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Re: Wet run vs/ Dry run.

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  • Gerald Lange
    Adrienne Most handmades and heavier mouldmades do require dampening or they will print grayish. I will print dry as often as I am able but for the most part I
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 27, 2006
      Adrienne

      Most handmades and heavier mouldmades do require dampening or they
      will print grayish. I will print dry as often as I am able but for the
      most part I do dampen the paper.

      Dampen is the keyword here, not wet. Properly dampened paper actually
      allows for better travel of the ink into the fibers. Too damp, and it
      rejects the ink.

      The print quality with dampened paper is quite superb, less ink is
      required, there is less wear to the printing surface, etc. But it does
      slow down the printing process considerably.

      If you click on Messages here and do a search you will find much more
      information on this as it has been discussed at length. The book
      Printing with the Handpress (available through Abe.com) discusses the
      process fairly well.

      Printing on a Vandercook is more akin to printmaking than printing on
      a press such as a Heidelberg or C&P. And many of the practices of
      printmaking are rightly followed in this regard.

      Gerald Lange
      The Bieler Press
      http://BielerPress.blogspot.com




      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "identifiabledesign"
      <adrienneberry@i...> wrote:
      >
      > I am an amature letterpresser and has a question about process. I
      have only done dry runs on
      > the press, however I recently heard that some people wet their paper
      (like printmaking)
      > before running it. is this common? If so, what is the difference in
      print quality and how does
      > the oil ink adhere to the wet paper?
      >
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