Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [PPLetterpress] Lead, toxic metal

Expand Messages
  • T Howard
    Hi Lola, I hope the reassurance from these experienced people relieves your husband s worries. I m a newcomer to letterpress myself, and have grown to trust
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 10, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Lola,
      I hope the reassurance from these experienced people relieves your husband's worries. I'm a newcomer to letterpress myself, and have grown to trust those who spend their time educating us all. I believe them when they say there's no danger if one uses due care, and the apparent longevity of printers in history seems to bear this out. :-)

      But as a mother, I'd say do what it takes to help you and your husband feel confident
      and happy. Often it's not the real dangers, but our internal fears (not always, or even usually, reality based) that cause us the most distress as parents. If you like, perhaps wear gloves and a dust mask while setting type during your pregnacy and nursing, to relieve any residual concerns. It won't hurt anything to do so, and will give you both peace of mind.

      And peace of mind, along with compassion for each other's worries, are the single most important ingredients young parents need for a healthy child. :-)

      Tina

      John Cornelisse <enkidu@...> wrote:
      At 11:30 10-1-06, you wrote:
      >After handling type wash your hands before sucking your fingers,

      >don't melt the type and stand over the pot breathing the fumes,

      There's some fairy-tail about "Lead-fumes"

      Molten lead is about 270-360 degrees Celcius, and that's far, far
      from the boiling-point

      Therefore those famous "lead-fumes" they do not contain metal in any
      measurable proportion at all.

      If there are fumes at all, those come from burning ink, burning oil
      and other impurities.

      >and, most importantly, don't eat any of the type.

      Who will ever do that ?

      DO NOT EAT WHILE HANDLING TYPE,
      clean your hands afterwards

      That will do.

      Do not smoke sigarettes,

      that smoke contains more heavy metals than you can imagine: cadmium
      for instance.

      Healthy printing !


      Best wishes

      John Cornelisse


      Letter-press & Typefounding, Monotype-composition

      Vaartstraat 23
      4553 AN Philippine
      (Zeeuws Vlaanderen)
      The Netherlands

      + 31 - (0) 115 - 491184
      email: enkidu@...

      So she spoke to him and her word found favour,
      he knew by instinct, he should seek a friend.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




      Yahoo! Groups Links










      ---------------------------------
      Yahoo! Photos
      Ring in the New Year with Photo Calendars. Add photos, events, holidays, whatever.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gerald Lange
      Scott Back in 1991 I had a spectrographic chemical semi-quantitative analysis run of a well known Monotype foundry s metal (because of an editorial dispute)
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 10, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Scott

        Back in 1991 I had a "spectrographic chemical semi-quantitative
        analysis" run of a well known Monotype foundry's metal (because of an
        editorial dispute) and it came out 64.33 lead, 27 antimony, 8.1 tin,
        .34 copper, .15 arsenic and .08 with traces of bismuth, silver,
        nickel, calcium, iron and magnesium (see AbraCadaBrA #6, Special
        Suspicions and Superstitions Issue).

        Type metal that is recycled is not often clean (copper and antimony,
        unlike tin, don't leach out). The arsenic is lead arsenate that is
        formed as the result of both elements being present during the
        smelting process. Not actually all that uncommon. It is used as a
        hardening agent in foundry type. Particularly in Asia. All that Asian
        metal type you see offered on eBay; don't buy it.

        If one washes their hands after using metal type there is not much
        danger. Probably more danger in the dirt that has accumulated on old
        type and the occasional rodent excretion (they do like those sort
        condos).

        Far worse is type that has corroded and has white fuzz or staining on
        its surface. This is a form of lead oxide and that you do not want in
        your shop (it can lead to lead poisoning if ingested). This is usually
        caused by acidic reaction. Prolonged dampness in a wood floor type
        case, sea water contamination, chamber lye (urine), and cigarette ash.
        Seen em all!

        Gerald

        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Scott Rubel <scott@i...> wrote:
        >
        > Indeed, the type is not dangerous, and is only 64% lead (23.88%
        > antimony, and 12.02% tin, with traces of copper) though I do know
        people
        > who use prophylactic gloves while handling it. Ick.
      • Scott Rubel
        The white fuzz? Listening to Gerald, I m doomed. It s excreting from the concrete and stone walls, too, and on the joints of the faucets. The windows are
        Message 3 of 14 , Jan 10, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          The white fuzz? Listening to Gerald, I'm doomed. It's excreting from
          the concrete and stone walls, too, and on the joints of the faucets.
          The windows are cloudy and the spiders are clumsy with their webs. I
          keep wood indoors to feed the stove and it has some sort of yellow
          fuzz by the time I get around to feeding it to the flames. The room
          smokes up and the people upstairs complain loudly. Rust forms on my
          tweezers and my eyeglass frames. There are holes and tunnels shooting
          through all my souvenir paper projects I keep in my archives, even
          though I use archival papers. Termite dust falls on my Vandercook
          every time the noon bell rings. American Type foundries are gone, but
          I still refuse to buy Asian anything because they took over the gauge
          pin business and they do it amazingly badly. Anyone who doesn't take
          the time for bluing and heat-treating steel should be discounted
          summarily.

          Bad printing night. Bad mood and toxic exposure, too.

          The white fuzz? I'm doomed.

          --Scott

          On Jan 10, 2006, at 9:26 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

          > Scott
          >
          > Back in 1991 I had a "spectrographic chemical semi-quantitative
          > analysis" run of a well known Monotype foundry's metal (because of an
          > editorial dispute) and it came out 64.33 lead, 27 antimony, 8.1 tin,
          > .34 copper, .15 arsenic and .08 with traces of bismuth, silver,
          > nickel, calcium, iron and magnesium (see AbraCadaBrA #6, Special
          > Suspicions and Superstitions Issue).
          >
          > Type metal that is recycled is not often clean (copper and antimony,
          > unlike tin, don't leach out). The arsenic is lead arsenate that is
          > formed as the result of both elements being present during the
          > smelting process. Not actually all that uncommon. It is used as a
          > hardening agent in foundry type. Particularly in Asia. All that Asian
          > metal type you see offered on eBay; don't buy it.
          >
          > If one washes their hands after using metal type there is not much
          > danger. Probably more danger in the dirt that has accumulated on old
          > type and the occasional rodent excretion (they do like those sort
          > condos).
          >
          > Far worse is type that has corroded and has white fuzz or staining on
          > its surface. This is a form of lead oxide and that you do not want in
          > your shop (it can lead to lead poisoning if ingested). This is usually
          > caused by acidic reaction. Prolonged dampness in a wood floor type
          > case, sea water contamination, chamber lye (urine), and cigarette ash.
          > Seen em all!
          >
          > Gerald
          >
          > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Scott Rubel <scott@i...> wrote:
          >>
          >> Indeed, the type is not dangerous, and is only 64% lead (23.88%
          >> antimony, and 12.02% tin, with traces of copper) though I do know
          > people
          >> who use prophylactic gloves while handling it. Ick.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >

          --Scott Rubel

          Come gather 'round people
          Wherever you roam
          And admit that the waters
          Around you have grown
          And accept it that soon
          You'll be drenched to the bone.
          If your time to you
          Is worth savin'
          Then you better start swimmin'
          Or you'll sink like a stone
          For the times they are a-changin'. --B. Dylan
        • Gerald Lange
          Scott Sounds like you are doomed. And yet there are so many far worse concerns in life. Gerald
          Message 4 of 14 , Jan 10, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Scott

            Sounds like you are doomed. And yet there are so many far worse
            concerns in life.

            Gerald

            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Scott Rubel <scott@i...> wrote:
            >
            > The white fuzz? Listening to Gerald, I'm doomed. It's excreting from
            > the concrete and stone walls, too, and on the joints of the faucets.
            > The windows are cloudy and the spiders are clumsy with their webs. I
            > keep wood indoors to feed the stove and it has some sort of yellow
            > fuzz by the time I get around to feeding it to the flames. The room
            > smokes up and the people upstairs complain loudly. Rust forms on my
            > tweezers and my eyeglass frames. There are holes and tunnels shooting
            > through all my souvenir paper projects I keep in my archives, even
            > though I use archival papers. Termite dust falls on my Vandercook
            > every time the noon bell rings. American Type foundries are gone, but
            > I still refuse to buy Asian anything because they took over the gauge
            > pin business and they do it amazingly badly. Anyone who doesn't take
            > the time for bluing and heat-treating steel should be discounted
            > summarily.
            >
            > Bad printing night. Bad mood and toxic exposure, too.
            >
            > The white fuzz? I'm doomed.
            >
            > --Scott
            >
            > On Jan 10, 2006, at 9:26 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
            >
            > > Scott
            > >
            > > Back in 1991 I had a "spectrographic chemical semi-quantitative
            > > analysis" run of a well known Monotype foundry's metal (because of an
            > > editorial dispute) and it came out 64.33 lead, 27 antimony, 8.1 tin,
            > > .34 copper, .15 arsenic and .08 with traces of bismuth, silver,
            > > nickel, calcium, iron and magnesium (see AbraCadaBrA #6, Special
            > > Suspicions and Superstitions Issue).
            > >
            > > Type metal that is recycled is not often clean (copper and antimony,
            > > unlike tin, don't leach out). The arsenic is lead arsenate that is
            > > formed as the result of both elements being present during the
            > > smelting process. Not actually all that uncommon. It is used as a
            > > hardening agent in foundry type. Particularly in Asia. All that Asian
            > > metal type you see offered on eBay; don't buy it.
            > >
            > > If one washes their hands after using metal type there is not much
            > > danger. Probably more danger in the dirt that has accumulated on old
            > > type and the occasional rodent excretion (they do like those sort
            > > condos).
            > >
            > > Far worse is type that has corroded and has white fuzz or staining on
            > > its surface. This is a form of lead oxide and that you do not want in
            > > your shop (it can lead to lead poisoning if ingested). This is usually
            > > caused by acidic reaction. Prolonged dampness in a wood floor type
            > > case, sea water contamination, chamber lye (urine), and cigarette ash.
            > > Seen em all!
            > >
            > > Gerald
            > >
            > > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Scott Rubel <scott@i...> wrote:
            > >>
            > >> Indeed, the type is not dangerous, and is only 64% lead (23.88%
            > >> antimony, and 12.02% tin, with traces of copper) though I do know
            > > people
            > >> who use prophylactic gloves while handling it. Ick.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            > --Scott Rubel
            >
            > Come gather 'round people
            > Wherever you roam
            > And admit that the waters
            > Around you have grown
            > And accept it that soon
            > You'll be drenched to the bone.
            > If your time to you
            > Is worth savin'
            > Then you better start swimmin'
            > Or you'll sink like a stone
            > For the times they are a-changin'. --B. Dylan
            >
          • John Cornelisse
            ... Steve, the leadpaint eaten by children, is to be understand moore easily, when you know the taste of those chips: those lead-carbonate chips are quite
            Message 5 of 14 , Jan 11, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              At 12:16 11-1-06, you wrote:
              >Whoops. Bad math. Franklin was 84 when he died, not
              >87...but for that day and age, 84 was like an
              >eternity!
              >
              >Best wishes,
              >
              >--Steve

              Steve,

              the leadpaint eaten by children, is to be understand moore easily, when you
              know the taste of those chips:

              those lead-carbonate chips are quite sweet, like sugar

              there are a lot more chemicals that taste sweet: like NaOH and KOH (lye)

              Best wishes

              John Cornelisse


              Letter-press & Typefounding, Monotype-composition

              Vaartstraat 23
              4553 AN Philippine
              (Zeeuws Vlaanderen)
              The Netherlands

              + 31 - (0) 115 - 491184
              email: enkidu@...

              So she spoke to him and her word found favour,
              he knew by instinct, he should seek a friend.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Steve Robison
              To All... Re: Lead and stuff... When this thread started, it was a good simple question from Lola Espinosa about the safety of an unborn child by an expectant
              Message 6 of 14 , Jan 11, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                To All...

                Re: Lead and stuff...

                When this thread started, it was a good simple
                question from Lola Espinosa about the safety of an
                unborn child by an expectant mother.

                I hope, by some measure, Lola's main concerns have
                been addressed through Graham Moss¡¦ practical advice,
                John Cornelisse¡¦s demystification of fairytale lead
                fumes, Tina Howard¡¦s suggestions to do what¡¦s
                necessary to give peace of mind, Kathy Walkup¡¦s
                experience with raising children while printing and
                cautions about solvents, Scott Rubel¡¦s technical
                analysis and final adage that, ¡§we¡¦re not doctors,
                and probably don¡¦t even play one on T.V.,¡¨ and
                Gerald Lange¡¦s extensive experience and technical
                advice.

                So what can I add, if anything, to what¡¦s already
                been said?
                I¡¦m not sure, but just like all letterpress printers
                that I know, I¡¦m going to give it try. If I¡¦m
                redundant, so be it. I just want to help Lola reach
                both a reasoned and emotionally satisfactory
                decision¡Kone that can reassure her of her future
                child¡¦s safety and health, and one with which she and
                her husband can be comfortable. And of course, one
                which will still allow Lola to print safely!

                Federal noticing laws have helped condition us to be
                wary of the possibility of lead poisoning because of
                the damage it can inflict if ingested by young
                children. Since we all handle lead alloy type in our
                letterpress hobby or profession, it is no wonder why
                this is and has been such a "hot topic" on all the
                letterpress lists, and it should be. Safety in any
                shop should be the highest priority to the occupants.
                And adding to our collective wisdom on topics of
                safety can do nothing else but educate more of us to
                live longer in our letterpress profession or
                avocation. So just for kicks (and for safety too) I
                thought I'd get in the fray and add my 2 picas worth.

                By the way, if you want the scoop on the risks of lead
                poisoning from causes other than letterpress, go to
                this site put out by the Mayo Clinic. It's very
                informative and helps give perspective:

                http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/lead-poisoning/FL00068

                Now for the points I want to make:

                Point #1:
                The most significant thing I can say about letterpress
                lead toxicity is that Louis at the M&H Type Foundry in
                San Francisco has been casting type there for 8 hours
                a day, 7 days a week for over 50 years. I think he's
                well into his 70's now, and he is still casting type
                there. As a precaution, he gets tested for lead in his
                system regularly. Interestingly enough, not only is he
                very fit for his age, but he also has lead levels at
                or below the levels found in the general
                population...and yet he handles thousands of pounds of
                lead in heated and cooled forms all day long and has
                done so for over 50 years.

                What's his secret? He handles mostly NEW type that is
                not oxidized, and he washes his hands before he eats
                lunch.
                That's it. That's his secret. If we all do the same,
                we shouldn't have any problems. Oh, and don't have
                your child licking lead alloy chips and dust off the
                floor, or eating sorts of Bodoni for mid-morning
                snacks.

                Point#2:
                Lead exists in high concentrations in our external
                environment as well. It doesn¡¦t make it right or safe
                or anything else. But know that lead is ¡§everywhere¡¨
                outside of our shops too. Until relatively recently,
                lead was used in gasoline. As these fossil fuels have
                been burned in bazillions of cars over the last 100+
                years, the lead particles have risen with the hot
                exhaust gases and then fallen to the Earth¡¦s surface
                as these hot gases cooled, contaminating our water and
                land. Until relatively recently, metal water pipes
                were also all soldered with lead solder that allows
                the lead to slowly leach into our drinking water,
                which is not good for those who risk drinking out of
                the tap. And we all know about the dangers of lead
                paint in old homes. These are but a few of the ways we
                ¡§live¡¨ with lead that are totally out of our
                personal control. But in our letterpress shops, we can
                be fairly pro-active in protecting these specific
                indoor environments.

                So let's put things in perspective. Controls and bans
                on all of these practices have lowered the lead
                toxicity in the general environment, but not all the
                lead is gone. Lead in our environment will most likely
                be there for some time to come and in more toxic forms
                than will ever be present in most of our letterpress
                shops. However, how we deal with the clean-up of these
                environmental lead toxins in the external environment
                should give us some clues about how we can further
                minimize lead risk in our shops.

                Some examples:

                Lead occurs in the paint of older homes (pre 1978, and
                particularly pre 1950) and we should all be concerned
                about young children ingesting lead paint chips or
                ingesting the powdered oxidation from lead paint that
                may fall to the floor and accumulate over decades and
                be present in older homes. Ingestion of lead in these
                forms is easy for children because young children
                crawl around on the floor where this stuff can
                accumulate and they put odd stuff into their mouths
                all the time. Large quantities of lead ingested in
                this way might subsequently cause serious nervous
                system damage. What can we do to minimize this risk?
                We can paint over the old paint and "encapsulate" it
                so that there are no loose chips or powdery oxidation
                that children can easily ingest. We can take a moist
                rag or mop and wipe up any powdery dust from lead
                based paints. In other words, we can take some
                common-sense precautions.

                As most of us know, adults are not at risk of lead
                poisoning as much as children. This is so because lead
                affects and slows down the development of the brain
                and nervous system and most affects children as their
                brains, physical structure and nervous system is
                developing and growing. Theoretically our adult brains
                and nervous systems are already fully developed and
                more resistant to damage from lead toxicity -- but
                certainly adults can be negatively affected too,
                especially if they ingest large amounts of lead. But
                hopefully adults don't go around eating paint chips,
                ingesting lead paint dust, or are caught chowing down
                on some old fonts of futura.

                But if your hobby happens to be soldering stain glass
                frames, or working with lead based jewelry, you might
                be at greater risk. Same goes with letterpress
                printing.

                As has been said, the real villain in the letterpress
                shop is lead oxide and the real bad news would be the
                ingestion of lead oxide. Lead oxide is the white
                powdery substance on old corroded type. I believe this
                was called "white lead" in days gone by, and used in
                the paint of some of the famous master oil painters.
                Their lead poisoning came from licking their paint
                brushes to sharpen the point of the brush. Some of us
                still have some of this kind of corroded type laying
                around in long forgotten places in our shops. It would
                be good to take precautions with it.

                As has been said before, just don't eat it, suck on
                it, lick it or breathe it and you should be fine. Nice
                clean newer type is not a risk as long as it is not
                eaten. It's the old, corroded white powdered "lead
                oxide" type that is the greatest concern. The white
                powder or "fuzz" as Gerald called it is lead oxide,
                and in this powdered form it can brush off the type
                onto the bottom of cases, accumulate on a shop floor
                over decades, be breathed into one's lungs, and get
                into places that lead type in it's solid shiny form
                can't.


                The answer to lead oxide is to clean it up, either by
                encapsulating it or moistening it by soaking all the
                corroded type in strong solvent to either remove the
                oxide or keep the oxide dust from flying around. Or,
                as some suggest, remove the oxide in a lye bath (which
                is a venture into toxics all by itself.)

                Point #3

                A week from now, on January 17, 2006 some of us will
                be celebrating the patron saint of American Printing
                in honoring the 300th anniversary of the birth of
                Benjamin Franklin. Now no one can say for sure what
                helped carry him to the ripe old age of 87, but if one
                thing is certain, he kept his hand in letterpress
                printing on and off for most of his life, and lived to
                be one of the longest surviving colonial leaders. Now
                this is anecdotal evidence to be sure, but hey, why
                not offer it as a way to say lead type couldn¡¦t have
                been much of a factor in his death, unless he might
                have lived to be 110 had he not been a printer!
                (Perhaps he just washed his hands before eating, and
                didn¡¦t lick his type ƒº)

                In any case, I hope we have all helped answer your
                question Lola, and good luck with your ultimate
                decision on what to do.

                Best wishes,

                --Steve

                Steve Robison
                Robison Press
                Belmont, CA


                --- Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:

                > Scott
                >
                > Sounds like you are doomed. And yet there are so
                > many far worse
                > concerns in life.
                >
                > Gerald


                Steve Robison
                Belmont, CA
                robisonsteve@...

                __________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                http://mail.yahoo.com
              • Steve Robison
                Whoops. Bad math. Franklin was 84 when he died, not 87...but for that day and age, 84 was like an eternity! Best wishes, --Steve ... Steve Robison Belmont, CA
                Message 7 of 14 , Jan 11, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Whoops. Bad math. Franklin was 84 when he died, not
                  87...but for that day and age, 84 was like an
                  eternity!

                  Best wishes,

                  --Steve

                  --- Steve Robison <robisonsteve@...> wrote:

                  > Point #3
                  >
                  > A week from now, on January 17, 2006 some of us will
                  > be celebrating the patron saint of American Printing
                  > in honoring the 300th anniversary of the birth of
                  > Benjamin Franklin. Now no one can say for sure what
                  > helped carry him to the ripe old age of 87, but if
                  > one
                  > thing is certain, he kept his hand in letterpress
                  > printing on and off for most of his life, and lived
                  > to
                  > be one of the longest surviving colonial leaders.
                  > Now
                  > this is anecdotal evidence to be sure, but hey, why
                  > not offer it as a way to say lead type couldn¡¦t
                  > have
                  > been much of a factor in his death, unless he might
                  > have lived to be 110 had he not been a printer!
                  > (Perhaps he just washed his hands before eating, and
                  > didn¡¦t lick his type ƒº)
                  >


                  Steve Robison
                  Belmont, CA
                  robisonsteve@...

                  __________________________________________________
                  Do You Yahoo!?
                  Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                  http://mail.yahoo.com
                • nagraph@frontier.net
                  If the reference is to Megill gauge pins, the last shipment we received looked fine, were blued, and a are lot better that what I ve seen for a couple of
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jan 12, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    If the reference is to Megill gauge pins, the last shipment we received looked
                    fine, were blued, and a are lot better that what I've seen for a couple of
                    years. And, supposedly, some of these are made in Mexico, though some have been
                    stamped Hong Kong in the past. I have samples of the steel used by Megil before
                    stamping and it is very mild/soft stuff, and even the poorly done ones were
                    heat treated, but not very well. I'm also presently at the Dale Guild Type
                    Foundry in New Jersey and everything in the building came from ATF and the 12
                    pt Bulmer that was being cast today is about as good as it gets
                    anywhere--beautiful type, so some of ATF's former glory of beautiful type is
                    still available.

                    Fritz

                    Quoting Scott Rubel <scott@...>:

                    American Type foundries are gone, but
                    > I still refuse to buy Asian anything because they took over the gauge
                    > pin business and they do it amazingly badly. Anyone who doesn't take
                    > the time for bluing and heat-treating steel should be discounted
                    > summarily.
                    >
                    > Bad printing night. Bad mood and toxic exposure, too.
                    >
                    > The white fuzz? I'm doomed.
                    >
                    > --Scott
                    >
                    > On Jan 10, 2006, at 9:26 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                    >
                    > > Scott
                    > >
                    > > Back in 1991 I had a "spectrographic chemical semi-quantitative
                    > > analysis" run of a well known Monotype foundry's metal (because of an
                    > > editorial dispute) and it came out 64.33 lead, 27 antimony, 8.1 tin,
                    > > .34 copper, .15 arsenic and .08 with traces of bismuth, silver,
                    > > nickel, calcium, iron and magnesium (see AbraCadaBrA #6, Special
                    > > Suspicions and Superstitions Issue).
                    > >
                    > > Type metal that is recycled is not often clean (copper and antimony,
                    > > unlike tin, don't leach out). The arsenic is lead arsenate that is
                    > > formed as the result of both elements being present during the
                    > > smelting process. Not actually all that uncommon. It is used as a
                    > > hardening agent in foundry type. Particularly in Asia. All that Asian
                    > > metal type you see offered on eBay; don't buy it.
                    > >
                    > > If one washes their hands after using metal type there is not much
                    > > danger. Probably more danger in the dirt that has accumulated on old
                    > > type and the occasional rodent excretion (they do like those sort
                    > > condos).
                    > >
                    > > Far worse is type that has corroded and has white fuzz or staining on
                    > > its surface. This is a form of lead oxide and that you do not want in
                    > > your shop (it can lead to lead poisoning if ingested). This is usually
                    > > caused by acidic reaction. Prolonged dampness in a wood floor type
                    > > case, sea water contamination, chamber lye (urine), and cigarette ash.
                    > > Seen em all!
                    > >
                    > > Gerald
                    > >
                    > > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Scott Rubel <scott@i...> wrote:
                    > >>
                    > >> Indeed, the type is not dangerous, and is only 64% lead (23.88%
                    > >> antimony, and 12.02% tin, with traces of copper) though I do know
                    > > people
                    > >> who use prophylactic gloves while handling it. Ick.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    > --Scott Rubel
                    >
                    > Come gather 'round people
                    > Wherever you roam
                    > And admit that the waters
                    > Around you have grown
                    > And accept it that soon
                    > You'll be drenched to the bone.
                    > If your time to you
                    > Is worth savin'
                    > Then you better start swimmin'
                    > Or you'll sink like a stone
                    > For the times they are a-changin'. --B. Dylan
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.