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How to print a Tint Block?

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  • unisonletterpress
    Hello! This being my first post, I was wondering if anyone could give some advice on printing a tint? im printing some tickets, and on the backside of the
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 9, 2006
      Hello! This being my first post, I was wondering if anyone could give
      some advice on printing a tint? im printing some tickets, and on the
      backside of the tickets I want it in a solid green. I'll be using a
      Vandercook SP-15 with probably rubber based ink. I tried using
      linoleum block to do it, but I ended up with splotchy results. I added
      quite a bit of packing as well. Any idea what im doing wrong? Or what
      I should be doing? Thanks!
      Ryan
    • John Cornelisse
      ... Ryan, you can use a solid piece of photo-polymere plate, just cut it more than the size you need, no negative needed, just put enough light on it to harden
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 9, 2006
        At 05:49 10-3-06, you wrote:
        >Hello! This being my first post, I was wondering if anyone could give
        >some advice on printing a tint? im printing some tickets, and on the
        >backside of the tickets I want it in a solid green. I'll be using a
        >Vandercook SP-15 with probably rubber based ink. I tried using
        >linoleum block to do it, but I ended up with splotchy results. I added
        >quite a bit of packing as well. Any idea what im doing wrong? Or what
        >I should be doing? Thanks!
        >Ryan

        Ryan,

        you can use a solid piece of photo-polymere plate,
        just cut it more than the size you need,
        no negative needed, just put enough light on it
        to harden it completely, you do not need to wash it,
        just mount it on a base.

        If your paper is large enough, just print so that the
        edges are free, than the cylinder will stay clean. and
        cut the paper later.

        Photopolymere material is flat, and will print without any grain.

        Printing with no grain using linoleum ?
        you just need a lot of ink and a load of pressure too.

        Best wishes

        John Cornelisse


        Letter-press & Typefounding, Monotype-composition

        Vaartstraat 23
        4553 AN Philippine
        (Zeeuws Vlaanderen)
        The Netherlands

        + 31 - (0) 115 - 491184
        email: enkidu@...

        So she spoke to him and her word found favour,
        he knew by instinct, he should seek a friend.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Gerald Lange
        Ryan My guess, simply based on teaching experience, is that often mounted linoleum is not type high (most students don t realize this—don t know if you do or
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 10, 2006
          Ryan

          My guess, simply based on teaching experience, is that often mounted
          linoleum is not type high (most students don't realize this—don't know
          if you do or not). If this is not accounted for it won't really help
          much to overpack the cylinder to compensate. Cylinder presses are
          mechanically synced to print well at type high (.918), not higher nor
          lower. Usually printing a tint with linoleum is quite a simple matter.

          Gerald

          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "unisonletterpress"
          <mahdesign@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello! This being my first post, I was wondering if anyone could give
          > some advice on printing a tint? im printing some tickets, and on the
          > backside of the tickets I want it in a solid green. I'll be using a
          > Vandercook SP-15 with probably rubber based ink. I tried using
          > linoleum block to do it, but I ended up with splotchy results. I added
          > quite a bit of packing as well. Any idea what im doing wrong? Or what
          > I should be doing? Thanks!
          > Ryan
          >
        • Graham and Kathy
          Splotchy sounds to me like too much ink! Do you have a micrometer? You should measure your lino block to be evenly .925 high, and that will provide enough
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 10, 2006
            "Splotchy" sounds to me like too much ink!

            Do you have a micrometer? You should measure your lino block to be evenly
            .925 high, and that will provide enough pressure if your press is set to
            print type at .918.

            Timber that is planed to nominally one inch will work, but you will need to
            adjust your packing - and you might get interesting decoration from the
            wood grain!



            Graham Moss
            Incline Press
            36 Bow Street
            Oldham OL1 1SJ England
            http://www.inclinepress.com



            > At 05:49 10-3-06, you wrote:
            >> Hello! This being my first post, I was wondering if anyone could give
            >> some advice on printing a tint? im printing some tickets, and on the
            >> backside of the tickets I want it in a solid green. I'll be using a
            >> Vandercook SP-15 with probably rubber based ink. I tried using
            >> linoleum block to do it, but I ended up with splotchy results. I added
            >> quite a bit of packing as well. Any idea what im doing wrong? Or what
            >> I should be doing? Thanks!
            >> Ryan
          • Alan Brignull
            ... It helps to rub the lino down with fine sandpaper as well. Alan
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 10, 2006
              > Printing with no grain using linoleum ?
              > you just need a lot of ink and a load of pressure too.

              It helps to rub the lino down with fine sandpaper as well.


              Alan
            • John Cornelisse
              ... On a large area to be printed, the pressure = force/aera is lower than when you print just type, because the type represents less area... So here you might
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 10, 2006
                At 05:49 10-3-06, you wrote:
                >Hello! This being my first post, I was wondering if anyone could give
                >some advice on printing a tint? im printing some tickets, and on the
                >backside of the tickets I want it in a solid green. I'll be using a
                >Vandercook SP-15 with probably rubber based ink. I tried using
                >linoleum block to do it, but I ended up with splotchy results. I added
                >quite a bit of packing as well. Any idea what im doing wrong? Or what
                >I should be doing? Thanks!
                >Ryan

                On a large area to be printed, the pressure = force/aera
                is lower than when you print just type, because the type
                represents less area...

                So here you might need some adjustment to the makeready on the
                cylinder, or just add some paper under the block.

                I have seen very large area's printed on proofpresses
                up to 45 cm by 60 cm, than the force needed to print a solid
                is quite high even to get the cylinder over the block.

                The inking had to be done manually.

                Vinyl can be used for printing too, and can be obtained in
                some very smooth qualities. It is a little bit softer than
                linoleum, but takes the ink very good and prints nice.

                Best wishes

                John Cornelisse



                Letter-press & Typefounding, Monotype-composition

                Vaartstraat 23
                4553 AN Philippine
                (Zeeuws Vlaanderen)
                The Netherlands

                + 31 - (0) 115 - 491184
                email: enkidu@...

                So she spoke to him and her word found favour,
                he knew by instinct, he should seek a friend.


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Casey
                Ryan, I print from Linoleum, I do a lot of linocuts and also print with them and use type. One thing about covering large areas of surface with ink is it
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 10, 2006
                  Ryan,

                  I print from Linoleum, I do a lot of linocuts and also print with them
                  and use type.

                  One thing about covering large areas of surface with ink is it should
                  be hand rolled on so you get the best ink coverage. If you load up the
                  ink distribution with that much ink it'll plug up all your type.
                  Printing ink on linoleum from the ink carriage the print is somewhat
                  distressed or in other words it has been starved of ink.

                  You can use transparent white to thin down your ink to get a lint, it
                  works well, start with Transparent white and then add your color ink.

                  Tickets are pretty small and you should get good coverage, but the is
                  a fine line of adding to much and the type is plugged up.

                  Be careful about the packing, to much underneath the linoleum block
                  and it exceeded type high. Too much on the drum and you smash the type
                  and linoleum block.

                  Hope this helps,


                  Thanks for stopping by,

                  Casey McGarr
                  http://www.inkylipspress.com
                • unisonletterpress
                  Wow Thanks for everyones reply! That was a great help! im going to give it a shot this week and see what happens. Thanks again!
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 10, 2006
                    Wow Thanks for everyones reply! That was a great help! im going to
                    give it a shot this week and see what happens. Thanks again!

                    --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Alan Brignull <alanb@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > Printing with no grain using linoleum ?
                    > > you just need a lot of ink and a load of pressure too.
                    >
                    > It helps to rub the lino down with fine sandpaper as well.
                    >
                    >
                    > Alan
                    >
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