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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Plates for H/Berg Cylinder

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  • Gerald Lange
    Dear Dan The Bunting Bases come in a lot of weird sizes. The reason for this is that Bunting has configured the sizing to fit, in combination, the various
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 5 12:27 AM
      Dear Dan

      The Bunting Bases come in a lot of weird sizes. The reason for this is that
      Bunting has configured the sizing to fit, in combination, the various chase
      sizes of the major presses: C & P, Heidelberg, B & K, Miehle, New Era. Most of
      the newer letterpress manufacturers (European) are running cylinder-shaped
      magnetic bases, which Bunting also supplies.

      Yes, while the magnetism of a Bunting is extremely strong, you can still
      experience plate travel on a Heidleberg, especially with large solids of the
      kind that you are running. Bunting provides bases with optional pin
      registration and scribelines. I suspect most of the commerecial outfits would
      buy these, but most folks running out of a studio might not want the added
      expense to what is already a considerable expense. A cheap run around is a
      butt bar, locked in with the base which prevents the plate from traveling.

      All best

      Gerald


      The Indian Hill Press wrote:
      >

      >
      > Could you describe in detail this "chase fitting"? And do you think
      > Bunting would have a sufficiently strong magnet to make spray
      > adhesive unnecessary?
      >
      > Dan Waters
      > Indian Hill Press
      >
    • Gaylord Schanilec
      Jerry. I too had the creeping problem with a bunting base on the KSBA. I wonder what Brad Hutchenson uses. Gaylor.d
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 5 7:37 AM
        Jerry. I too had the creeping problem with a bunting base on the KSBA. I
        wonder what Brad Hutchenson uses. Gaylor.d

        The Indian Hill Press wrote:

        > Dear Gerald:
        >
        > In your reply to Wayne, you mention that you just sold a chase
        > fitting of Buntings for a KSBA.
        >
        > We run our KSBA all the time, but I've been leery of using polymer
        > because of plate creep. (We use polymer frequently, but only on the
        > Windmill.)
        >
        > Could you describe in detail this "chase fitting"? And do you think
        > Bunting would have a sufficiently strong magnet to make spray
        > adhesive unnecessary?
        >
        > Dan Waters
        > Indian Hill Press
        >
        > >Hi Wayne
        > >
        > >This URL has been in the Bookmarks section since the list went up.
        > >Quite useful but you do have to ignore the flexo stuff. Some folks
        > >don't know there is a difference. "Back-exposure" is my favorite.
        > >
        > >I'd say your specs below are about right. .060 (not much shallower
        > >than that) for the Heidelberg with a deep relief of about .048 to
        > >prevent ink runoff. On a Vandercook I run .037-.038 at .026 depth.
        > >Fairly hard durometer for what you want to do. But the different
        > >manufacturers' plates do matter. Stick with BASF (nyloprint) or
        > >Toyobo (Printight) or Jet. There is some cheap junk out on the
        > >market. Steelbacked if you go with magnetic bases. On a Heidelberg
        > >I'd say get Buntings to prevent plate travel. (I'm sure Kyle will
        > >disagree.) Just sold a chase fitting of Buntings for the exact same
        > >model! 17+ by 21+ right?
        > >
        > >URLs for these are in Bookmarks and listings in the Database.
        > >
        > >Gerald
        >
        >
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