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Which Ink base is best for what?

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  • sherrybar@aol.com
    I am a new letterpress printer. I am about to invest in a quantity of ink and am interested in which ink is the best one to start with. I will be mixing
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 5, 2005
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      I am a new letterpress printer. I am about to invest in a quantity of ink
      and am interested in which ink is the best one to start with. I will be
      mixing colors and using both lead type, cuts and polymer plates. As far as I can
      tell, there are rubber base, oil base, and a Polymer base (Pro-Line PPI). It
      is a substantial sum to get 10 - 15 colors and I want great results. Advise
      please> Sherry B


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gerald Lange
      Sherry What kind of work will you be doing? and what kind of press will you be printing with? Hard to make recommendations without that information. Quality
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 5, 2005
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        Sherry

        What kind of work will you be doing? and what kind of press will you
        be printing with? Hard to make recommendations without that
        information. Quality ink is worth the investment, but it might be best
        to know what you will be doing before we can steer you in the right
        direction.

        You really don't need to buy a lot of colors, just the basic
        primaries, a good black or two, and a good transparent and opaque
        white. And then a little bit more, and a little bit more. But don't
        jump in all at once.

        Gerald


        > I am a new letterpress printer. I am about to invest in a quantity
        of ink
        > and am interested in which ink is the best one to start with. I
        will be
        > mixing colors and using both lead type, cuts and polymer plates. As
        far as I can
        > tell, there are rubber base, oil base, and a Polymer base (Pro-Line
        PPI). It
        > is a substantial sum to get 10 - 15 colors and I want great
        results. Advise
        > please> Sherry B
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jessica Spring
        Everybody seems to have preferences for different brands, so you might want to try out several. NA Graphics sells an eight color set of Graphic Chemical ink in
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 5, 2005
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          Everybody seems to have preferences for different brands, so you might want
          to try out several. NA Graphics sells an eight color set of Graphic Chemical
          ink in small tubes, oil base. Daniel Smith also has a starter set of their
          oil based ink in 1/4 pound cans or small tubes. Once you figure out what you
          like, you can move to the pound cans.
          --Jessica


          > From: sherrybar@...
          > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2005 16:33:56 EDT
          > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Which Ink base is best for what?
          >
          > I am a new letterpress printer. I am about to invest in a quantity of ink
          > and am interested in which ink is the best one to start with. I will be
          > mixing colors and using both lead type, cuts and polymer plates. As far as I
          > can
          > tell, there are rubber base, oil base, and a Polymer base (Pro-Line PPI). It
          > is a substantial sum to get 10 - 15 colors and I want great results. Advise
          > please> Sherry B
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Charles Jones
          ... Gerald is right, Sherry, Ink, like paint, is priced according to the amount of pigment, or conversely, filler, it contains. You also need to think about
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 6, 2005
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            On Sep 5, 2005, at 11:22 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

            > Sherry
            >
            > What kind of work will you be doing? and what kind of press will you
            > be printing with? Hard to make recommendations without that
            > information. Quality ink is worth the investment, but it might be best
            > to know what you will be doing before we can steer you in the right
            > direction.
            >
            > You really don't need to buy a lot of colors, just the basic
            > primaries, a good black or two, and a good transparent and opaque
            > white. And then a little bit more, and a little bit more. But don't
            > jump in all at once.
            >
            > Gerald

            Gerald is right, Sherry,
            Ink, like paint, is priced according to the amount of pigment, or
            conversely, filler, it contains.
            You also need to think about the surface that you will be printing on.
            The rubber base inks were traditionally preferred by letterpress
            printers because they stayed open on the press but dried quickly on
            paper. If you print onto certain coated papers or vellums the ink
            might be wet several days after printing. Hand litho inks are used by
            many because of the intensity of colors. They are also expensive
            because they are so highly pigmented. Graphic Chemical also has a line
            of perfection palate inks that with a touch of setswell compound print
            nicely. Some colors of whatever brand don't mix as well as the
            manufactered ink. For example, oranges and purples are hard to mix.
            What you should do is buy the basic primaries as was recommended, and
            then small amounts of others as needed. Inks or paints are made with
            differing pigments so that Cobalt, manganese, and ultramarine blue for
            example will be warmer or cooler when mixed with white and would make
            very different greens. Try to get small amounts to begin with until
            you see what will be the most useful.
            Cheers, Charlie

            LaNana Creek Press
            13001 SFA Station
            Nacogdoches, TX 75962
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