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Tips on where to acquire a letterpress??

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  • mzslb
    I know of some printers who get calls from people saying, if you ll come get this press out of my shed you can have it for free . I am interested in
    Message 1 of 3 , May 11, 2005
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      I know of some printers who get calls from people saying, "if you'll
      come get this press out of my shed you can have it for free". I am
      interested
      in acquiring a press, specifically a C&P 10 x 15 or preferably a 12 x
      18 with a
      motor. However I'm also trying to get the best deal. I would love
      to find one
      within driving distance to NC to avoid high freight charges.
      Currently I rent
      studio time from a printer but would like to obtain my own if the
      right press
      came along. Any tips on finding presses out there? Thanks!

      sherry
    • Gerald Lange
      Sherry Often times the presses you get for free end up costing quite a bit to refurbish. A few years back a friend of mine told me about an SP15-, and SP-20,
      Message 2 of 3 , May 11, 2005
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        Sherry

        Often times the presses you get for "free" end up costing quite a bit
        to refurbish. A few years back a friend of mine told me about an
        SP15-, and SP-20, and a large Reliance that were free for the taking.
        Three of us split them up and divided the costs of drayage. I opted
        for the Reliance which I left there for a museum to pickup as it had a
        number of welds and was missing its frisket and tympan. The SP-20 cost
        about $1,200 to fix up, the SP-15 disappeared into a garage where it
        probably sits today.

        It's really a better idea to buy a press that is in fine working
        condition and pay for that nicety. Used presses don't cost that much
        relative to their original price tag. And quickly return the
        expenditure if you are doing any kind of commissioned work at all.

        You might want to check out the Briar Press listings occasionally.

        http://www.briarpress.org/briarpress

        or contact one of the equipment dealers that refurbish presses such as
        Don Black or SOS Linotype. I've seen some very nicely rebuilt
        Vandercooks from the latter. But if you do inquire around, don't tell
        folks you are looking for "a letterpress"! You will be branded
        immediately. Letterpress is the process/technology. You want a press
        used for letterpress printing.

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "mzslb" <mzslb@a...> wrote:
        > I know of some printers who get calls from people saying, "if you'll
        > come get this press out of my shed you can have it for free". I am
        > interested
        > in acquiring a press, specifically a C&P 10 x 15 or preferably a 12 x
        > 18 with a
        > motor. However I'm also trying to get the best deal. I would love
        > to find one
        > within driving distance to NC to avoid high freight charges.
        > Currently I rent
        > studio time from a printer but would like to obtain my own if the
        > right press
        > came along. Any tips on finding presses out there? Thanks!
        >
        > sherry
      • Paul W Romaine
        ... Gerald is quite correct. Unfortunately the usage is enshrined at Briarpress (see top link How to classify a letterpress ). And unfortunately, too, there
        Message 3 of 3 , May 11, 2005
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          > But if you do inquire around, don't tell
          > folks you are looking for "a letterpress"! You will be branded
          > immediately. Letterpress is the process/technology. You want a press
          > used for letterpress printing.

          Gerald is quite correct. Unfortunately the usage is enshrined at
          Briarpress (see top link "How to classify a letterpress"). And
          unfortunately, too, there is an historical precedent: John Smith's
          _Printers' Grammar_ (1755 et seq.) makes the same use on the
          titlepage, but it's uncommon. I haven't checked Stower (who used
          Smith), but it's definitely uncommon. (Also, to make things more
          confusing, for any librarian with a manuscripts background, the
          "letterpress" was an 18th C device for making chemical copies of your
          handwritten letter--this was before carbon paper or photocopying. Both
          Jefferson and Franklin owned and use one.)

          Paul
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