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Re: [PPLetterpress] "Re: The King is Dead, ..."

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  • Per Werme
    To avoid making the textura--Carolingian issue too academic without visual excerpts, I ve put copies of these to the PPL file section. They come in this order:
    Message 1 of 51 , Apr 1, 2006
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      To avoid making the textura--Carolingian issue too academic without
      visual excerpts, I've put copies of these to the PPL file section.
      They come in this order:

      (gratia) Carolingian minuscule developed by Alcuin of York, abbot at
      Tour. Scolar and a kind of minister of culture at the Charlemagne
      court. The example originate from c. 870 by Amaler in Metz, in the
      youth pupil to Alcuin. A beautiful hand.

      (stameti) Textura type from a Missale, printed in Nürnberg 1491.

      (claris) Textura from a titlepage, woodcut 1497. (x-height 17 mm)

      (anime) Humanistic minuscule written in Bologna 1500. The step from
      the Carolingian miniscule is not far. The humanists in northern Italy
      and Petrarca in particular, were looking for a script better suitable
      for the their new literature. The black rotunda associated to
      liturgical and juridical matters. Humanism and renaissance wanted to
      recapture its cultural heritage and to look to the human being as
      itself and not as he/she should be to fit into the divine plan. They
      found the Carolingian miniscule in the belief it was the old Roman
      script -- lettera antica. Lucky us!
      We should have in mind Jenson and Griffo already set the standard for
      the printed roman type before this example was written, but though
      representative for the humanistic minuscule. Earlier h.m. could be
      less refined and with long ascenders and descenders.


      > Alcuin's script is much faster to write than the textura, as any
      > calligrapher can attest. The degradation, not evolution, of
      > Carolingian turned to heavier and more vertical strokes over the
      > course of four centuries, which, as they are written with a wider
      > pen and more distinct changes of direction, require more, not less,
      > time per letter.

      Yes, agree with you Peter.

      > The motive, as I mentioned, was not speed, but density. The
      > Caroline page, as you know, was a model of elegance and open space.
      > With vellum as expensive as ever, the scribes felt pressure to
      > squeeze the space out.

      This too.

      > Yes, density was an important criteria but most of the information out
      > there portrays the historical Carolingian as being a more difficult
      > letterform in regard to speed of writing compared to the historical
      > textura. It may not seem so to present day practitioners but that does
      > seem to be the general consensus. See the following link as an example

      Read the source you refered to Gerald, now I understand your point of
      view. The article mention protogothic script which can be written as
      easy as the Carolingian minuscule, but not faster! The protogothic
      is less broken than textura and not that tight. The number of strokes
      seems to be the same. Haven't tested though. Protogothic has
      remembrance of the latin variant rotunda.

      > [. . . ] And records show that contrary to popular myth,
      > Gutenberg was neither a goldsmith nor a member of the guild, though he
      > was associated with the Mint through his social status.

      There are no secure evidence of who cut what in the G. shop. Maybe
      both G. and Schoeffer cut punches. Made some minor research:

      Because of political conflicts in Mainz G. was forced to leave for
      Strassburg (1428-30) where the family had old connections. His
      official profession at the time was goldsmith, he had pupils learning
      how to cut precious stones. G. had a company with secret work, but
      typographical for sure, he held "chases and all kind of tools" (i.e.
      metal types). He paid a turner for making a printing press and
      employed a goldsmith who made "what goes with the printing" ("das zu
      dem trucken gehoeret"). These facts rest on lawsuit documents. No
      prints has been found or can be attributed to G. from his stay here.
      G. returns to Mainz 1448. His prospective cooperator Schoeffer is
      still working as calligrapher at Sorbonne university (1449) according
      to Kapr. In 1456 was Schoeffer involved in the production of the 42-
      lined bible. We'll find the most delicate textura in Psalterium which
      we ought to give him credit for.

      Per
    • Gerald Lange
      Per I cut off the last of my post to you by mistake. I think the date of Schöffer s entry into the project is fairly accurate primarily because somewhere was
      Message 51 of 51 , Apr 1, 2006
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        Per

        I cut off the last of my post to you by mistake. I think the date of
        Schöffer's entry into the project is fairly accurate primarily because
        somewhere was a reference to his being in Mainz prior to the fall of
        Constantinople (1493), which was of considerable concern to the
        European community.

        Gerald
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