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Greek Font Society Didot

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  • Gerald Lange
    The Greek Font Society has made its GFS Didot available as a free download http://www.greekfontsociety.org This is in OT format and comes with a PDF specimen.
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 26, 2005
      The Greek Font Society has made its GFS Didot available as a free download

      http://www.greekfontsociety.org

      This is in OT format and comes with a PDF specimen.

      Gerald
    • Ludwig M. Solzen
      Gerald Nice try, I d say. But it is completely incomprehensible why they choose Palatino as its Latin companion face. The vertical stress, the rhythm and
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 1, 2005
        Gerald

        Nice try, I'd say. But it is completely incomprehensible why they choose
        Palatino as its Latin companion face. The vertical stress, the rhythm and
        ductus of the didone typefaces are mutually exclusive with Zapf's
        neo-humanistic hand, which has a diagonal stress, resulting from the 35°
        slant of the broad pen. As regards the even typographical grey, these
        typefaces - using the term from Prof. Yannis Haralambous - are not
        'calibrated'.

        Also, I find little resemblances in this face with the Didot Greek that is
        in the Enschedé specimen of 1931, which shows the original founts of Jules
        and Pierre Didot. (Perhaps they used those by Firmin Didot as an example?)
        Anyhow, the less didonic traits, the better the face fits the Palatino
        companion.

        There are lots of much better Greek typefaces than this pitiable endeavour.
        Cautiously skipping the dangerous discussion on 'latinised' Greek typefaces
        (such as the ones by Eric Gill and Jan van Krimpen), I'd rather recommend
        the new Adobe Garamond Premier that has a complete Greek glyph set, quite
        loyal to the original 'Grecs du Roy' and delightfully handsome. And it ships
        also for free, with the Adobe apps, that is.

        For all those interested in Greek typography and in an overview of the most
        used Greek typefaces the article by Haralambous is really recommendable:
        Yannis Haralambous, Keeping Greek Typography Alive, s.l. 2002.
        ( http://omega.enstb.org/yannis/pdf/thessaloniki.pdf )

        This article is also eye-opining as regards those typographical qualities
        earlier discussed, amongst which hanging punctuation, kerning and even
        typographical grey &c &c. Really, do the effort!

        (Haralambous has devised some very striking Greek revivals as well,
        including some with old style ligatures and contractions, but the link to
        the type specimen seems alas to be broken.)

        Ludwig
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