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archival inks and papers?

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  • londonbellman
    Hey group, My questions are : What inks would be considered archival for letterpress work? Any recommendations as far as color fastness,range of colors
    Message 1 of 3 , May 9, 2005
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      Hey group,
      My questions are : What inks would be considered archival for letterpress work?
      Any recommendations as far as color fastness,range of colors available in a product line,
      who's inks work the best? I'm sure this is all a matter of preference but your suggestions
      are greatly appreciated. Things I've read so far mention that the common inks are rubber
      based. I'll be using composition rollers and was wondering what products would work best
      in this situation? I also realize sizing in the paper affects the adhesive and coverage of ink
      on the papers surface. Does anyone have a favorite rag paper that takes a nice impression
      without resisting? Thanks again... Regards, London
    • Gerald Lange
      London These are some fairly open-ended questions. . . Don t know how useful this is: I don t use composition rolles so I don t really know what inks would
      Message 2 of 3 , May 11, 2005
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        London

        These are some fairly open-ended questions. . .

        Don't know how useful this is:

        I don't use composition rolles so I don't really know what inks would
        work best for them. I print on Vandercooks with rubber rollers and
        often dampened handmade or mouldmade papers. Stone litho printmaking
        inks seem to work fairly well for this. I think most of these inks are
        oil-based but a lot of inks are hybrids today, so can't say for sure.
        These inks are usually quite sticky and stiff, probably don't work all
        that well on platens, if that is what you are using.

        I've found externally sized papers to be a bit harder to control in
        regard to inking and presswork. So I avoid papers specifically
        formulated for watercolor and don't use a lot of commercial grade
        papers formulated for offset. On jobs were I am running a commercial
        grade paper I am usually tempted to run good ole VansSons # 10850,
        which I believe is an old-formula rubber-base and rarely lets you
        down. I've also used it quite a bit for altering the viscosity of
        other inks. It's also a pretty good repro ink. We used it as a "wiper"
        in a collotype project and it performed quite well.

        Most quality printing inks seem to be archival and color-fast. In
        regard to color I keep on hand a lot of different blacks, some very
        good opaque and transparent whites, and the basic primary colors for
        mixing, and a bunch of additives.

        I'm working on a job now where I am using some very high grade hundred
        year old bronze dusting powders (and varnish) in a sort of marblized
        mix of colors. That's been kind of interesting to try and work out to
        a fairly consistent routine for editioning.

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com




        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "londonbellman"
        <londonbellman@y...> wrote:
        > Hey group,
        > My questions are : What inks would be considered
        archival for letterpress work?
        > Any recommendations as far as color fastness,range of colors
        available in a product line,
        > who's inks work the best? I'm sure this is all a matter of
        preference but your suggestions
        > are greatly appreciated. Things I've read so far mention that the
        common inks are rubber
        > based. I'll be using composition rollers and was wondering what
        products would work best
        > in this situation? I also realize sizing in the paper affects the
        adhesive and coverage of ink
        > on the papers surface. Does anyone have a favorite rag paper that
        takes a nice impression
        > without resisting? Thanks again... Regards, London
      • John Cornelisse
        ... London, VanSon still produces a few old style letterpress inks, though offset-inks like their panthone-series in tubes behave too nicely on letterpress. As
        Message 3 of 3 , May 11, 2005
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          At 10:01 11-05-2005, you wrote:
          >London
          >
          >These are some fairly open-ended questions. . .
          >
          >Don't know how useful this is:
          >
          >I don't use composition rolles so I don't really know what inks would
          >work best for them.

          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "londonbellman"
          ><londonbellman@y...> wrote:
          > > Hey group,
          > > My questions are : What inks would be considered
          >archival for letterpress work?
          > > Any recommendations as far as color fastness,range of colors
          >available in a product line,
          > > who's inks work the best? I'm sure this is all a matter of
          >preference but your suggestions
          > > are greatly appreciated. Things I've read so far mention that the
          >common inks are rubber
          > > based. I'll be using composition rollers and was wondering what
          >products would work best
          > > in this situation? I also realize sizing in the paper affects the
          >adhesive and coverage of ink
          > > on the papers surface. Does anyone have a favorite rag paper that
          >takes a nice impression
          > > without resisting? Thanks again... Regards, London


          London,

          VanSon still produces a few old style letterpress inks, though
          offset-inks like their panthone-series in tubes behave too
          nicely on letterpress. As I experienced.

          Offset-inks contain a lot more pigment, than old-style inks for letterpress
          some decades ago.

          Composition-rolls, that's aq bit oldfashioned and old-style.

          If you are willing to use a few extra sets of rolls, because the behaviour
          of composition in winter and summer... When the humidity of the air and the
          overall temperature changes, the diameter of these rolls will alter too.

          So in the past, most printers had extra sets of rolls. And not only because
          the need for clean rolls doing colour-printing. (Printing yellow with rolls
          used for black... is quite a cleaning-job.)

          So using composition...

          you will need extra work, adjusting the pressure of the rolls,
          when ever the season changes. Or the installation of an air-conditioning.

          By the way, keep your composition-rolls away from rodents.

          Those rolls are perfect food for mice and rats:
          sugar, glycerine & gelatine from bone-glue...

          A friend of mine can tell you more about this.

          Rubber-rolls do the same job, and presently the rubber can be produced
          in many grades. Soft or hard or in between, you can get it all.

          The price of composition compared with rubber-coated rolls, that's no reason
          for using composition either.


          Best wishes

          John Cornelisse



          Letter-press & Typefounding, Monotype-composition

          Vaartstraat 23
          4553 AN Philippine
          (Zeeuws Vlaanderen)
          The Netherlands
          + 31 - (0) 115 - 491184
          email: enkidu@...

          So she spoke to him and her word found favour,
          he knew by instinct, he should seek a friend.


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