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Re: damping paper

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  • author50401
    ... Board dampers. ... discoloration as ... water and If you had ever seen (or smelled) the Davey board factory, you might think twice about using these boards
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 5, 2002
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      --- In PPLetterpress@y..., Michael McGarvey <mcgarvem@l...> wrote:
      > Dear Martin,
      >
      > I have been using Rummonds' method for dampening, but with Davey
      Board dampers.
      > But they seem to leave an impression on the sheet, and some
      discoloration as
      > well. The discoloration could be due to my water which is well
      water and

      If you had ever seen (or smelled) the Davey board factory, you might
      think twice about using these boards in contact with wet paper.

      In another life I taught a bindery class at Northern Illinois
      University. As a part of that course we took several field trips, one
      of which was to the Davey board plant in Aurora. It was always an eye
      opener for the students (and for me). The raw material is office
      waste which comes in baled. The whole operation is very smelly, but
      interesting. The end product is very good for its intended purpose,
      but one of those purposes is not as interleaving between sheets of
      dampened paper.

      I'm sure everyone has their own little tricks in getting the results
      they desire, but I always seek the methods which take the least
      amount of time away from my hours at printing. I simply dip and dunk
      a half-dozen sheets at a time in the vat, followed in the post with
      about the same number of dry sheets, alternating wet and dry until I
      get the requisite number. Leave in a plastic bag overnight & start
      printing in the morning.
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