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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Damping paper

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  • Gerald Lange
    Dear Michael I suspect most folks fall into either of these two camps. Rummonds’ technique is based on historical trade practices and, as I recall, he did
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 7 6:05 AM
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      Dear Michael

      I suspect most folks fall into either of these two camps. Rummonds’ technique
      is based on historical trade practices and, as I recall, he did not favor the
      Allen method because of possible damage to the surface of the paper during
      sponging. I believe this to be a consideration but, on the other hand, I also
      believe a lot of us have enough of a craft sensibility to where this is not
      going to happen.

      I prefer the Allen technique simply because it is a more intimate affair. But
      I don’t remember that he advocated interleaving with blotter material(?).
      William Everson has also had some interesting comments about dampened handmade
      paper from a more metaphysical standpoint: essentially that paper has a life
      of its own, and that it will constantly adapt to the situation. All the
      craftsperson has to do is control the situation. This would involve also the
      amount of time the paper sits after dampening, when to weight, when not to
      weight, when to turn, when not to turn, how much time it is left, how often it
      is turned, etc, all based on an experiential knowledge of the paper and its
      own unique adaptation process. Rather than a rote practice, I suspect
      equilization, or entropy, is really the key.

      I use the Allen method and apply the Everson wisdom. Rarely had a cockle, or a
      surface torn by the sponge, or a level of dampness that would betray me.

      >Using Allen's method, I was even going to try using air brush rather than
      >>>sponge for exact control of the amount of water on the dampened sheets used
      >for interleaving. At the same I can see the logic of absorbtion being the
      >>>great equalizer.

      Wonder if any one has tried this before. Sounds like it might be a good
      solution, especially since the Umbria is near a waterleaf with only a tad of
      internal sizing, and IS difficult to dampen with a sponge.


      All best

      Gerald
    • amyarmato
      This is a question referring to a very old thread: I have been researching the archives on using damp paper for printing (lots of great information) and have
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 16, 2006
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        This is a question referring to a very old thread: I have been
        researching the archives on using damp paper for printing (lots of
        great information) and have noticed the references to three authors on
        this subject: Rummonds (found this book at Oak Knoll), Allen (found
        "Printing with the Handpress" at Abebooks.com) but would like to know
        the title of works referred to by William Everson. Also, I see the
        "Allen Press Bibliography" has instructions on damp boxes, does
        "Printing with the Handpress" as well or am I confused?

        Thanks,
        Amy Armato
        armatodesign.com

        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear Michael
        >
        > I suspect most folks fall into either of these two camps. Rummonds'
        technique
        > is based on historical trade practices and, as I recall, he did not
        favor the
        > Allen method because of possible damage to the surface of the paper
        during
        > sponging. I believe this to be a consideration but, on the other
        hand, I also
        > believe a lot of us have enough of a craft sensibility to where this
        is not
        > going to happen.
        >
        > I prefer the Allen technique simply because it is a more intimate
        affair. But
        > I don't remember that he advocated interleaving with blotter
        material(?).
        > William Everson has also had some interesting comments about
        dampened handmade
        > paper from a more metaphysical standpoint: essentially that paper
        has a life
        > of its own, and that it will constantly adapt to the situation. All the
        > craftsperson has to do is control the situation. This would involve
        also the
        > amount of time the paper sits after dampening, when to weight, when
        not to
        > weight, when to turn, when not to turn, how much time it is left,
        how often it
        > is turned, etc, all based on an experiential knowledge of the paper
        and its
        > own unique adaptation process. Rather than a rote practice, I suspect
        > equilization, or entropy, is really the key.
        >
        > I use the Allen method and apply the Everson wisdom. Rarely had a
        cockle, or a
        > surface torn by the sponge, or a level of dampness that would betray me.
        >
        > >Using Allen's method, I was even going to try using air brush
        rather than
        > >>>sponge for exact control of the amount of water on the dampened
        sheets used
        > >for interleaving. At the same I can see the logic of absorbtion
        being the
        > >>>great equalizer.
        >
        > Wonder if any one has tried this before. Sounds like it might be a good
        > solution, especially since the Umbria is near a waterleaf with only
        a tad of
        > internal sizing, and IS difficult to dampen with a sponge.
        >
        >
        > All best
        >
        > Gerald
        >
      • Norman L McKnight
        Amy: The so-called Everson work is, I think, not a book but a text that the Allens quoted in their book: Printing With The Handpress. It appears on pp. 47/48
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 16, 2006
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          Amy: The so-called Everson work is, I think, not a book but a
          text that the Allens quoted in their book: Printing With The
          Handpress. It appears on pp. 47/48 of the 1st trade edition (Van
          Nostrand-Reinhold, 1969). It is fairly short, but their treatment
          of damping paper is excellent & thorough.

          The Rummonds book: Printing On The Iron Handpress does not de-
          scribe a humidor, but has considerable information on damping
          paper. His companion work: Nineteenth Century Printing Practices
          & The Iron Handpress also has numerous period articles treating
          the subject, vol. 1: pp. 447-481.

          As is usual in letterpess, you need to experiment using these
          texts as a guide.

          Norman McKnight
          Philoxenia Press
          Berkeley
        • Gerald Lange
          Amy Printing with the Handpress has the instructions for making the humidors. There is no book by Everson on printing but there have been occasional pieces
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 16, 2006
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            Amy

            Printing with the Handpress has the instructions for making the
            humidors. There is no book by Everson on printing but there have been
            occasional pieces printed here and there from his letters and
            lectures. The magazine Quarry West, #32, Fall 1995 was dedicated
            partly to Everson and there are a couple of paragraphs within on his
            approach to dampening paper.

            Gerald
            http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "amyarmato" <amy@...> wrote:
            >
            > This is a question referring to a very old thread: I have been
            > researching the archives on using damp paper for printing (lots of
            > great information) and have noticed the references to three authors on
            > this subject: Rummonds (found this book at Oak Knoll), Allen (found
            > "Printing with the Handpress" at Abebooks.com) but would like to know
            > the title of works referred to by William Everson. Also, I see the
            > "Allen Press Bibliography" has instructions on damp boxes, does
            > "Printing with the Handpress" as well or am I confused?
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Amy Armato
            > armatodesign.com
            >
            > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Gerald Lange <bieler@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Dear Michael
            > >
            > > I suspect most folks fall into either of these two camps. Rummonds'
            > technique
            > > is based on historical trade practices and, as I recall, he did not
            > favor the
            > > Allen method because of possible damage to the surface of the paper
            > during
            > > sponging. I believe this to be a consideration but, on the other
            > hand, I also
            > > believe a lot of us have enough of a craft sensibility to where this
            > is not
            > > going to happen.
            > >
            > > I prefer the Allen technique simply because it is a more intimate
            > affair. But
            > > I don't remember that he advocated interleaving with blotter
            > material(?).
            > > William Everson has also had some interesting comments about
            > dampened handmade
            > > paper from a more metaphysical standpoint: essentially that paper
            > has a life
            > > of its own, and that it will constantly adapt to the situation.
            All the
            > > craftsperson has to do is control the situation. This would involve
            > also the
            > > amount of time the paper sits after dampening, when to weight, when
            > not to
            > > weight, when to turn, when not to turn, how much time it is left,
            > how often it
            > > is turned, etc, all based on an experiential knowledge of the paper
            > and its
            > > own unique adaptation process. Rather than a rote practice, I suspect
            > > equilization, or entropy, is really the key.
            > >
            > > I use the Allen method and apply the Everson wisdom. Rarely had a
            > cockle, or a
            > > surface torn by the sponge, or a level of dampness that would
            betray me.
            > >
            > > >Using Allen's method, I was even going to try using air brush
            > rather than
            > > >>>sponge for exact control of the amount of water on the dampened
            > sheets used
            > > >for interleaving. At the same I can see the logic of absorbtion
            > being the
            > > >>>great equalizer.
            > >
            > > Wonder if any one has tried this before. Sounds like it might be a
            good
            > > solution, especially since the Umbria is near a waterleaf with only
            > a tad of
            > > internal sizing, and IS difficult to dampen with a sponge.
            > >
            > >
            > > All best
            > >
            > > Gerald
            > >
            >
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