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Re: Trapping to reduce weight of type

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  • Gerald Lange
    Kim A formula of less exposure and maximum washout will produce a finer image and a more stable relief structure, as sort of a standard practice in processing
    Message 1 of 53 , Apr 26, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Kim

      A formula of less exposure and maximum washout will produce a finer
      image and a more stable relief structure, as sort of a standard
      practice in processing but the concern expressed by Harold and one
      that I would agree with is that there is a discernable increase in
      image when printed as opposed to what one sees on the negative - even
      with efforts attempted at the processing stage.

      The solutions to this involve prepress manipulation. Even with a light
      impression letterform spread is apparent (at lease it has always
      seemed that way to me). With the heavier impression that is often
      practiced today, examples I have seen show that the letterforms will
      not only spread but will splay or distort under pressure. I'm not sure
      if this has to do with the brand or configuration of the plate
      material or is a combination of poor choice in plate or base or... but
      I really don't know the solution to this, other than to suggest that
      photopolymer plates really don't perform well under undue impression.
      I suspect there is a very good reason for the manufacturing
      limitations of their thickness and relief depth.

      Prepress manipulation of imaging usually involves either some form of
      alteration in Photoshop or Streamline. Digital type manipulation
      usually involves editing in a program like Fontographer or FontLab.
      For me, these are fairly standard practices. I believe the thread
      started out as an inquiry as to the possibility of a more global
      approach to the problem; a solution that could be derived by quickly
      altering the file (or page) itself.

      The PDF query might be a solution but I suspect only if the PDF is
      of the type designated as for "professional publishing," i.e., the
      hi-rez configuration that is usually sent to printers:
      http://www.tshore.com/DesktopDefault.aspx?tabid=23

      Gerald


      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Kim Vanderheiden
      <paintedtongue@e...> wrote:
      > Hi Harold and Gerald,
      >
      > I don't remember the conversation earlier, so maybe this was already
      said, but why not just increase the washout time slightly in the
      platemaker? Of course increasing it too much will make the type less
      stable for those who are running jobs with deep impression. But in my
      experience, unless I'm overinked or my rollers are too low, the ink
      spread on the type making it larger is small to none. I would think it
      wouldn't take much manipulation with the platemaker to counter that
      effect.
      >
      > Kim
      >
      >
      > Harold
      >
      > Going way back to this one. I was recenting working with an
      > application, nothing to do with all of this, but I needed to import
      > PDFs into it (which it was not equipped to accept) and discovered that
      > if I opened the PDF in Photoshop and then generated the file as a tiff
      > (with layers tossed during the save), that is was much slimmed down. I
      > recall someone mentioning this previously, about PDFs, and an Adobe
      > tech who suggested that this was the case but not quite understanding
      > why. Might be worth exploring.
      >
      > Gerald
      >
      > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Harold Kyle <harold@b...> wrote:
      > > Does anyone know of a way, either with application-based trapping or
      > with
      > > high-end in-RIP trapping, to counteract letterpress ink spread by
      > reducing
      > > the stroke weight of text?
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > > Harold
      > >
      > >
      > > Boxcar Press
      > > Fine Printing / Digital Letterpress Supplies
      > > Delavan Center / 501 W. Fayette St. / Studio 222 / Syracuse, NY 13204
      > > 315-473-0930 phone / 315-473-0967 fax / www.boxcarpress.com
    • Gerald Lange
      Kim A formula of less exposure and maximum washout will produce a finer image and a more stable relief structure, as sort of a standard practice in processing
      Message 53 of 53 , Apr 26, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Kim

        A formula of less exposure and maximum washout will produce a finer
        image and a more stable relief structure, as sort of a standard
        practice in processing but the concern expressed by Harold and one
        that I would agree with is that there is a discernable increase in
        image when printed as opposed to what one sees on the negative - even
        with efforts attempted at the processing stage.

        The solutions to this involve prepress manipulation. Even with a light
        impression letterform spread is apparent (at lease it has always
        seemed that way to me). With the heavier impression that is often
        practiced today, examples I have seen show that the letterforms will
        not only spread but will splay or distort under pressure. I'm not sure
        if this has to do with the brand or configuration of the plate
        material or is a combination of poor choice in plate or base or... but
        I really don't know the solution to this, other than to suggest that
        photopolymer plates really don't perform well under undue impression.
        I suspect there is a very good reason for the manufacturing
        limitations of their thickness and relief depth.

        Prepress manipulation of imaging usually involves either some form of
        alteration in Photoshop or Streamline. Digital type manipulation
        usually involves editing in a program like Fontographer or FontLab.
        For me, these are fairly standard practices. I believe the thread
        started out as an inquiry as to the possibility of a more global
        approach to the problem; a solution that could be derived by quickly
        altering the file (or page) itself.

        The PDF query might be a solution but I suspect only if the PDF is
        of the type designated as for "professional publishing," i.e., the
        hi-rez configuration that is usually sent to printers:
        http://www.tshore.com/DesktopDefault.aspx?tabid=23

        Gerald


        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Kim Vanderheiden
        <paintedtongue@e...> wrote:
        > Hi Harold and Gerald,
        >
        > I don't remember the conversation earlier, so maybe this was already
        said, but why not just increase the washout time slightly in the
        platemaker? Of course increasing it too much will make the type less
        stable for those who are running jobs with deep impression. But in my
        experience, unless I'm overinked or my rollers are too low, the ink
        spread on the type making it larger is small to none. I would think it
        wouldn't take much manipulation with the platemaker to counter that
        effect.
        >
        > Kim
        >
        >
        > Harold
        >
        > Going way back to this one. I was recenting working with an
        > application, nothing to do with all of this, but I needed to import
        > PDFs into it (which it was not equipped to accept) and discovered that
        > if I opened the PDF in Photoshop and then generated the file as a tiff
        > (with layers tossed during the save), that is was much slimmed down. I
        > recall someone mentioning this previously, about PDFs, and an Adobe
        > tech who suggested that this was the case but not quite understanding
        > why. Might be worth exploring.
        >
        > Gerald
        >
        > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Harold Kyle <harold@b...> wrote:
        > > Does anyone know of a way, either with application-based trapping or
        > with
        > > high-end in-RIP trapping, to counteract letterpress ink spread by
        > reducing
        > > the stroke weight of text?
        > >
        > > Thanks,
        > > Harold
        > >
        > >
        > > Boxcar Press
        > > Fine Printing / Digital Letterpress Supplies
        > > Delavan Center / 501 W. Fayette St. / Studio 222 / Syracuse, NY 13204
        > > 315-473-0930 phone / 315-473-0967 fax / www.boxcarpress.com
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