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Re: Bases

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  • Gerald Lange
    Michael If you are using polyester-backed plates, and I d assume you are, all you need to know is the thickness of the plate and the thickness of the adhesive.
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 18, 2005
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      Michael

      If you are using polyester-backed plates, and I'd assume you are, all
      you need to know is the thickness of the plate and the thickness of
      the adhesive. Subtract that from .918 and bingo, you have the height
      of your base. Aluminum is often preferred, because of its lightweight
      and density, but I am unfamiliar with the maple board. Wood has
      usually been frowned upon as a base because of compression issues and
      likelyhood of warpage. The main thing is to ensure that the base is
      parallelized (the same measure all around). Best if you can get the
      variance down to no more than .001.

      Gerald

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "michaelmagnesi"
      <michaelmagnesi@y...> wrote:
      > Hello All,
      >
      > We have cleaned our Sp-20 and ordered a few replacement parts that
      > should be in Monday or Tuesday. The 219 is just going to have to wait
      > a while for it's cleaning and such.
      >
      > I guess that I might be opening a can of worms here but I need to know
      > what the deal is with the bases that I have seen for sale. I would
      > like to use a base for the entire print area of the presses but the
      > cost for even a small base seems to be very expensive. Can I not make
      > my own base or have a local machine shop mill a plate of aluminum or
      > steel to the correct thickness? Is the ultra strong maple die board
      > that is used for cutting dies suitable for this purpose? What is the
      > correct thickness?
      >
      > We will be printing posters or large forms most of the time and almost
      > always using photopolymer plates.
      >
      > I am a newby to all of this and probably only know enough to be
      > dangerous. I welcome all input!
      >
      > Thank you,
      > Michael Magnesi
      > Design Answers
      > Atlanta, Georgia
    • Scott Rubel
      Michael: If you are using steel-backed polymer plates, you may be interested in this. I have made a few of my own magnetic bases. These are the kinds Pat Reagh
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 18, 2005
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        Michael:

        If you are using steel-backed polymer plates, you may be interested
        in this. I have made a few of my own magnetic bases. These are the
        kinds Pat Reagh makes consisting of an aluminum block with a sheet of
        adhesive-backed, magnetic rubber applied to it. I bought real
        PatMags, also, but made my own when I needed extremely large or odd
        shapes for a poster-sized Vandercook.

        You need to start with a machine shop that can mill the bases close
        to final size, but they will not guarantee flatness. I found that,
        for large bases, it is necessary to have them blanchard ground. If
        you ask the machine shop, they probably know of a local service that
        does blanchard grinding. You will want to find someone who will
        guarantee thickness accuracy from one side of the plate to another
        with a couple thousandths of an inch. They more accuracy they
        guarantee, the more they charge. This of course can add up and take a
        lot of your time, and you can always compare your costs to that of
        having Pat Reagh do it. I have forgotten where I bought the rubber,
        too...this was years ago...some manufacturer in Los Angeles will sell
        you a roll for about $100 and it may last all your life. I think it
        is 30 thousandths thick.

        However, I have abandoned these types of bases altogether, and you
        probably will, too, after a few years of using them. Not only do you
        sometimes have to assist the weak magnetic rubber with a spray glue,
        but the rubber is too soft and if you're doing heavy impression work,
        you will find the rubber giving under the pressure and your steel
        polymer plate eventually becoming malformed. The Bunting bases that
        you saw for sale are the ultimate answer. Though they are extremely
        expensive, I am eternally grateful to be free of the problems and the
        necessity of occasionally refreshing the rubber on the PatMags. The
        ones you saw for sale are a good deal, though probably smaller than
        you would want.

        --Scott


        On Sep 18, 2005, at 7:49 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

        > Michael
        >
        > If you are using polyester-backed plates, and I'd assume you are, all
        > you need to know is the thickness of the plate and the thickness of
        > the adhesive. Subtract that from .918 and bingo, you have the height
        > of your base. Aluminum is often preferred, because of its lightweight
        > and density, but I am unfamiliar with the maple board. Wood has
        > usually been frowned upon as a base because of compression issues and
        > likelyhood of warpage. The main thing is to ensure that the base is
        > parallelized (the same measure all around). Best if you can get the
        > variance down to no more than .001.
        >
        > Gerald
        >
        > "michaelmagnesi" <michaelmagnesi@y...> wrote:
        >
        >> Hello All,
        >>
        >> We have cleaned our Sp-20 and ordered a few replacement parts that
        >> should be in Monday or Tuesday. The 219 is just going to have to wait
        >> a while for it's cleaning and such.
        >>
        >> I guess that I might be opening a can of worms here but I need to
        >> know
        >> what the deal is with the bases that I have seen for sale. I would
        >> like to use a base for the entire print area of the presses but the
        >> cost for even a small base seems to be very expensive. Can I not make
        >> my own base or have a local machine shop mill a plate of aluminum or
        >> steel to the correct thickness? Is the ultra strong maple die board
        >> that is used for cutting dies suitable for this purpose? What is the
        >> correct thickness?
        >>
        >> We will be printing posters or large forms most of the time and
        >> almost
        >> always using photopolymer plates.
        >>
        >> I am a newby to all of this and probably only know enough to be
        >> dangerous. I welcome all input!
        >>
        >> Thank you,
        >> Michael Magnesi
        >> Design Answers
        >> Atlanta, Georgia
      • LA. Book Arts
        If you need the Bunting bases, same deal: Bunting sells the insets magnetic pieces for top dollar, you can have a machine shop cut and grind a base. blanchard
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 18, 2005
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          If you need the Bunting bases, same deal:

          Bunting sells the insets magnetic pieces for top dollar, you can have
          a machine shop cut and grind a base. blanchard ground or wet stone
          milled, and have them route out the space for the magnetic Bunting
          insets, Use epoxy to set them, they have to be absolut level.
          .
          Mill the plate, route out, glue the pieces and have the ground it
          absolute plane.

          charles



          ------------------------------------
          L.A Book Arts, Inc.
          The Custom Bindery
          Krause Intaglio
          310.360.7265
          www.Custombindery.com
          ------------------------------------

          On Sep 18, 2005, at 7:24 PM, michaelmagnesi wrote:

          > Hello All,
          >
          > We have cleaned our Sp-20 and ordered a few replacement parts that
          > should be in Monday or Tuesday. The 219 is just going to have to wait
          > a while for it's cleaning and such.
          >
          > I guess that I might be opening a can of worms here but I need to know
          > what the deal is with the bases that I have seen for sale. I would
          > like to use a base for the entire print area of the presses but the
          > cost for even a small base seems to be very expensive. Can I not make
          > my own base or have a local machine shop mill a plate of aluminum or
          > steel to the correct thickness? Is the ultra strong maple die board
          > that is used for cutting dies suitable for this purpose? What is the
          > correct thickness?
          >
          > We will be printing posters or large forms most of the time and almost
          > always using photopolymer plates.
          >
          > I am a newby to all of this and probably only know enough to be
          > dangerous. I welcome all input!
          >
          > Thank you,
          > Michael Magnesi
          > Design Answers
          > Atlanta, Georgia
          >
          >
          >
          >
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        • Michael Magnesi
          Thank you! ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 18, 2005
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            Thank you!

            --- Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:

            > Michael
            >
            > If you are using polyester-backed plates, and I'd
            > assume you are, all
            > you need to know is the thickness of the plate and
            > the thickness of
            > the adhesive. Subtract that from .918 and bingo, you
            > have the height
            > of your base. Aluminum is often preferred, because
            > of its lightweight
            > and density, but I am unfamiliar with the maple
            > board. Wood has
            > usually been frowned upon as a base because of
            > compression issues and
            > likelyhood of warpage. The main thing is to ensure
            > that the base is
            > parallelized (the same measure all around). Best if
            > you can get the
            > variance down to no more than .001.
            >
            > Gerald
            >
            > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com,
            > "michaelmagnesi"
            > <michaelmagnesi@y...> wrote:
            > > Hello All,
            > >
            > > We have cleaned our Sp-20 and ordered a few
            > replacement parts that
            > > should be in Monday or Tuesday. The 219 is just
            > going to have to wait
            > > a while for it's cleaning and such.
            > >
            > > I guess that I might be opening a can of worms
            > here but I need to know
            > > what the deal is with the bases that I have seen
            > for sale. I would
            > > like to use a base for the entire print area of
            > the presses but the
            > > cost for even a small base seems to be very
            > expensive. Can I not make
            > > my own base or have a local machine shop mill a
            > plate of aluminum or
            > > steel to the correct thickness? Is the ultra
            > strong maple die board
            > > that is used for cutting dies suitable for this
            > purpose? What is the
            > > correct thickness?
            > >
            > > We will be printing posters or large forms most of
            > the time and almost
            > > always using photopolymer plates.
            > >
            > > I am a newby to all of this and probably only know
            > enough to be
            > > dangerous. I welcome all input!
            > >
            > > Thank you,
            > > Michael Magnesi
            > > Design Answers
            > > Atlanta, Georgia
            >
            >
            >


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          • Gerald Lange
            Michael One thing I forgot to mention is that you can t actually go too big in size. Bunting, for instance, will only sell bases bigger than 8-1/2 by 11 by
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 18, 2005
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              Michael

              One thing I forgot to mention is that you can't actually go too big in
              size. Bunting, for instance, will only sell bases bigger than 8-1/2 by
              11 by special order with the recommendation that you bolt them down to
              your press bed. They are a major industrial manufacturer of many many
              magnetic products (they introduced their magnetic base in the mid
              1980s) and if they think there is a problem in the guarantee of
              precision beyond a certain size, there is a problem.

              Gerald


              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Michael Magnesi
              <michaelmagnesi@y...> wrote:
              > Thank you!
              >
              > --- Gerald Lange <bieler@w...> wrote:
              >
              > > Michael
              > >
              > > If you are using polyester-backed plates, and I'd
              > > assume you are, all
              > > you need to know is the thickness of the plate and
              > > the thickness of
              > > the adhesive. Subtract that from .918 and bingo, you
              > > have the height
              > > of your base. Aluminum is often preferred, because
              > > of its lightweight
              > > and density, but I am unfamiliar with the maple
              > > board. Wood has
              > > usually been frowned upon as a base because of
              > > compression issues and
              > > likelyhood of warpage. The main thing is to ensure
              > > that the base is
              > > parallelized (the same measure all around). Best if
              > > you can get the
              > > variance down to no more than .001.
              > >
              > > Gerald
              > >
              > > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com,
              > > "michaelmagnesi"
              > > <michaelmagnesi@y...> wrote:
              > > > Hello All,
              > > >
              > > > We have cleaned our Sp-20 and ordered a few
              > > replacement parts that
              > > > should be in Monday or Tuesday. The 219 is just
              > > going to have to wait
              > > > a while for it's cleaning and such.
              > > >
              > > > I guess that I might be opening a can of worms
              > > here but I need to know
              > > > what the deal is with the bases that I have seen
              > > for sale. I would
              > > > like to use a base for the entire print area of
              > > the presses but the
              > > > cost for even a small base seems to be very
              > > expensive. Can I not make
              > > > my own base or have a local machine shop mill a
              > > plate of aluminum or
              > > > steel to the correct thickness? Is the ultra
              > > strong maple die board
              > > > that is used for cutting dies suitable for this
              > > purpose? What is the
              > > > correct thickness?
              > > >
              > > > We will be printing posters or large forms most of
              > > the time and almost
              > > > always using photopolymer plates.
              > > >
              > > > I am a newby to all of this and probably only know
              > > enough to be
              > > > dangerous. I welcome all input!
              > > >
              > > > Thank you,
              > > > Michael Magnesi
              > > > Design Answers
              > > > Atlanta, Georgia
            • Gerald Lange
              Hi Charles I d think by the time you were done, you d probably have spent more money than you would if you bought a Bunting? The magnets though are flat
              Message 6 of 12 , Sep 18, 2005
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                Hi Charles

                I'd think by the time you were done, you'd probably have spent more
                money than you would if you bought a Bunting?

                The magnets though are flat ceramic and thus transfer their strength
                sideways to steel inserts. The steel is what provides the magnetism,
                same as with a galley magnet. Otherwise, you'd never be able to get a
                plate off the base, they'd be far too strong.

                But, I'd think the problem with re-engineering the whole thing,
                besides the careful assembling, is how do you grind smooth and
                precisely all these different elements: epoxy, steel, ceramic, aluminum?

                Gerald


                >
                >
                > If you need the Bunting bases, same deal:
                >
                > Bunting sells the insets magnetic pieces for top dollar, you can have
                > a machine shop cut and grind a base. blanchard ground or wet stone
                > milled, and have them route out the space for the magnetic Bunting
                > insets, Use epoxy to set them, they have to be absolut level.
                > .
                > Mill the plate, route out, glue the pieces and have the ground it
                > absolute plane.
                >
                > charles
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                > L.A Book Arts, Inc.
                > The Custom Bindery
                > Krause Intaglio
                > 310.360.7265
                > www.Custombindery.com
                > ------------------------------------
                >
              • LA. Book Arts
                Gerald, I did a 12 x18 that way for a friend I set up with a CP Platen. I have a shop in Long Beach for the Blanchard grinding, the square cut is also done by
                Message 7 of 12 , Sep 19, 2005
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                  Gerald,

                  I did a 12 x18 that way for a friend I set up with a CP Platen.
                  I have a shop in Long Beach for the Blanchard grinding, the square
                  cut is also done by them.
                  With the insets from Bunting, it came to 1425.50 total.
                  Thats a lot of cash, yes, but he wouldn't have gotten one for that
                  price on the market.
                  But, he's also a friend, so I charge cost and he does the running
                  around.


                  My bases are all with magnetic sheeting, the ones I use in my shop.
                  You had recently seen my shop and my kind of equipment.
                  I don't have a problem with plate creep and all of that stuff. I also
                  dampen my stock and don't use lower cost papers.

                  Most of the problems I see in this discussions of bases and
                  platemaking is preparation, research, financial investment.
                  There is no shortcut and there is no cheap way to generate a good
                  polymerplate.
                  My main clients are printmakers who print on the etching press. I
                  also see a lot of homemade solarplate and all the BS from the people
                  who bring it in, They print a proof on my press, which as she is
                  made from cast iron can print with a delicacy of pressure which can't
                  be emulated by a press build in the last 50 years.
                  I use their film and make a plate on my equipment, we print both and
                  it's always such a striking difference how much detail and subtleness
                  is not present in an underdeveloped solarplate.
                  Same in Letterpress, people see type on the plate but don't know the
                  value of stroke and can't judge if what they made is a exact
                  rendering of what the film had.
                  And they want to punch the sheet.

                  I just pulled a edition of 10 postersize prints, 5 color and hey
                  needed to be deep punched.
                  Used Saunders heavyweight , that's a mouldmade sheet which retails
                  for 22.00 Pund a sheet. dampens real nice and gives you deep
                  impression from a BASF 152 without having to overink.

                  But knowledge is the difference in knowing how to print.

                  As I saw recently, printing a Envelope on a windmill and the plate
                  moved all over the place, as the packing was so heavy that the
                  pressure had to force the plate to move.
                  Envelope was a cheap nr. 10, with no weight or thickness for
                  impression. And yes, they charge for this stuff more than we would
                  ever dream of asking.

                  charles


                  On Sep 18, 2005, at 11:44 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

                  > Hi Charles
                  >
                  > I'd think by the time you were done, you'd probably have spent more
                  > money than you would if you bought a Bunting?
                  >
                  > The magnets though are flat ceramic and thus transfer their strength
                  > sideways to steel inserts. The steel is what provides the magnetism,
                  > same as with a galley magnet. Otherwise, you'd never be able to get a
                  > plate off the base, they'd be far too strong.
                  >
                  > But, I'd think the problem with re-engineering the whole thing,
                  > besides the careful assembling, is how do you grind smooth and
                  > precisely all these different elements: epoxy, steel, ceramic,
                  > aluminum?
                  >
                  > Gerald
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> If you need the Bunting bases, same deal:
                  >>
                  >> Bunting sells the insets magnetic pieces for top dollar, you can have
                  >> a machine shop cut and grind a base. blanchard ground or wet stone
                  >> milled, and have them route out the space for the magnetic Bunting
                  >> insets, Use epoxy to set them, they have to be absolut level.
                  >> .
                  >> Mill the plate, route out, glue the pieces and have the ground it
                  >> absolute plane.
                  >>
                  >> charles
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> ------------------------------------
                  >> L.A Book Arts, Inc.
                  >> The Custom Bindery
                  >> Krause Intaglio
                  >> 310.360.7265
                  >> www.Custombindery.com
                  >> ------------------------------------
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
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                • Marnie Powers-Torrey
                  Hi Michael, Although Charles and Gerald have far more experience than I, I have printed several fine press books for the Red Butte Press from photopolymer
                  Message 8 of 12 , Sep 19, 2005
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                    Hi Michael,

                    Although Charles and Gerald have far more experience than I, I have
                    printed several fine press books for the Red Butte Press from
                    photopolymer plates, and I have assisted many students in their serious
                    endeavors with photopolymer plates.

                    I think having a boxcar press base would be fantastic! However, we can't
                    afford one right now. We have six ground steel bases from a local metal
                    shop. We had them ground to within a .001". They are square back to
                    front, but not on all four sides as this was a fairly large additional
                    cost. Anyway, our largest fills the press bed. We use 3M #77 adhesive to
                    adhere to the base.

                    For registering, we just use a tad of adhesive, scoot it around as
                    needed. Then when the plate is right where it needs to be, we outline it
                    on the base with a fine point sharpie, respray the corners and a bit on
                    the middle of the plate, and put it back down for the entire run. We've
                    run really tight registration and long runs (around 500) without
                    slippage.

                    I know all this is highly debatable, but it works for us. So does our
                    homemade exposure unit and hand developing. I think it's just all about
                    keeping all the variables VERY consistent and getting familiar with your
                    process to make it work for you.

                    Okay, my two cents worth. I wouldn't mind have a platemaker and bunting
                    bases...

                    Marnie

                    Marnie Powers-Torrey
                    Studio Manager, Instructor, Printer
                    Book Arts Program and Red Butte Press
                    J. Willard Marriott Library
                    295 South 1500 East
                    Salt Lake City, UT 84112




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Gerald Lange
                    Charles Actually two 8.5 by 11.25 Buntings (11.25 by 17) cost $1,560 at current retail. And you d get the benefit of their engineering and manufacturing! Plus
                    Message 9 of 12 , Sep 19, 2005
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                      Charles

                      Actually two 8.5 by 11.25 Buntings (11.25 by 17) cost $1,560 at current
                      retail. And you'd get the benefit of their engineering and
                      manufacturing! Plus a lifetime guarantee.

                      FYI: I just checked comparative sizes/prices of the Patmag and Boxcar.
                      At 12 by 16 the Patmag retails at $364 and the Boxcar at $450.

                      Gerald

                      LA. Book Arts wrote:

                      >Gerald,
                      >
                      >I did a 12 x18 that way for a friend I set up with a CP Platen.
                      >I have a shop in Long Beach for the Blanchard grinding, the square
                      >cut is also done by them.
                      >With the insets from Bunting, it came to 1425.50 total.
                      >Thats a lot of cash, yes, but he wouldn't have gotten one for that
                      >price on the market.
                      >But, he's also a friend, so I charge cost and he does the running
                      >around.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >charles
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >>
                      >>
                    • Shelly Monte
                      Dear Marnie, I saw your thread here and wonder if you have any plans for building a plate processor? I have been thinking that it is possible and wonder how I
                      Message 10 of 12 , Sep 19, 2005
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                        Dear Marnie, I saw your thread here and wonder if you have any plans for
                        building a plate processor? I have been thinking that it is possible and
                        wonder how I can find out how to build one or have a friend who is capable
                        of such things, do so for me. Any information you would be willing to share
                        would be most appreciated.
                        Thanks,
                        Shelly Monte
                        Epiphany Letterpress


                        On 9/19/05 9:47 AM, "Marnie Powers-Torrey" <marnie.torrey@...>
                        wrote:

                        > Hi Michael,
                        >
                        > Although Charles and Gerald have far more experience than I, I have
                        > printed several fine press books for the Red Butte Press from
                        > photopolymer plates, and I have assisted many students in their serious
                        > endeavors with photopolymer plates.
                        >
                        > I think having a boxcar press base would be fantastic! However, we can't
                        > afford one right now. We have six ground steel bases from a local metal
                        > shop. We had them ground to within a .001". They are square back to
                        > front, but not on all four sides as this was a fairly large additional
                        > cost. Anyway, our largest fills the press bed. We use 3M #77 adhesive to
                        > adhere to the base.
                        >
                        > For registering, we just use a tad of adhesive, scoot it around as
                        > needed. Then when the plate is right where it needs to be, we outline it
                        > on the base with a fine point sharpie, respray the corners and a bit on
                        > the middle of the plate, and put it back down for the entire run. We've
                        > run really tight registration and long runs (around 500) without
                        > slippage.
                        >
                        > I know all this is highly debatable, but it works for us. So does our
                        > homemade exposure unit and hand developing. I think it's just all about
                        > keeping all the variables VERY consistent and getting familiar with your
                        > process to make it work for you.
                        >
                        > Okay, my two cents worth. I wouldn't mind have a platemaker and bunting
                        > bases...
                        >
                        > Marnie
                        >
                        > Marnie Powers-Torrey
                        > Studio Manager, Instructor, Printer
                        > Book Arts Program and Red Butte Press
                        > J. Willard Marriott Library
                        > 295 South 1500 East
                        > Salt Lake City, UT 84112
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >
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                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Marnie Powers-Torrey
                        A friend made our exposure unit. It has it s disadvantages to be sure, but we have developed a good relationship with it! It is small and consists of a drawer
                        Message 11 of 12 , Sep 19, 2005
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                          A friend made our exposure unit. It has it's disadvantages to be sure,
                          but we have developed a good relationship with it!

                          It is small and consists of a drawer in a box. The drawer is a box
                          itself. The top of the box has 1/8" holes drilled in it in a grid
                          pattern. The area below is an open box with a hose attached to it. The
                          vacuum is attached to this hose. We use the vacuum sheets that Gene
                          Becker sells. It's a clear, strong sheet to cover all the holes once the
                          plate and neg are placed on/in the drawer. So you open the drawer, sit
                          the plate down, sit the negative down, put the vacuum sheet over it,
                          turn the vacuum on, and encourage a tight seal by pressing the negative
                          to the plate and the vacuum sheet firmly in place. The only disadvantage
                          to this set up is that the plate must be slightly larger than the
                          negative so that the negative doesn't lift off the plate when the vacuum
                          kicks on.

                          The black-light blue bulbs are about 4.5 inches from the top of the
                          drawer and are spaced about 1" apart from one another.

                          The vacuum and bulbs are set on seperate timers so that you can set the
                          vacuum longer than the exposure and so that you can post expose without
                          the vacuum.

                          Hope this helps!

                          Marnie

                          Marnie Powers-Torrey
                          Studio Manager, Instructor, Printer
                          Book Arts Program and Red Butte Press
                          J. Willard Marriott Library
                          295 South 1500 East
                          Salt Lake City, UT 84112


                          _____

                          From: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                          [mailto:PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Shelly Monte
                          Sent: Monday, September 19, 2005 11:41 AM
                          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Bases


                          Dear Marnie, I saw your thread here and wonder if you have any plans for
                          building a plate processor? I have been thinking that it is possible
                          and
                          wonder how I can find out how to build one or have a friend who is
                          capable
                          of such things, do so for me. Any information you would be willing to
                          share
                          would be most appreciated.
                          Thanks,
                          Shelly Monte
                          Epiphany Letterpress


                          On 9/19/05 9:47 AM, "Marnie Powers-Torrey"
                          <marnie.torrey@...>
                          wrote:

                          > Hi Michael,
                          >
                          > Although Charles and Gerald have far more experience than I, I have
                          > printed several fine press books for the Red Butte Press from
                          > photopolymer plates, and I have assisted many students in their
                          serious
                          > endeavors with photopolymer plates.
                          >
                          > I think having a boxcar press base would be fantastic! However, we
                          can't
                          > afford one right now. We have six ground steel bases from a local
                          metal
                          > shop. We had them ground to within a .001". They are square back to
                          > front, but not on all four sides as this was a fairly large additional
                          > cost. Anyway, our largest fills the press bed. We use 3M #77 adhesive
                          to
                          > adhere to the base.
                          >
                          > For registering, we just use a tad of adhesive, scoot it around as
                          > needed. Then when the plate is right where it needs to be, we outline
                          it
                          > on the base with a fine point sharpie, respray the corners and a bit
                          on
                          > the middle of the plate, and put it back down for the entire run.
                          We've
                          > run really tight registration and long runs (around 500) without
                          > slippage.
                          >
                          > I know all this is highly debatable, but it works for us. So does our
                          > homemade exposure unit and hand developing. I think it's just all
                          about
                          > keeping all the variables VERY consistent and getting familiar with
                          your
                          > process to make it work for you.
                          >
                          > Okay, my two cents worth. I wouldn't mind have a platemaker and
                          bunting
                          > bases...
                          >
                          > Marnie
                          >
                          > Marnie Powers-Torrey
                          > Studio Manager, Instructor, Printer
                          > Book Arts Program and Red Butte Press
                          > J. Willard Marriott Library
                          > 295 South 1500 East
                          > Salt Lake City, UT 84112
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >
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                          >
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