on using the laser engravers at Art Center. Quite amazing. I can see all sorts of uses for this. Rebuilding wood type collections, cutting
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 2, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        I took the workshop on using the laser engravers at Art Center. Quite
        amazing. I can see all sorts of uses for this. Rebuilding wood type
        collections, cutting wood engravings, keeping artifacts of specific
        forms, etc.

        This will even engrave halftones (though I don't know yet the
        effective line screen) and can alter depth of surface for other
        effects. The line of cut and/or engraving is almost not measurable so
        quite fine forms could be created. The depth of cut is limited to
        half an inch and the machines at Art Center don't cut metal but
        almost anything else is fair game (unless the material produces toxic
        fumes). So some kind of a base is necessary. I'll keep you informed.

        Gerald
      • Bryce Erickson
        Gerald and Group - Any printed or electronic outcomes of the Art Center workshop would be of interest. But for most folks, exploring the printing potential of
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 2, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Gerald and Group -

          Any printed or electronic outcomes of the Art Center workshop would be of
          interest. But for most folks, exploring the printing potential of laser
          engraving means dealing with service bureaus that have no knowledge of
          print-making or letterpress. Their business, on the consumer side, is
          engraving plaques, trophies, souvenirs, etc. and, on the commercial side,
          engraving industial ID tags, everything from gas meter serial number plates
          to bovine ear tags. With some persistence, one can find an engraver willing
          to put up with a letterpress printer. The company I use claims to be able
          to achieve 150 lpi on most synthetic materials. They also do halftone
          engraving on some light metal although the examples i saw were photo
          positives. Toxic fumes are dealt with by enclosing the engaver in a fume
          hood. Bad for the environment but safe for the operators. I have printed
          images from laser engravings on phenolic (high density) plastic and on wood
          called (in Canada) K-3 board or particle board.

          Bryce Erickson
          Saskatoon SK Canada

          bielerpr wrote:

          > I took the workshop on using the laser engravers at Art Center. Quite
          > amazing. I can see all sorts of uses for this. Rebuilding wood type
          > collections, cutting wood engravings, keeping artifacts of specific
          > forms, etc.
          >
          > This will even engrave halftones (though I don't know yet the
          > effective line screen) and can alter depth of surface for other
          > effects. The line of cut and/or engraving is almost not measurable so
          > quite fine forms could be created. The depth of cut is limited to
          > half an inch and the machines at Art Center don't cut metal but
          > almost anything else is fair game (unless the material produces toxic
          > fumes). So some kind of a base is necessary. I'll keep you informed.
          >
          > Gerald
          >
          >
          > To respond to this message or post a message to the membership:
          > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Encountering problems?
          > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        • bielerpr
          ... Dear Bryce Thanks for the info and ideas here. I was wondering how successful were you on printing with these materials say compared to metal type or
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 2, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In PPLetterpress@y..., Bryce Erickson <beric8@s...> wrote:
            > Gerald and Group -
            >
            > Any printed or electronic outcomes of the Art Center workshop would be of
            > interest. But for most folks, exploring the printing potential of laser
            > engraving means dealing with service bureaus that have no knowledge of
            > print-making or letterpress. Their business, on the consumer side, is
            > engraving plaques, trophies, souvenirs, etc. and, on the commercial side,
            > engraving industial ID tags, everything from gas meter serial number plates
            > to bovine ear tags. With some persistence, one can find an engraver willing
            > to put up with a letterpress printer. The company I use claims to be able
            > to achieve 150 lpi on most synthetic materials. They also do halftone
            > engraving on some light metal although the examples i saw were photo
            > positives. Toxic fumes are dealt with by enclosing the engaver in a fume
            > hood. Bad for the environment but safe for the operators. I have printed
            > images from laser engravings on phenolic (high density) plastic and on wood
            > called (in Canada) K-3 board or particle board.
            >
            > Bryce Erickson
            > Saskatoon SK Canada
            >

            Dear Bryce

            Thanks for the info and ideas here. I was wondering how successful were you on printing with these materials say compared
            to metal type or photopolymer?


            I'd agree with what you have to say here, which I am singularly
            interpreting (perhaps mistakenly) as limited access to technology and associated costs. On
            the other hand, is this not the case with other printing technologies
            as well?

            As an example: Even though the artifacts of metal letterpress are scattered like the
            bones of buffalo across the vast plains of eBay that does not mean
            that this technology itself was cheaply accessible in its commercial
            heyday. The cost of new presses, casting equipment, foundry type, etc
            was quite prohibitive. If you were to try and have a typeface cast in
            foundry type today you would find you would probably have to appeal
            to the singular likes of a Theo Rehak and the associated costs would
            also be quite prohibitive. And Theo can only do so much as he himself
            is limited to the yet available manufactured elements that were
            required to make the whole process produce a single piece of type.

            I believe this applies in a not disimilar fashion to digital type as
            well. A well drawn technically functional typeface is quite expensive
            to undertake. I know, I had to have a quite complex face commissioned
            as part of a project and it cost almost as much as one of those
            digital laser engravers. Had there been more than one purchaser
            obviously the price would drop down in parcelling it out. But even in
            this instance (taking into account the historical development of software/hardware), it is quite clear to me that the single resultant
            product of any printing technology is the result of enormous
            investment that the end consumer can rare imagine.

            For most of us here, letterpress is a hobby, for some a semblance of a
            livelihood, a few do well enough; but we do not represent a viable
            market for any of these technologies. At best all we are doing is
            picking up the scraps here and there, making this work with that or that with this, and
            deriving pleasure or other gain out of the undertaking. And that is quite
            an accomplishment.

            I am getting more and more folks providing me with laser printed fake
            negs pumped up with toner enhancing spray. Why? They don't want to go
            to the service bureau or can't afford to, or for the project they
            have in mind, don't feel it is warranted. And they have found an
            alternative that works well enough for what they are doing.

            There is
            always a way, whether you take the low road or the high road, you've going to get there; all you have to do is keep moving on down that old "type road."

            All best

            Gerald
          • Neil Giroux
            Page 2. I have been working with a laser-equipped machine shop for some time to cut .50 copper matrices from digital type programs for use in a hand-casting
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 3, 2002
            • 0 Attachment
              Page 2. I have been working with a laser-equipped machine shop
              for some time to cut .50 copper matrices from digital type
              programs for use in a hand-casting mould. The process work fine
              (mostly) but tends to be somewhat costly. And the learning curve
              for the machinist is a bit steep, too.

              bielerpr wrote:

              > --- In PPLetterpress@y..., Bryce Erickson <beric8@s...> wrote:
              >
              > > Gerald and Group -
              > >
              > > Any printed or electronic outcomes of the Art Center workshop
              > would be of
              > > interest. But for most folks, exploring the printing
              > potential of laser
              > > engraving means dealing with service bureaus that have no
              > knowledge of
              > > print-making or letterpress. Their business, on the consumer
              > side, is
              > > engraving plaques, trophies, souvenirs, etc. and, on the
              > commercial side,
              > > engraving industial ID tags, everything from gas meter serial
              > number plates
              > > to bovine ear tags. With some persistence, one can find an
              > engraver willing
              > > to put up with a letterpress printer. The company I use
              > claims to be able
              > > to achieve 150 lpi on most synthetic materials. They also do
              > halftone
              > > engraving on some light metal although the examples i saw
              > were photo
              > > positives. Toxic fumes are dealt with by enclosing the
              > engaver in a fume
              > > hood. Bad for the environment but safe for the operators.
              > I have printed
              > > images from laser engravings on phenolic (high density)
              > plastic and on wood
              > > called (in Canada) K-3 board or particle board.
              > >
              > > Bryce Erickson
              > > Saskatoon SK Canada
              > >
              >
              > Dear Bryce
              >
              > Thanks for the info and ideas here. I was wondering how
              > successful were you on printing with these materials say
              > compared
              > to metal type or photopolymer?
              >
              >
              > I'd agree with what you have to say here, which I am singularly
              >
              > interpreting (perhaps mistakenly) as limited access to
              > technology and associated costs. On
              > the other hand, is this not the case with other printing
              > technologies
              > as well?
              >
              > As an example: Even though the artifacts of metal letterpress
              > are scattered like the
              > bones of buffalo across the vast plains of eBay that does not
              > mean
              > that this technology itself was cheaply accessible in its
              > commercial
              > heyday. The cost of new presses, casting equipment, foundry
              > type, etc
              > was quite prohibitive. If you were to try and have a typeface
              > cast in
              > foundry type today you would find you would probably have to
              > appeal
              > to the singular likes of a Theo Rehak and the associated costs
              > would
              > also be quite prohibitive. And Theo can only do so much as he
              > himself
              > is limited to the yet available manufactured elements that were
              >
              > required to make the whole process produce a single piece of
              > type.
              >
              > I believe this applies in a not disimilar fashion to digital
              > type as
              > well. A well drawn technically functional typeface is quite
              > expensive
              > to undertake. I know, I had to have a quite complex face
              > commissioned
              > as part of a project and it cost almost as much as one of those
              >
              > digital laser engravers. Had there been more than one purchaser
              >
              > obviously the price would drop down in parcelling it out. But
              > even in
              > this instance (taking into account the historical development
              > of software/hardware), it is quite clear to me that the single
              > resultant
              > product of any printing technology is the result of enormous
              > investment that the end consumer can rare imagine.
              >
              > For most of us here, letterpress is a hobby, for some a
              > semblance of a
              > livelihood, a few do well enough; but we do not represent a
              > viable
              > market for any of these technologies. At best all we are doing
              > is
              > picking up the scraps here and there, making this work with
              > that or that with this, and
              > deriving pleasure or other gain out of the undertaking. And
              > that is quite
              > an accomplishment.
              >
              > I am getting more and more folks providing me with laser
              > printed fake
              > negs pumped up with toner enhancing spray. Why? They don't want
              > to go
              > to the service bureau or can't afford to, or for the project
              > they
              > have in mind, don't feel it is warranted. And they have found
              > an
              > alternative that works well enough for what they are doing.
              >
              > There is
              > always a way, whether you take the low road or the high road,
              > you've going to get there; all you have to do is keep moving on
              > down that old "type road."
              >
              > All best
              >
              > Gerald
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              ADVERTISEMENT


              >
              > To respond to this message or post a message to the membership:
              >
              > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Encountering problems?
              > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              > Service.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Gaylord Schanilec
              Cutting wood engravings? Sounds like fighting with one hand tied behind your back--or both. Gaylor.d
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 3, 2002
              • 0 Attachment
                Cutting wood engravings? Sounds like fighting with one hand tied behind your
                back--or both. Gaylor.d

                bielerpr wrote:

                > I took the workshop on using the laser engravers at Art Center. Quite
                > amazing. I can see all sorts of uses for this. Rebuilding wood type
                > collections, cutting wood engravings, keeping artifacts of specific
                > forms, etc.
                >
                > This will even engrave halftones (though I don't know yet the
                > effective line screen) and can alter depth of surface for other
                > effects. The line of cut and/or engraving is almost not measurable so
                > quite fine forms could be created. The depth of cut is limited to
                > half an inch and the machines at Art Center don't cut metal but
                > almost anything else is fair game (unless the material produces toxic
                > fumes). So some kind of a base is necessary. I'll keep you informed.
                >
                > Gerald
                >
                >
                > To respond to this message or post a message to the membership:
                > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                >
                > Encountering problems?
                > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              • Bryce Erickson
                ... Sorry folks for the posting in error. I ll try again. The laser-engraved phenolic prints well and, at least in my experience, is comparable to
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 3, 2002
                • 0 Attachment
                  >
                  >
                  > Dear Bryce
                  >
                  > Thanks for the info and ideas here. I was wondering how successful were you on printing with these materials say compared
                  > to metal type or photopolymer?

                  Sorry folks for the posting in error. I'll try again.
                  The laser-engraved phenolic prints well and, at least in my experience, is comparable to photopolymer plate. The phenolic is dimensionally stable and
                  remains completely flat even after engraving, print runs and wash-ups. The surface is extremely smooth, slippery almost, so I had to stay with a stiff ink
                  (Lewis Roberts Inc. Special Black, from Graphic Chemical & Ink). Another minor caveat: these non-standard materials all come in thicknesses related to
                  other industries (carpentry, construction, etc.) so backing them to achieve type height is tricky.
                  The K-3 or particle board, by the very nature of its manufacture (heat pressed sawdust binder mixture), does not give a very fine line for printing. Edges
                  softened a bit. Also, as a wood product, it is not dimensionally stable. I tried to 'insulate' several engraved particle board plates by coating them
                  with white shellac before starting the print work. Particle board's advantage: it's cheap and comes in 4 foot by 8 foot sheets.

                  Cheers,
                  Bryce Erickson
                • Erik Desmyter
                  ... cut .50 copper matrices from digital type programs for use in a hand-casting mould. I was under the impression (CO2?) lasers could cut most metals but not
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 3, 2002
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Neil Giroux wrote:
                    > I have been working with a laser-equipped machine shop for some time to
                    cut .50 copper matrices from digital type programs for use in a hand-casting
                    mould.

                    I was under the impression (CO2?) lasers could cut most metals but not
                    copper because of refection problems. What kind of laser were you using?

                    Erik
                  • bielerpr
                    ... Hi Gaylord I wonder if some of the folks who use a baren for woodcut printmaking might not feel the same way about those who use a mechanical press!!!
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 3, 2002
                    • 0 Attachment
                      --- In PPLetterpress@y..., Gaylord Schanilec <midnight@c...> wrote:
                      > Cutting wood engravings? Sounds like fighting with one hand tied behind your
                      > back--or both. Gaylor.d
                      >
                      > bielerpr wrote:
                      >

                      Hi Gaylord

                      I wonder if some of the folks who use a baren for woodcut printmaking
                      might not feel the same way about those who use a mechanical press!!!

                      http://www.barenforum.org

                      Interesting group. Right down there at the essence of it all.

                      All best

                      Gerald
                    • Katie Harper
                      I need to find a source for good quality rollers. I have used Brown Regrinding. Any other recommendations? Does anyone have a phone number for Brown? Also, the
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jun 3, 2002
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I need to find a source for good quality rollers. I have used Brown
                        Regrinding. Any other recommendations? Does anyone have a phone number for
                        Brown?

                        Also, the last time I got rollers recovered there, Bruce Brown said that the
                        material that makes up the rollers was almost impervious to just about all
                        solvents. Is this true? Someone else told me not to use oil on them, which
                        is scary, since I use baby oil as a first-step cleanup process. Any
                        suggestions?

                        Katie Harper
                        Ars Brevis Press
                        Cincinnati, OH
                      • Harold Kyle
                        ... 763-553-1461 2075 East Center Circle, Plymouth, MN 55441 ... Brown s rollers are pvc-nitrile rubber, which is resistant to just about every solvent except
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jun 6, 2002
                        • 0 Attachment
                          On 6/3/02 4:44 PM, "Katie Harper" <knharper@...> wrote:
                          > I need to find a source for good quality rollers. I have used Brown
                          > Regrinding. Any other recommendations? Does anyone have a phone number for
                          > Brown?
                          763-553-1461
                          2075 East Center Circle, Plymouth, MN 55441

                          > Also, the last time I got rollers recovered there, Bruce Brown said that the
                          > material that makes up the rollers was almost impervious to just about all
                          > solvents. Is this true?
                          Brown's rollers are pvc-nitrile rubber, which is resistant to just about
                          every solvent except "highly polar solvents such as acetone, and MEK, ozone,
                          chlorinated hydrocarbons and nitro hydrocarbons." Baby oil, ie white mineral
                          oil, is fine.

                          Harold

                          ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
                          Boxcar Press
                          Fine Printing and Binding ~ Digital Letterpress Supplies
                          640 Fellows Avenue ~ Syracuse, NY 13210
                          315-473-0930 ~ phone and fax
                          www.boxcarpress.com
                          ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.