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Terminology

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  • Gerald Lange
    Odd question. In a recent conversation with an old school letterpress book printer (like me), I heard the term carriage trade to describe the relatively
    Message 1 of 35 , Oct 23, 2005
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      Odd question.

      In a recent conversation with an "old school" letterpress book printer
      (like me), I heard the term "carriage trade" to describe the
      relatively recent influx of card printing folks to letterpress. I have
      previously heard (and used) "letterpress boutique." Both of these are,
      obviously, in their intent, derogatory. Like I said, "old school" (a
      phrase I have noted increasingly from students).

      Since this list is likely now composed of more members than not who
      actually are exclusively letterpress card printers, what is a
      preferred term?

      Gerald
    • Ludwig M. Solzen
      Kevin If you read German, all the books by Hans Peter Willberg are extremely interesting, in particular Lesetypographie and his latest Mikrotypographie . If
      Message 35 of 35 , Nov 10, 2005
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        Kevin

        If you read German, all the books by Hans Peter Willberg are extremely
        interesting, in particular "Lesetypographie" and his latest
        "Mikrotypographie". If you don't understand German, at least the highly
        comprehensible illustrations and exemplary text settings are worth it.
        Willberg deals both with the macro (and style) level as with the
        microtypographic level. It is however to the latter that his main interest
        seems to go (as is the case with every genuine typographer) and he
        elaborates the topic almost exhaustively as I haven't seen doing it before.

        To get the feel and touch with microtypographic issues directly relating to
        matters of type design: read Gerrit Noordzij ("LetterLetter" available in
        English from Hartley & Marks).

        Don't forget the classics: Paul Renner's "The Art of Typography", Jan
        Tschichold in various publications and Eric Gill in his "Essay on
        Typography", to name only some at random.

        Sometimes you may find some very interesting articles in the TeX-world, for
        instance in the TUGboat magazine, which has a chapter on typography. These
        guys (mathematicians and alike) are really doing a great job and some of the
        TeX-distributions (such as pdfTeX and XeTeX) offer the finest typographic
        software available today, often pioneering in areas were commercial vendors
        (such as Adobe) leap behind. Read their articles and you'll learn a lot
        about the possibilities of integrating thoroughly classic typography with
        digital automated design.

        Good reading! (Although I might agree with Noordzij: "Perhaps typographers
        never read.")

        Ludwig
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