Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Which Ink base is best for what?

Expand Messages
  • Charles Jones
    ... Gerald is right, Sherry, Ink, like paint, is priced according to the amount of pigment, or conversely, filler, it contains. You also need to think about
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 6, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      On Sep 5, 2005, at 11:22 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

      > Sherry
      >
      > What kind of work will you be doing? and what kind of press will you
      > be printing with? Hard to make recommendations without that
      > information. Quality ink is worth the investment, but it might be best
      > to know what you will be doing before we can steer you in the right
      > direction.
      >
      > You really don't need to buy a lot of colors, just the basic
      > primaries, a good black or two, and a good transparent and opaque
      > white. And then a little bit more, and a little bit more. But don't
      > jump in all at once.
      >
      > Gerald

      Gerald is right, Sherry,
      Ink, like paint, is priced according to the amount of pigment, or
      conversely, filler, it contains.
      You also need to think about the surface that you will be printing on.
      The rubber base inks were traditionally preferred by letterpress
      printers because they stayed open on the press but dried quickly on
      paper. If you print onto certain coated papers or vellums the ink
      might be wet several days after printing. Hand litho inks are used by
      many because of the intensity of colors. They are also expensive
      because they are so highly pigmented. Graphic Chemical also has a line
      of perfection palate inks that with a touch of setswell compound print
      nicely. Some colors of whatever brand don't mix as well as the
      manufactered ink. For example, oranges and purples are hard to mix.
      What you should do is buy the basic primaries as was recommended, and
      then small amounts of others as needed. Inks or paints are made with
      differing pigments so that Cobalt, manganese, and ultramarine blue for
      example will be warmer or cooler when mixed with white and would make
      very different greens. Try to get small amounts to begin with until
      you see what will be the most useful.
      Cheers, Charlie

      LaNana Creek Press
      13001 SFA Station
      Nacogdoches, TX 75962
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.