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Re: Paper dampening advice.

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  • Gerald Lange
    Danny The best information on dampening paper can probably be found in the books by Richard-Gabriel Rummonds, Printing on the Iron Handpress (which is in print
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 19, 2005
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      Danny

      The best information on dampening paper can probably be found in the
      books by Richard-Gabriel Rummonds, Printing on the
      Iron Handpress (which is in print and available from Oak Knoll), and
      Lewis Allen, Printing with the Handpress, which you can pick up online
      used. There are also a couple of fugitive articles by William Everson
      that deal with the theory of it. I follow the Allen method with a lot
      of the Everson infused into it. The damp boxes described in the Allen
      book are quite essential I've found (I've got six of em!!!). Rummonds
      and others have recommended plastic garbage bags for containing the
      heap (which likely work well) but the boxes actually provide a great
      deal of control over the hydration process.

      The Indian paper should respond well to dampening but I would not
      spritz it. That is not the most effective way. But then, neither is
      printing 10-pt type from magnesium plates. Here we go!!!!

      The most important thing would seem to keep the heap turning at
      regular intervals and to allow at least 12 to 24 hours for the sheets
      to properly hydrate. After which slow weighting will help to keep the
      paper from buckling (also post-printing). The thing is you have to let
      the paper adapt to its new environment (and that takes a bit of time).
      Even after it is put in a damp box it needs to adjust a bit; one can
      even maintain an extended hydration sequence with proper adjustment of
      the dampened sponge material in the box.

      Too much information, not enough? I've been printing damp for about 25
      years now, and rarely have any problems. But there are certain ways it
      does need to be done (to avoid problems).

      Better to under dampen than over dampen by the way,

      Gerald

      http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "dannyamosflynn"
      <dannyamosflynn@y...> wrote:
      >
      > I am about to attempt printing some 10pt type from a magnesium plate
      onto some quite
      > hard Indian Kahdi hand made card. I have never tried dampening the
      card before and
      > wondered what is the best way to do it. With a sponge? A spray?
      Does one leave it for a
      > length of time? Does it help?
      >
      > I have already had a dream of apprehension in which the card became
      a stack of twine
      > twisted doormats.
      >
      > Thanks
      > Danny Flynn
      >
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