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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: troubleshooting

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  • LA. Book Arts
    All, the problem she has is with the machine, the machine doesn t seem to have a gage for vacuum pressure, so basically she has no way of knowing if she has
    Message 1 of 28 , Jun 3, 2005
      All,

      the problem she has is with the machine, the machine doesn't seem to
      have a gage for vacuum pressure, so basically she has no way of knowing
      if she has enough or what.
      The exposing of a plate with Film is a very critical stage of
      platemaking, a good vacuum, a good piece of Film and it's smooth
      sailing. I just made 65 9.5 x13 inch plates (WH 94) for a book project
      the other day.
      If you have no way of measuring your action it is very difficult to
      repeat it over and over.

      charles


      www.custombindery.com
    • Gerald Lange
      Harold I actually prefer the BASF, especially for halftones or very fine detail though I am not sure I have quite figured out the correct washout for them as
      Message 2 of 28 , Jun 3, 2005
        Harold

        I actually prefer the BASF, especially for halftones or very fine
        detail though I am not sure I have quite figured out the correct
        washout for them as they never seem finished to me. The surface
        texture is ideal, but yes, they do stink and crud up the bath. I like
        plates that indicate by color, surface and subsurface, which both the
        BASF and the Toyobo do. For some reason I think it helps clarify
        things for me.

        There are probably a lot better plates out there, BASF is getting to
        be rather old technology I'd think (maybe that's not bad though).
        Would appreciate any info you discover in this regard.

        You might like this: When I first started buying photopolymer plates I
        went to visit my processor and discovered a completely different plate
        on his press (a BASF). I asked him why he didn't sell those to his
        clients. He didn't miss a beat, "Because my customers are too f***ing
        cheap."

        At any rate, I keep profiles on clients as to their needs and
        expectations and often process plates based on various formulas I have
        used. I think the Toyobos require much less exposure and much more
        washout (than the reps tell you) to get to finer detail and better
        substructure. I've run Jets at the same formula and they are not quite
        there. So I assume they have their own configuration. But I don't use
        them or sell them so don't know what that would be.

        Once again, good luck with the move.

        Gerald

        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Harold Kyle <harold@b...> wrote:
        > On 6/3/05 5:45 PM, "Gerald Lange" <bieler@w...> wrote:
        > > My comment about higher grade plate brand had nothing to do with
        Toyobo.
        > I'm sorry--I thought that was the plate that you preferred. Would a
        higher
        > grade be BASF? Are there any other plates that you consider top of
        the line?
        >
        > > so it is essentially
        > > misleading to compare them or any other plate brand in the manner that
        > > you suggest.
        > The test I did showed that the Printight plate gained more with less
        detail.
        > To get more detail I would have had to increase exposure, causing
        more gain.
        > I relied on the rep selling Printight to dial in the right numbers.
        But I
        > agree that this is a slippery issue, and best left up to the printer's
        > judgement. I'm stating my personal preference and standing up for it
        based
        > on tests I've done. The differences between brands are minimal but
        when I
        > print I have the attitude: "I need all the help I can get." I really
        wish I
        > could afford BASF plates, and I might consider using them more if they
        > didn't smell so much!
        >
        > > Just out of curiosity, would you have switched brands if Toyobo had
        > > surpassed the Jet in your comparison test?
        > We sell Printight plates alongside Jet and BASF plates, so we're very
        > familiar with the Printight brand in relation to the competition. We
        prefer
        > them for intaglio processing. The pricing is comparable with Jet
        plates, so
        > yes I would be tempted to switch brands if I felt the plates were
        equally
        > sharp on the letterpress. The Printight salesman hasn't given up--we
        may be
        > troubleshooting the gain issues soon. For now, I'm sticking with the
        plates
        > that I know are going to give the best results.
        >
        > I'll be back on Monday! The trailer's loaded up and ready to go.
        >
        > Harold
        >
        >
        > Boxcar Press
        > Fine Printing / Digital Letterpress Supplies
        > Delavan Center / 501 W. Fayette St. / Studio 222 / Syracuse, NY 13204
        > 315-473-0930 phone / 315-473-0967 fax / www.boxcarpress.com
      • Gerald Lange
        Hi Charles No vacuum gauge? How did you find that out? Geez, this was all sort of a big waste of time then wasn t it? If it does nothing else, a gauge will
        Message 3 of 28 , Jun 4, 2005
          Hi Charles

          No vacuum gauge? How did you find that out?

          Geez, this was all sort of a big waste of time then wasn't it? If it
          does nothing else, a gauge will tell you when vacuum is iffy, and, if
          it reveals release during exposure, your plate/s just went south. Kind
          of an important feature.

          Gerald


          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, LA. Book Arts <livres@a...> wrote:
          > All,
          >
          > the problem she has is with the machine, the machine doesn't seem to
          > have a gage for vacuum pressure, so basically she has no way of knowing
          > if she has enough or what.
          > The exposing of a plate with Film is a very critical stage of
          > platemaking, a good vacuum, a good piece of Film and it's smooth
          > sailing. I just made 65 9.5 x13 inch plates (WH 94) for a book project
          > the other day.
          > If you have no way of measuring your action it is very difficult to
          > repeat it over and over.
          >
          > charles
          >
          >
          > www.custombindery.com
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