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Re: [PPLetterpress] Sheeps Wool Brush For Bronzing

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  • Regis Graden
    Gerald, I have used soft medium length brushes to bronze with. Always works fine. Use a breathing mask. Regis Gerald Lange wrote: In
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 12, 2005
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      Gerald,

      I have used soft medium length brushes to bronze with. Always works fine. Use a breathing mask.

      Regis

      Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:
      In the 1900 ATF specimen catalog sheeps wool pads were offered for
      bronzing. Does anyone know of a current industry that might supply
      brushes or pads made of sheeps wool? I've Goggled.

      Gerald





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    • Gerald Lange
      Regis Likely the breathing mask wouldn t do much good one way or the other at this late date. Far too many contaminants have been ingested by this old body.
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 12, 2005
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        Regis

        Likely the breathing mask wouldn't do much good one way or the other
        at this late date. Far too many contaminants have been ingested by
        this old body. Thanks for the concern though.

        My understanding of the process is that a pad is best for application
        and a brush for wiping away the access. The sheeps wool apparently
        contains a lanolin that rejects the dusting powder (thus facilitating
        transfer) and prevents accumulation. As far as I have found, no one
        manufacturers anything like this anymore. And, besides, I really like
        having the most appropriate tool; for as you know, "inferior tools
        corrode the spirit"!

        Gerald


        > Gerald,
        >
        > I have used soft medium length brushes to bronze with. Always works
        fine. Use a breathing mask.
        >
        > Regis
        >
        > Gerald Lange <bieler@w...> wrote:
        > In the 1900 ATF specimen catalog sheeps wool pads were offered for
        > bronzing. Does anyone know of a current industry that might supply
        > brushes or pads made of sheeps wool? I've Goggled.
        >
        > Gerald
        >
      • Farida Bee
        Gerald, Conservation Support Systems offers the Classic Hake Brush with the finest, softest, select sheep hair. Our conservator has a few on hand. I think
        Message 3 of 13 , Aug 12, 2005
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          Gerald,

          Conservation Support Systems offers the Classic Hake
          Brush with the "finest, softest, select sheep hair."
          Our conservator has a few on hand. I think CSS is
          based in Santa Barbara.

          http://www.silcom.com/~css/

          This may be a crazy idea, but if you wanted to make
          your own sheep's wool pad, the LA County Fair is
          coming up next month; you could take home freshly
          sheared wool....

          Farida


          > My understanding of the process is that a pad is
          > best for application
          > and a brush for wiping away the access. The sheeps
          > wool apparently
          > contains a lanolin that rejects the dusting powder
          > (thus facilitating
          > transfer) and prevents accumulation. As far as I
          > have found, no one
          > manufacturers anything like this anymore. And,
          > besides, I really like
          > having the most appropriate tool; for as you know,
          > "inferior tools
          > corrode the spirit"!
          >
          > Gerald

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        • Gerald Lange
          Farida Crazy ideas are the best. I doubt I have a month :—) but thank you so much. Gerald
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 12, 2005
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            Farida

            Crazy ideas are the best. I doubt I have a month :—) but thank you so
            much.

            Gerald


            > Gerald,
            >
            > Conservation Support Systems offers the Classic Hake
            > Brush with the "finest, softest, select sheep hair."
            > Our conservator has a few on hand. I think CSS is
            > based in Santa Barbara.
            >
            > http://www.silcom.com/~css/
            >
            > This may be a crazy idea, but if you wanted to make
            > your own sheep's wool pad, the LA County Fair is
            > coming up next month; you could take home freshly
            > sheared wool....
            >
            > Farida
            >
            >
            > > My understanding of the process is that a pad is
            > > best for application
            > > and a brush for wiping away the access. The sheeps
            > > wool apparently
            > > contains a lanolin that rejects the dusting powder
            > > (thus facilitating
            > > transfer) and prevents accumulation. As far as I
            > > have found, no one
            > > manufacturers anything like this anymore. And,
            > > besides, I really like
            > > having the most appropriate tool; for as you know,
            > > "inferior tools
            > > corrode the spirit"!
            > >
            > > Gerald
            >
          • Kathleen Whalen
            You might investigate the range of brushes that are sold to apply make-up (cosmetic powders). Graham Moss Incline Press 36 Bow Street Oldham OL1 1SJ England
            Message 5 of 13 , Aug 13, 2005
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              You might investigate the range of brushes that are sold to apply make-up
              (cosmetic powders).


              Graham Moss
              Incline Press
              36 Bow Street
              Oldham OL1 1SJ England
              http://www.inclinepress.com



              On 12/8/05 23:17, "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...> wrote:

              > In the 1900 ATF specimen catalog sheeps wool pads were offered for
              > bronzing. Does anyone know of a current industry that might supply
              > brushes or pads made of sheeps wool? I've Goggled.
              >
              > Gerald
            • Kathleen Whalen
              Ah, now I understand a little better. What about the sheepskin gloves, with the sheepswool inside them? Or the mitts made for fines polishing? Lanolin is
              Message 6 of 13 , Aug 13, 2005
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                Ah, now I understand a little better. What about the sheepskin gloves, with
                the sheepswool inside them? Or the mitts made for fines polishing? Lanolin
                is available bottled as an oil if that's the major factor.


                Graham Moss
                Incline Press
                36 Bow Street
                Oldham OL1 1SJ England
                http://www.inclinepress.com




                On 13/8/05 05:25, "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...> wrote:

                > Regis
                >
                > Likely the breathing mask wouldn't do much good one way or the other
                > at this late date. Far too many contaminants have been ingested by
                > this old body. Thanks for the concern though.
                >
                > My understanding of the process is that a pad is best for application
                > and a brush for wiping away the access. The sheeps wool apparently
                > contains a lanolin that rejects the dusting powder (thus facilitating
                > transfer) and prevents accumulation. As far as I have found, no one
                > manufacturers anything like this anymore. And, besides, I really like
                > having the most appropriate tool; for as you know, "inferior tools
                > corrode the spirit"!
                >
                > Gerald
              • Gerald Lange
                Graham Well, initially I did think about this, just because I thought the shape useful. But they don t tell you what the brushes are made of. I did learn that
                Message 7 of 13 , Aug 13, 2005
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                  Graham

                  Well, initially I did think about this, just because I thought the
                  shape useful. But they don't tell you what the brushes are made of. I
                  did learn that camel hair brushes are made from squirrel tail but no
                  further information on the chemical part of all of this. Best sources
                  seem to be those old 19th c. recipe books. Have a bunch of them.
                  Sheeps wool.

                  Gerald


                  > You might investigate the range of brushes that are sold to apply
                  make-up
                  > (cosmetic powders).
                  >
                  >
                  > Graham Moss
                  > Incline Press
                  > 36 Bow Street
                  > Oldham OL1 1SJ England
                  > http://www.inclinepress.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On 12/8/05 23:17, "Gerald Lange" <bieler@w...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > In the 1900 ATF specimen catalog sheeps wool pads were offered for
                  > > bronzing. Does anyone know of a current industry that might supply
                  > > brushes or pads made of sheeps wool? I've Goggled.
                  > >
                  > > Gerald
                • Regis Graden
                  Gerald, Very interesting about the sheep s wool rejecting etc. Another thing I didn t know. I learn something new every day! Thanks, Regis Gerald Lange
                  Message 8 of 13 , Aug 13, 2005
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                    Gerald,

                    Very interesting about the sheep's wool rejecting etc. Another thing I didn't know. I learn something new every day!

                    Thanks,

                    Regis

                    Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:
                    Regis

                    Likely the breathing mask wouldn't do much good one way or the other
                    at this late date. Far too many contaminants have been ingested by
                    this old body. Thanks for the concern though.

                    My understanding of the process is that a pad is best for application
                    and a brush for wiping away the access. The sheeps wool apparently
                    contains a lanolin that rejects the dusting powder (thus facilitating
                    transfer) and prevents accumulation. As far as I have found, no one
                    manufacturers anything like this anymore. And, besides, I really like
                    having the most appropriate tool; for as you know, "inferior tools
                    corrode the spirit"!

                    Gerald


                    > Gerald,
                    >
                    > I have used soft medium length brushes to bronze with. Always works
                    fine. Use a breathing mask.
                    >
                    > Regis
                    >
                    > Gerald Lange <bieler@w...> wrote:
                    > In the 1900 ATF specimen catalog sheeps wool pads were offered for
                    > bronzing. Does anyone know of a current industry that might supply
                    > brushes or pads made of sheeps wool? I've Goggled.
                    >
                    > Gerald
                    >




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                  • John Cornelisse
                    Hi All, The attraction of the dust-particles is an just a electrical phenomomen... Static electricity... The cotton wool I normally use works fine, the cotton
                    Message 9 of 13 , Aug 13, 2005
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                      Hi All,

                      The attraction of the dust-particles is an just a electrical phenomomen...

                      Static electricity...

                      The cotton wool I normally use works fine, the cotton fibres
                      have some electric charge, and this attracts the metal.

                      The lanoline in wool can be taken away very easely, just wash it it a few times
                      with some soft soap...

                      After this, I think you can use sheep wool too.

                      .............

                      Some weeks ago, I found some other colors: a very dark green, and a dark
                      red powder
                      in an old printshop, the owner has passed away some years ago...

                      I will try that powders some time for sure.

                      Best wishes

                      John Cornelisse




                      At 21:01 13-08-2005, you wrote:
                      >Gerald,
                      >
                      >Very interesting about the sheep's wool rejecting etc. Another thing I
                      >didn't know. I learn something new every day!
                      >
                      >Thanks,
                      >
                      >Regis
                      >
                      >Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:
                      >Regis
                      >
                      >Likely the breathing mask wouldn't do much good one way or the other
                      >at this late date. Far too many contaminants have been ingested by
                      >this old body. Thanks for the concern though.
                      >
                      >My understanding of the process is that a pad is best for application
                      >and a brush for wiping away the access. The sheeps wool apparently
                      >contains a lanolin that rejects the dusting powder (thus facilitating
                      >transfer) and prevents accumulation. As far as I have found, no one
                      >manufacturers anything like this anymore. And, besides, I really like
                      >having the most appropriate tool; for as you know, "inferior tools
                      >corrode the spirit"!
                      >
                      >Gerald
                      >
                      >
                      > > Gerald,
                      > >
                      > > I have used soft medium length brushes to bronze with. Always works
                      >fine. Use a breathing mask.
                      > >
                      > > Regis
                      > >
                      > > Gerald Lange <bieler@w...> wrote:
                      > > In the 1900 ATF specimen catalog sheeps wool pads were offered for
                      > > bronzing. Does anyone know of a current industry that might supply
                      > > brushes or pads made of sheeps wool? I've Goggled.
                      > >
                      > > Gerald
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
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                    • cutvelvet@earthlink.net
                      ... If we re talking about the same bronzing powder--mine is in a small metal can from the 40s or 50s--I m wondering how easily you ve been able to wipe away
                      Message 10 of 13 , Aug 15, 2005
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                        >My understanding of the process is that a pad is best for application
                        >and a brush for wiping away the access. The sheeps wool apparently
                        >contains a lanolin that rejects the dusting powder (thus facilitating
                        >transfer) and prevents accumulation.

                        If we're talking about the same bronzing powder--mine is in a small
                        metal can from the 40s or 50s--I'm wondering how easily you've been
                        able to wipe away the excess. Mine seems to cling almost as
                        ferociously to the rest of the paper as to the fresh ink. I've heard
                        the process works much better on a smooth or even slick paper, but
                        that's not what I want to print on. Have you used this powder on
                        mildly textured art papers, like Arches cover or Somerset velvet? Any
                        suggestions would be appreciated. I've even resorted to making a
                        template within which to brush on the powder, in order to minimize
                        the amount that wanders.

                        Thanks--

                        Lisa
                        Littoral Press
                      • Fritz Klinke
                        Lisa brings up an excellent point in this discussion about type of paper. All of the bronzing work I was involved with on a commercial basis when I worked in
                        Message 11 of 13 , Aug 15, 2005
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                          Lisa brings up an excellent point in this discussion about type of paper.
                          All of the bronzing work I was involved with on a commercial basis when I
                          worked in San Francisco (1960s) was done on coated paper, and primarily for
                          food can labels. These were typically the large sheets off our 54x77 inch
                          Miehle 4 and 5 color units (offset) and the printed sheets when dry were run
                          through the bronzing machine that laid down an image of varnish in the
                          appropriate location and the sheet then passed immediately into the bronzing
                          unit of the machine. The sheet then went through a vacuuming unit to remove
                          the excess powder, then through a 30 foot long drying unit. But what a messy
                          operation--that part of the plant was permanently gold colored, and I don't
                          think it was a healthy place to be. Gold on tuna fish labels, etc., was a
                          nice touch, but one we have all gotten used to not seeing on the grocery
                          shelves at least for labels printed in this country.

                          Coarse fibered stock, and that will be most uncoated sheets other than
                          smooth finish book, index, and bond papers, will trap the bronze powder.

                          Fritz

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: <cutvelvet@...>
                          To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Monday, August 15, 2005 9:33 AM
                          Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Sheeps Wool Brush For Bronzing


                          > >My understanding of the process is that a pad is best for application
                          >>and a brush for wiping away the access. The sheeps wool apparently
                          >>contains a lanolin that rejects the dusting powder (thus facilitating
                          >>transfer) and prevents accumulation.
                          >
                          > If we're talking about the same bronzing powder--mine is in a small
                          > metal can from the 40s or 50s--I'm wondering how easily you've been
                          > able to wipe away the excess. Mine seems to cling almost as
                          > ferociously to the rest of the paper as to the fresh ink. I've heard
                          > the process works much better on a smooth or even slick paper, but
                          > that's not what I want to print on. Have you used this powder on
                          > mildly textured art papers, like Arches cover or Somerset velvet? Any
                          > suggestions would be appreciated. I've even resorted to making a
                          > template within which to brush on the powder, in order to minimize
                          > the amount that wanders.
                          >
                          > Thanks--
                          >
                          > Lisa
                          > Littoral Press
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        • Gerald Lange
                          Yes, thus the reason for the inquiry regarding sheeps wool. I ve read every bit of historical writing on the subject that I could get my hands on. Specifically
                          Message 12 of 13 , Aug 15, 2005
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                            Yes, thus the reason for the inquiry regarding sheeps wool. I've read
                            every bit of historical writing on the subject that I could get my
                            hands on. Specifically in regard to bronzing done on rough surfaced
                            (dampened) handmade paper. I think I've got a pretty good handle on it
                            now. "The old guys" did have solutions for the various problems
                            associated with bronzing but they do involve certain techniques and
                            specific materials. But they didn't have one thing that we do, an itty
                            bitty battery powered vacuum cleaner (slightly modifed). Some old,
                            some new, looks like I might have a pretty good handle on this.

                            Thanks to all who replied (and supplied). When all is said and done
                            I'll file my report :—)

                            Gerald


                            >
                            > Coarse fibered stock, and that will be most uncoated sheets other than
                            > smooth finish book, index, and bond papers, will trap the bronze powder.
                            >
                            > Fritz
                            >
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