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re: "Boxcar System"

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  • parallel_imp
    I ve never used Boxcar plates, but know people who do and they are very satisfied. However, the idea that Boxcar has a unique System or that it is the only
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 12, 2005
      I've never used Boxcar plates, but know people who do and they are
      very satisfied.
      However, the idea that Boxcar has a unique "System" or that it is
      the only source for plastic-backed plates is mistaken. Clearly, they
      have done a lot of research and experimentation, and assembled in one
      place a product line that is immediately useful to a rank novice, and
      still as useable if they graduate to a Heidelberg SBBG. And Boxcar has
      done outreach to beginners in a way that few suppliers would, and
      given an unusually high level of service and guidance; I expect they
      will have a growing base of satisfied customers for as long as they
      like, especially considering how poorly small customers are treated by
      most suppliers.
      But plastic-backed plates are available from any photopolymer plate
      manufacturer and many suppliers: geez, Gene Becker's business card IS
      a plastic plate. Adhesive mounting and gridded bases have been in use
      for a long time. Steel-backed plates can also be cut apart on
      irregular paths, but it takes the right tools (things like curved
      snips, nibblers, coping saws) that may remove remove a strip of metal
      as they cut, losing that butt-fit somr of you use for registration.
      Steel plates are not limited to magnetic mounting bases; anything from
      lead high-base to plexiglas to wood can be used with sticky-back tape
      as long as plate, adhesive and base add up to .918", and this allows
      combination of plates with forms of metal type.

      Having said that, Boxcar's product does seem the easiest way in for
      the least cost, and few tools needed. Personally, I like using tools
      and steel-backed Rigilon, Pat-Mag and high-base work fine for me.
      Speaking of tools, if you're getting cuts when handling metal
      plates, try smoothing off the burrs with a file.

      Eric Holub, SF
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