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Plates for H/Berg Cylinder

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  • cutncrease
    Dear List, Just about to make a big plate purchase but I want to get it right. I m running a KSBA heidelberg with mixed formes (pics and text) and printing to
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 2, 2002
      Dear List,

      Just about to make a big plate purchase but I want to get it right. I'm running a KSBA heidelberg with mixed formes (pics and text) and printing to
      smooth uncoated stock. So I have a few key questions about what pp plates I should be using:

      Metal backed (aluminium) or Foil backed.

      What Height: .060?

      What Relief: .040?

      What Duro: 65-75?

      Are there any real differences between manufacturers products whose plates match spec.

      Any info really appreciated.

      Thanks,
      Wayne.
    • Katie Harper
      Hello! I ran into a former student last night who had just found a wonderful new book on printmaking with Solarplates (which I believe is a brand name?) He
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 2, 2002
        Hello!

        I ran into a former student last night who had just found a wonderful new
        book on printmaking with Solarplates (which I believe is a brand name?) He
        asked me if these plates, which are sold by Daniel Smith and other
        printmaking suppliers, were the same as the ones I use. I know they have a
        different color (decidedly greenish cast), but beyond that I have not used
        these plates for relief/letterpress work.

        Does anyone out there have any experience with Solarplate? Can it be used
        for letterpress, and if so, is it worthwhile in terms of quality and price?
        He will be doing everything by hand, by the way, and understands that the
        quality may suffer. He's using this primarily for experimental work.


        Katie Harper
        Ars Brevis Press
        Cincinnati, OH
        513-233-9588
      • Harold Kyle
        ... These are steel-backed pad printing/rotary letterpress plates. The greenish ones you saw are Toyobo brand, I believe. You might inform your student that I
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 2, 2002
          On 4/2/02 8:58 AM, "Katie Harper" <knharper@...> wrote:
          > Does anyone out there have any experience with Solarplate? Can it be used
          > for letterpress, and if so, is it worthwhile in terms of quality and price?

          These are steel-backed pad printing/rotary letterpress plates. The greenish
          ones you saw are Toyobo brand, I believe. You might inform your student that
          I sell the equivalent 0.017" Jet plate: $29 per A2 sheet (23.375x16.5) or
          $15 per A3 sheet (16.5x11.6875). Other thicknesses are also available.

          In general, intaglio printers prefer to use the thinnest plates
          available--frequently 0.017" thick (with 0.007" relief). Students at the
          university here use plates 0.029" thick (with 0.19" relief). These plates
          would not allow for much impression when printed letterpress and would be
          difficult to print on many types of paper. Letterpress printers generally
          opt for thicker plates, which allow more flexibility with impression and
          paper stock.

          Harold

          ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
          Boxcar Press
          Fine Printing and Binding ~ Digital Letterpress Supplies
          640 Fellows Avenue ~ Syracuse, NY 13210
          www.boxcarpress.com
          ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
        • Lee and Barbara Mason
          Katie, These are toray plates or similar and I know a letterpress commercial handprint place here in Portland Oregon that uses them...the store is called
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 2, 2002
            Katie,
            These are toray plates or similar and I know a letterpress commercial
            handprint place here in Portland Oregon that uses them...the store is called
            Oblation and the owner's name is Ron, so if you want info desperately you
            could call him and get his source for the plates. They do not have a backing
            on them, it is just the polymer he exposes and washes out. They do a lot of
            invitations this way, all printed one at a time with a press on handmade
            paper which they also make.....I am not a letterpress person so did not look
            at the name of the press, but it has a platten that moves forward and back
            with rollers that apply the ink, everything sits upright so it is different
            from what I think of as a proofing press.
            Solar plates are wonderful, I use them for etching but the ones I get are
            steel backed.You can get the steel backed plates from Dan Welden, the author
            of the book "Printmaking in the Sun" at http://www.solarplate.com
            Barbara


            Subject: [PPLetterpress] Solarplate
            > Does anyone out there have any experience with Solarplate? Can it be used
            > for letterpress, and if so, is it worthwhile in terms of quality and
            price?
            > He will be doing everything by hand, by the way, and understands that the
            > quality may suffer. He's using this primarily for experimental work.
            > Katie Harper
            > Ars Brevis Press
            > Cincinnati, OH
            > 513-233-9588
          • cutncrease
            Want to know anything about photopolymers. Try this. Although flexo based we re dealing with the same plastics http://www.macdermidga.com/tips/sheet.html Wayne
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 3, 2002
              Want to know anything about photopolymers.
              Try this. Although flexo based we're dealing with the same plastics

              http://www.macdermidga.com/tips/sheet.html

              Wayne


              > Dear List,
              >
              > Just about to make a big plate purchase but I want to get it right. I'm running a KSBA heidelberg with mixed formes (pics and text) and printing to
              > smooth uncoated stock. So I have a few key questions about what pp plates I should be using:
              >
              > Metal backed (aluminium) or Foil backed.
              >
              > What Height: .060?
              >
              > What Relief: .040?
              >
              > What Duro: 65-75?
              >
              > Are there any real differences between manufacturers products whose plates match spec.
              >
              > Any info really appreciated.
              >
              > Thanks,
              > Wayne.
            • bielerpr
              Hi Wayne This URL has been in the Bookmarks section since the list went up. Quite useful but you do have to ignore the flexo stuff. Some folks don t know there
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 4, 2002
                Hi Wayne

                This URL has been in the Bookmarks section since the list went up.
                Quite useful but you do have to ignore the flexo stuff. Some folks
                don't know there is a difference. "Back-exposure" is my favorite.

                I'd say your specs below are about right. .060 (not much shallower
                than that) for the Heidelberg with a deep relief of about .048 to
                prevent ink runoff. On a Vandercook I run .037-.038 at .026 depth.
                Fairly hard durometer for what you want to do. But the different
                manufacturers' plates do matter. Stick with BASF (nyloprint) or
                Toyobo (Printight) or Jet. There is some cheap junk out on the
                market. Steelbacked if you go with magnetic bases. On a Heidelberg
                I'd say get Buntings to prevent plate travel. (I'm sure Kyle will
                disagree.) Just sold a chase fitting of Buntings for the exact same
                model! 17+ by 21+ right?

                URLs for these are in Bookmarks and listings in the Database.

                Gerald

                --- In PPLetterpress@y..., "cutncrease" <wayne@h...> wrote:
                > Want to know anything about photopolymers.
                > Try this. Although flexo based we're dealing with the same plastics
                >
                > http://www.macdermidga.com/tips/sheet.html
                >
                > Wayne
                >
                >
                > > Dear List,
                > >
                > > Just about to make a big plate purchase but I want to get it right. I'm running a KSBA heidelberg with mixed formes (pics and text) and printing to
                > > smooth uncoated stock. So I have a few key questions about what pp plates I should be using:
                > >
                > > Metal backed (aluminium) or Foil backed.
                > >
                > > What Height: .060?
                > >
                > > What Relief: .040?
                > >
                > > What Duro: 65-75?
                > >
                > > Are there any real differences between manufacturers products whose plates match spec.
                > >
                > > Any info really appreciated.
                > >
                > > Thanks,
                > > Wayne.
              • Gerald Lange
                Dear Dan The Bunting Bases come in a lot of weird sizes. The reason for this is that Bunting has configured the sizing to fit, in combination, the various
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 5, 2002
                  Dear Dan

                  The Bunting Bases come in a lot of weird sizes. The reason for this is that
                  Bunting has configured the sizing to fit, in combination, the various chase
                  sizes of the major presses: C & P, Heidelberg, B & K, Miehle, New Era. Most of
                  the newer letterpress manufacturers (European) are running cylinder-shaped
                  magnetic bases, which Bunting also supplies.

                  Yes, while the magnetism of a Bunting is extremely strong, you can still
                  experience plate travel on a Heidleberg, especially with large solids of the
                  kind that you are running. Bunting provides bases with optional pin
                  registration and scribelines. I suspect most of the commerecial outfits would
                  buy these, but most folks running out of a studio might not want the added
                  expense to what is already a considerable expense. A cheap run around is a
                  butt bar, locked in with the base which prevents the plate from traveling.

                  All best

                  Gerald


                  The Indian Hill Press wrote:
                  >

                  >
                  > Could you describe in detail this "chase fitting"? And do you think
                  > Bunting would have a sufficiently strong magnet to make spray
                  > adhesive unnecessary?
                  >
                  > Dan Waters
                  > Indian Hill Press
                  >
                • The Indian Hill Press
                  Dear Gerald: In your reply to Wayne, you mention that you just sold a chase fitting of Buntings for a KSBA. We run our KSBA all the time, but I ve been leery
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 5, 2002
                    Dear Gerald:

                    In your reply to Wayne, you mention that you just sold a chase
                    fitting of Buntings for a KSBA.

                    We run our KSBA all the time, but I've been leery of using polymer
                    because of plate creep. (We use polymer frequently, but only on the
                    Windmill.)

                    Could you describe in detail this "chase fitting"? And do you think
                    Bunting would have a sufficiently strong magnet to make spray
                    adhesive unnecessary?

                    Dan Waters
                    Indian Hill Press

                    >Hi Wayne
                    >
                    >This URL has been in the Bookmarks section since the list went up.
                    >Quite useful but you do have to ignore the flexo stuff. Some folks
                    >don't know there is a difference. "Back-exposure" is my favorite.
                    >
                    >I'd say your specs below are about right. .060 (not much shallower
                    >than that) for the Heidelberg with a deep relief of about .048 to
                    >prevent ink runoff. On a Vandercook I run .037-.038 at .026 depth.
                    >Fairly hard durometer for what you want to do. But the different
                    >manufacturers' plates do matter. Stick with BASF (nyloprint) or
                    >Toyobo (Printight) or Jet. There is some cheap junk out on the
                    >market. Steelbacked if you go with magnetic bases. On a Heidelberg
                    >I'd say get Buntings to prevent plate travel. (I'm sure Kyle will
                    >disagree.) Just sold a chase fitting of Buntings for the exact same
                    >model! 17+ by 21+ right?
                    >
                    >URLs for these are in Bookmarks and listings in the Database.
                    >
                    >Gerald
                  • Gaylord Schanilec
                    Jerry. I too had the creeping problem with a bunting base on the KSBA. I wonder what Brad Hutchenson uses. Gaylor.d
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 5, 2002
                      Jerry. I too had the creeping problem with a bunting base on the KSBA. I
                      wonder what Brad Hutchenson uses. Gaylor.d

                      The Indian Hill Press wrote:

                      > Dear Gerald:
                      >
                      > In your reply to Wayne, you mention that you just sold a chase
                      > fitting of Buntings for a KSBA.
                      >
                      > We run our KSBA all the time, but I've been leery of using polymer
                      > because of plate creep. (We use polymer frequently, but only on the
                      > Windmill.)
                      >
                      > Could you describe in detail this "chase fitting"? And do you think
                      > Bunting would have a sufficiently strong magnet to make spray
                      > adhesive unnecessary?
                      >
                      > Dan Waters
                      > Indian Hill Press
                      >
                      > >Hi Wayne
                      > >
                      > >This URL has been in the Bookmarks section since the list went up.
                      > >Quite useful but you do have to ignore the flexo stuff. Some folks
                      > >don't know there is a difference. "Back-exposure" is my favorite.
                      > >
                      > >I'd say your specs below are about right. .060 (not much shallower
                      > >than that) for the Heidelberg with a deep relief of about .048 to
                      > >prevent ink runoff. On a Vandercook I run .037-.038 at .026 depth.
                      > >Fairly hard durometer for what you want to do. But the different
                      > >manufacturers' plates do matter. Stick with BASF (nyloprint) or
                      > >Toyobo (Printight) or Jet. There is some cheap junk out on the
                      > >market. Steelbacked if you go with magnetic bases. On a Heidelberg
                      > >I'd say get Buntings to prevent plate travel. (I'm sure Kyle will
                      > >disagree.) Just sold a chase fitting of Buntings for the exact same
                      > >model! 17+ by 21+ right?
                      > >
                      > >URLs for these are in Bookmarks and listings in the Database.
                      > >
                      > >Gerald
                      >
                      >
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