Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: digital font recommendations??

Expand Messages
  • Gerald Lange
    Hi again ... Yeah, that s exactly the point. If I am configuring for very small text sizes I will also often bump up the weight a tad and also use the
    Message 1 of 13 , Apr 19, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi again
      > The nice thing about printing such a face on a relief press is that the natural expression of the technique will almost perfectly counter the optical thinning! (that is, the ink-spread and additional variables)
      Yeah, that's exactly the point.

      If I am configuring for very small text sizes I will also often bump up
      the weight a tad and also use the transform unit width and adjust the
      metrics a bit, but that has more to do with sort of a simplistic
      approach to optimization. It's not much but every little bit helps.

      Interesting info about adjusting for PS3. Pretty cool.

      Gerald




      Peter Fraterdeus wrote:
      >
      > I recall when I first set my Prospera font for my old newsletter MiceType, I had to add a stroke width to the text (this was in Pagemaker, I believe) when it was being set on the Linotronic. This helped to compensate for the loss of visual weight at smaller sizes. (This is the reverse of what you are doing, of course, but it may help clarify the issues involved!)
      >
      > I eventually added a 'book' weight to the family, which would show a bit more substance at text sizes.
      > However, when I would use the original weight in a mag plate for letterpress printing, Prospera performed beautifully.
      >
      > It's as if I'd started out intended to design a relief printing typeface.
      > In fact, the reason for the lighter design weight was, in those pre-Type 1 disclosure days (Fontographer would only produce PostScript Type 3), that the output on a Laserwriter was always far too dark, since there was no way to hint a Type 3 font.
      >
      > Also, one perennial problem with CAD font design is that the letters on screen are huge and elegant (I love zooming in on serifs), and thus one will always see an optically bolder letter. As the x-height becomes smaller, the area covered by the 'inked' or filled shapes in the glyph shrinks exponentially, and the eye sees more and more 'background' against which the stroke will seem to diminish even further...
      >
      > The nice thing about printing such a face on a relief press is that the natural expression of the technique will almost perfectly counter the optical thinning! (that is, the ink-spread and additional variables)
      >
      > Thus, as you say, there are digital faces which work quite well for PP LP without having to 'hack' them.
      >
      > Regards from Galena
      >
      > pf
      >
      > AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@
      > ARTQ: Help stop in-box bloat! Always Remember to Trim the Quote!
      >
      > Semiotx Inc. http://typeandmeaning.com
      > Web Strategy Consulting Communication Design Typography
      >
      > Peter Fraterdeus http://www.fraterdeus.com http://www.galenaphotos.com
      > Galena, Illinois http://www.alphabets.com
      > Photography Irish Fiddle Political Observation
      > Philosophy Fonts Lettering
      >
      >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.