Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Gutenberg book?

Expand Messages
  • Matt Kelsey
    The latest posts with the Gutenberg timeline and type/lettering samples are quite interesting, and have sparked my interest in readng more. It sounds like much
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 2, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      The latest posts with the Gutenberg timeline and type/lettering samples are
      quite interesting, and have sparked my interest in readng more. It sounds
      like much us in dispute, but at the risk of asking for the impossible,
      anyone want to hazard a recommendation for one of two books on Gutenberg et
      al for those interested in learning more?

      Matt


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gerald Lange
      Matt I d think that anything specifically about Guntenberg is of less use in that it would be chocked full of dubious biographical matter. There isn t enough
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 2, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Matt

        I'd think that anything specifically about Guntenberg is of less use
        in that it would be chocked full of dubious biographical matter. There
        isn't enough real biography to fill a small monograph. Most of the
        current in-print material is of this nature. The in-print Douglas
        Martin books may be of interest but they tend to stay very near
        popular history.

        You might be better off with studies focusing more on the Gutenberg
        Bible and the development of Western printing. I'd say useful starters
        are Janet Ing's _Johann Gutenberg and his Bible_ (1988), Elizabeth
        Eisenstein's _The printing press as an agent of change_ (1979), etc.
        Albert Kapr's _Johann Gutenberg_ (1986, trans. 1996) is quite useful,
        especially for the political background, though it is a bit puffed up
        with biographical speculation. Some of the classic older studies (but
        dated by later discoveries) are Aloys Ruppel's _Johannes Gutenberg:
        Sein Leben und Sein Werk_ (1939, reprinted 1967), T. L. DeVinne's _The
        Invention of Printing_ (1876) [wherein he discovers the adjustable
        mould], O. W. Fuhrmann, _Gutenberg and the Strasbourg Documents of
        1439_ (1940) [which contains many of the legal documents relating to
        Gutenberg]. Most of this stuff can be picked up by a search on
        antiquarian book lists. The bulk of Gutenberg studies is, of course,
        in more fugitive materials; articles, monographs and the like. And
        much harder to acquire. And much of it untranslated.

        Gerald



        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Matt Kelsey"
        <matthewkelsey@...> wrote:
        >
        > The latest posts with the Gutenberg timeline and type/lettering
        samples are
        > quite interesting, and have sparked my interest in readng more. It
        sounds
        > like much us in dispute, but at the risk of asking for the impossible,
        > anyone want to hazard a recommendation for one of two books on
        Gutenberg et
        > al for those interested in learning more?
        >
        > Matt
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.