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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink question -- Transparent white

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  • Harold Kyle
    Could you explain this phenomenon, Gerald? I¹m not sure I follow. Thanks, Harold ... Boxcar Press Fine Printing / Digital Letterpress Supplies Delavan Center
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 19, 2006
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      Could you explain this phenomenon, Gerald? I¹m not sure I follow.

      Thanks,
      Harold


      On 2/18/06 3:25 AM, "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...> wrote:

      > Transparents or tint bases seem to require less makeready but they
      > have a problem with (added) pigment travel.


      Boxcar Press
      Fine Printing / Digital Letterpress Supplies
      Delavan Center / 501 W. Fayette St. / Studio 222 / Syracuse, NY 13204
      315-473-0930 phone / 315-473-0967 fax / www.boxcarpress.com



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gerald Lange
      Harold This can be filed under the usual suspicions and superstitions header, but I ll give it a go. . . As alex correctly pointed out transparent colors have
      Message 2 of 14 , Feb 19, 2006
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        Harold

        This can be filed under the usual suspicions and superstitions header,
        but I'll give it a go. . .

        As alex correctly pointed out transparent colors have less brightness.
        This is the result (obviously) of their being transparent, thus allowing
        paper color to contribute to the result, but also because they are
        pigment deficit. There is far too much variation in the pigment to
        carrier ratio. To compensate, colored transparent inks need have a high
        viscosity, thin film laydown, reduced roller pressure, and constant and
        measured recharging (as the color will change over repeated impression).
        If the inking configuration is off, pigment will travel and vividly form
        shadows or halos on the printing surface from the directional push of
        the rollers.

        Because of this (as I mentioned in the referral post) pigment travel in
        colored transparent inks poses a considerable problem with type but less
        so with images. Type is read, images are seen. The intellectual process
        of deciphering one or the other is different, and in terms of images,
        far less discerning. Glyphs are distinct code symbols, they don't even
        need to be seen to be read (the blind can read). In terms of printing,
        clarity in the reproduction of letterforms is to be strived for, if for
        no other reason (craft considerations aside) than that it improves
        legibility and thus readability.

        Transparent colors, however, require less makeready adjustments as there
        is no surface opacity to maintain (only uniform color throughout
        impression). The eye can less discern inconsistencies. To some extent
        this is illusional, but then, manipulated perception is at the heart of
        what printing is.

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

        Harold Kyle wrote:

        >Could you explain this phenomenon, Gerald? I¹m not sure I follow.
        >
        >Thanks,
        >Harold
        >
        >
        >On 2/18/06 3:25 AM, "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >>Transparents or tint bases seem to require less makeready but they
        >>have a problem with (added) pigment travel.
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        >Boxcar Press
        >Fine Printing / Digital Letterpress Supplies
        >Delavan Center / 501 W. Fayette St. / Studio 222 / Syracuse, NY 13204
        >315-473-0930 phone / 315-473-0967 fax / www.boxcarpress.com
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Harold Kyle
        I see what you¹re saying, Gerald. We use transparent base in our (commercial) shop almost exclusively so that we can accurately color match Pantone numbers in
        Message 3 of 14 , Feb 19, 2006
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          I see what you¹re saying, Gerald.

          We use transparent base in our (commercial) shop almost exclusively so that
          we can accurately color match Pantone numbers in our printing. You¹re
          absolutely right that the inking configuration is critical. To carry this
          further, when the inking is right, transparent-base inks do print crisply.
          The thin film laydown and low roller pressure seem to me to be critical
          whether we¹re printing black or we¹re printing a very transparent color. Of
          course, we¹re also printing with a deep impression...

          Since transparent white has a yellow ³cast² to it and opaque white has a
          ³blue² cast, we¹ve found mixing Pantone colors with opaque white to be to
          erratic, especially on very light colors.

          Harold



          On 2/19/06 5:11 PM, "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...> wrote:

          > If the inking configuration is off,


          Boxcar Press
          Fine Printing / Digital Letterpress Supplies
          Delavan Center / 501 W. Fayette St. / Studio 222 / Syracuse, NY 13204
          315-473-0930 phone / 315-473-0967 fax / www.boxcarpress.com



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David Michael McNamara
          I wanted to belatedly thank everyone who added to this discussion and addressed my question. I ve been out of town the past couple of days, and probably should
          Message 4 of 14 , Feb 20, 2006
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            I wanted to belatedly thank everyone who added to this discussion and addressed my question. I've been out of town the past couple of days, and probably should have said thanks before I left, but...better late than never still holds true, no?

            Anyway, thanks for the insights.
            __

            David
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Harold Kyle
            To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, February 19, 2006 9:17 PM
            Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Ink question -- Transparent white


            I see what you¹re saying, Gerald.

            We use transparent base in our (commercial) shop almost exclusively so that
            we can accurately color match Pantone numbers in our printing. You¹re
            absolutely right that the inking configuration is critical. To carry this
            further, when the inking is right, transparent-base inks do print crisply.
            The thin film laydown and low roller pressure seem to me to be critical
            whether we¹re printing black or we¹re printing a very transparent color. Of
            course, we¹re also printing with a deep impression...

            Since transparent white has a yellow ³cast² to it and opaque white has a
            ³blue² cast, we¹ve found mixing Pantone colors with opaque white to be to
            erratic, especially on very light colors.

            Harold



            On 2/19/06 5:11 PM, "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...> wrote:

            > If the inking configuration is off,


            Boxcar Press
            Fine Printing / Digital Letterpress Supplies
            Delavan Center / 501 W. Fayette St. / Studio 222 / Syracuse, NY 13204
            315-473-0930 phone / 315-473-0967 fax / www.boxcarpress.com



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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